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Welcome to The Visible Embryo, a comprehensive educational resource on human development from conception to birth.

The Visible Embryo provides visual references for changes in fetal development throughout pregnancy and can be navigated via fetal development or maternal changes.

The National Institutes of Child Health and Human Development awarded Phase I and Phase II Small Business Innovative Research Grants to develop The Visible Embryo in 1993 as a first generation internet teaching tool consolidating human embryology teaching for first year medical students.

Today, The Visible Embryo is linked to over 600 educational institutions and is viewed by more than 1 million visitors each month. The field of early embryology has grown to include the identification of the stem cell as not only critical to organogenesis in the embryo, but equally critical to organ function and repair in the adult human. The identification and understanding of genetic malfunction, inflammatory responses, and the progression in chronic disease, begins with a grounding in primary cellular and systemic functions manifested in the study of the early embryo.


WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform


The World Health Organization (WHO) has created a new Web site to help researchers, doctors and patients obtain reliable information on high-quality clinical trials. Now you can go to one website and search all registers to identify clinical trial research underway around the world!



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Disclaimer: The Visible Embryo web site is provided for your general information only. The information contained on this site should not be treated as a substitute for medical, legal or other professional advice. Neither is The Visible Embryo responsible or liable for the contents of any websites of third parties which are listed on this site.
Content protected under a Creative Commons License.

No dirivative works may be made or used for commercial purposes.

 
Pregnancy Timeline by SemestersFetal liver is producing blood cellsHead may position into pelvisBrain convolutions beginFull TermWhite fat begins to be madeWhite fat begins to be madeHead may position into pelvisImmune system beginningImmune system beginningPeriod of rapid brain growthBrain convolutions beginLungs begin to produce surfactantSensory brain waves begin to activateSensory brain waves begin to activateInner Ear Bones HardenBone marrow starts making blood cellsBone marrow starts making blood cellsBrown fat surrounds lymphatic systemFetal sexual organs visibleFinger and toe prints appearFinger and toe prints appearHeartbeat can be detectedHeartbeat can be detectedBasic Brain Structure in PlaceThe Appearance of SomitesFirst Detectable Brain WavesA Four Chambered HeartBeginning Cerebral HemispheresFemale Reproductive SystemEnd of Embryonic PeriodEnd of Embryonic PeriodFirst Thin Layer of Skin AppearsThird TrimesterSecond TrimesterFirst TrimesterFertilizationDevelopmental Timeline
Click on weeks 0 - 40 to follow fetal growth every two weeks
Google Search artcles published since 2007
 
Home-   -History-  -Bibliography-   -Pregnancy TimelinePrescription Drugs  -    Pregnancy Calculator -    Reproductive System- -  News Alerts

 

Aug 20, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Prenatal alcohol affects all brain development
Children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) showed weaker brain response during cognitive tasks, than unaffected children.

Aug 19, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How enzymes know what to keep or trash in a cell
The protein Dis3l2 uses numerous recognition sites to capture messages that are flagged for decay.

Aug 18, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Scientists find calorie-burning switch in brown fat
Biologists have identified a signaling pathway that switches on a powerful calorie-burning process in brown fat cells.

Aug 15, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

A neural 'sweet spot' may help curb obesity
Preventing weight gain, obesity, and ultimately diabetes could be as simple as keeping a nuclear receptor from becomming active in a small part of the brain.

Aug 14, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Turing theory (1952) explains formation of fingers
Researchers confirm that a mathematical theory, first proposed by Alan Turing who designed the machines which cracked the German military codes in 1952, can explain the formation of fingers.

Aug 13, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Autism, Sensory Processing Disorders not the same
Groundbreaking research shows children with Sensory Processing Disorders have measureable brain differences from children with Autism Spectrum Disorders.

Aug 12, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Sugar chains guide stem cells to a neural fate
Embryonic stem cells can develop into a multitude of cells types. The key to this may be the long sugar chains dangling from proteins on the surfaces of cells.

Aug 11, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Brain cells arrange themselves by birth order
Generating retinal ganglion cells — the axon cells that extend into the centers of our brain and give us "sight" — depends on "who came first."

Aug 8, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Mom's DDT exposure linked to obesity and diabetes
Exposure of pregnant mice to the pesticide DDT is linked to an increased risk of obesity, diabetes, high cholesterol and related conditions in female offspring later in life.

Aug 7, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Molecular competition specializes adult stem cells
From fruit flies to humans, adult stem cells either self-renew through cell division or differentiate to replace worn-out or damaged organs and tissues.

Aug 6, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Preterm children's brains can catch up years later
There's some good news for parents of preterm babies – latest research shows that by the time they become teenagers, the brains of many preterm children can perform almost as well as those born at term.

Aug 5, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Mothers teach babies fears via mother's own odor
Research in rats may help explain how trauma's effects can span generations — and how irrational fears may be helped by blocking activity in the amygdala.

Aug 4, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Age of female puberty depends on only one parent
The age at which a girl reaches sexual maturity is influenced by 'imprinted' genes, which are the genes of only one of her parents.

Aug 1, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Kisspeptin may trigger IVF ovulation more safely
Researchers have successfully used a new and potentially safer method to stimulate ovulation in women undergoing IVF treatment.

July 31, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Key to egg implantation in uterus
Scientists have identified a crucial regulator for how an egg correctly implants. Wnt5a may also help explain the mechanical defects affecting infertility, abnormal placental development and placenta previa.

July 30, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Found, crucial path to embryo facial development
A key pathway in the formation of the front of the developing embryo gives rise to the face.

July 29, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Good mothering' hardwires infant brain
Watching mother rats care for their pups while simultaneously scanning those pups' brains — shows how nuturing molds brain growth.

July 28, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Two proteins 'pulse' information into memory
Neuroscientists in Germany have succeeded in providing new insights on the link between nerve cells as the interface to the hippocampus and stored memory.

July 25, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Gene link to fatal child inflammatory disease SAVI
Repurposed drugs may offer the first potential therapy to a very rare but devastating autoinflammatory disease in children.

July 24, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Life-saving stem cells may be easier to create
Researchers have found a gene that could be key to developing stem cells — cells that can potentially save millions of lives as they are able to morph into practically any cell in the body.

July 23, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Sexual selection linked to placenta formation
Fish with placentas are smaller and less brightly colored than non-placental fish. Yet if natural selection favors showy displays such as the male peacock's tail, how has sexual selection worked for less attractive males and the opposite sex?

July 22, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

"You are what your grandfather ate"
A new study shows that epigenetic effects are passed down from one generation to the next — through fathers — as well as mothers and finds that these effects may fade over time.

July 21, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

One injection stops diabetes in its tracks
In mice with diet-induced diabetes — the equivalent of type 2 diabetes in humans — a single injection of the protein FGF1 is enough to restore blood sugar levels to a healthy range for more than two days and without side effects.

July 18, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Gene essential in embryos, toxic in adult cell division
A gene factor called NANOG is essential to pluripotency in the embryo as it implants in the womb. It also regulates cell proliferation in skin, epithelia cells, and the esophagus of adult organisms. In fact, blocking NANOG reduces division in tumor cells.

July 17, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Timing is not only ticking
Many animals exhibit segmentation in development. A classic example being the sequence formation of the backbone, linked to the ticking of a “segmentation clock” in the embryo. Max Planck researchers now discover the sound pattern known as the Doppler effect influences all segmentation in the embryo.

July 16, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

An amazing 'switch' in our brains
An amazing "switch" may be available to shut off (and turn on?) signals that promote the generation of new nerve cells and survival of old ones.

July 15, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Reverse engineering brain circuits
In a new study, Brown University neuroscientists looked cell-by-cell at the brain circuitry tadpoles, and possibly other animals like ourselves, use to avoid collisions.

July 14, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Babies of healthy moms worldwide are similar
Babies' growth in the womb and their size at birth, especially their length, are strikingly similar the world over when born to healthy, well-educated and well-nourished mothers.

July 11, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Dad's ethnic origin influences child's birthweight
A father's ethnic background can influence a child's birthweight as much as the mother's ethnic background, a new study has found. Previous research had only shown that a mother's ethnic background can influence a baby's birthweight.

July 10, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Nuclear transfer best for creating stem cells
This finding could lead to improved avenues for developing stem cell therapies as well as a better understanding of the basic biology of stem cells.

July 9, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Schizophrenia gene affects brain cell development
While no single genetic mutation is known to cause schizophrenia, genomewide association studies have identified gene variations in the developing brains of mice that are more common in humans with schizophrenia than in the general population.

July 8, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Embryonic stem cells organize geometrically
About seven days after conception, something remarkable occurs in the clump of cells that will eventually become a new human being. They start to specialize or "differentiate" and display characteristics of their ultimate fate as one of the 200 or so cell types that exist in humans.

July 7, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Child life stress can leave lasting impact on brain
For children, stress can go a long way. A little bit provides a platform for learning, adapting and coping. But a lot of chronic, stress like poverty, neglect and physical abuse is toxic and can have lasting negative impacts.

July 4, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

3-D view of brain's center of memory and learning
Researchers with Oregon Health & Science University's Vollum Institute have given science a new and unprecedented 3-D view of one of the most important areas in the brain — a receptor that allows us to learn and remember.

July 3, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How sperm bore into the egg
A key protein is discovered which sperm need to fertilize an egg. Before it can fertilize an egg, a sperm has to bore through the outer egg layer known as the zona pellucida. Despite decades of research, some of the mechanisms in this process were unclear.

July 2, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

"Enhancer" gene region triggers cell pluripotency
Scientists from The University of Manchester have identified an important trigger that dictates cells change their identity and become pluripotent.

July 1, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Caffeine affects boys and girls differently in puberty
Caffeine intake by children and adolescents has been rising for decades, due to marketing to children as young as four. Despite this, there is little research on the effects of caffeine on young people.

June 30 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Scoliosis and Marfans linked to rare gene mutations
Children with rare mutations in two genes are about four times more likely to develop severe scoliosis, curvature of the spine, than children with normal versions of those genes.

June 27 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How nerves tell top from bottom - front from back
Neurons and axons have polarity which gives them direction in the body. Positioning is fundamental to any organism. All cellular structures must be precisely oriented in order to work accurately.

June 26 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Limb regeneration: Do salamanders hold the key?
The secret of how salamanders successfully regrow body parts is being unravelled. For the first time, researchers have found that a protein path called the 'ERK pathway' must be constantly active in order for salamander cells to reprogram and regenerate body parts.

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