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Pregnancy Timeline by SemestersFemale Reproductive SystemFertilizationThe Appearance of SomitesFirst TrimesterSecond TrimesterThird TrimesterFetal liver is producing blood cellsHead may position into pelvisBrain convolutions beginFull TermWhite fat begins to be madeWhite fat begins to be madeHead may position into pelvisImmune system beginningImmune system beginningPeriod of rapid brain growthBrain convolutions beginLungs begin to produce surfactantSensory brain waves begin to activateSensory brain waves begin to activateInner Ear Bones HardenBone marrow starts making blood cellsBone marrow starts making blood cellsBrown fat surrounds lymphatic systemFetal sexual organs visibleFinger and toe prints appearFinger and toe prints appearHeartbeat can be detectedHeartbeat can be detectedBasic Brain Structure in PlaceThe Appearance of SomitesFirst Detectable Brain WavesA Four Chambered HeartBeginning Cerebral HemispheresEnd of Embryonic PeriodEnd of Embryonic PeriodFirst Thin Layer of Skin AppearsThird TrimesterDevelopmental Timeline
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September 24, 2012--------News Archive Return to: News Alerts








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Cause of Diabetes May be Linked to Iron Transport

Scientists show that increased activity of one particular iron-transport protein destroys insulin-producing beta cells — and that mice without this transporter don't get diabetes

Researchers at the University of Copenhagen and Novo Nordisk A/S have now shown that the increased activity of one particular iron-transport protein destroys insulin-producing beta cells. In addition, the new research shows that mice without this iron transporter are protected against developing diabetes.

These results have just been published in the prestigious journal Cell Metabolism.

Almost 300,000 Danes have diabetes – 80 per cent have type-2 diabetes, a so-called lifestyle disease. The number of people with diabetes doubles every decade and the disease costs Danish society about DKK 86 million per day.


People develop diabetes when the beta cells
in their pancreas do not produce enough insulin
to meet their body's needs.

New research from the University of Copenhagen
and Novo Nordisk A/S links this defect
to one particular cellular iron transporter.


"Iron is a vital mineral for the healthy functioning of the body and is found in many enzymes and proteins, for example, the red blood pigment that transports oxygen.

But iron can also promote the creation of toxic oxygen radicals. An increase in the iron content of the cells may cause tissue damage and disease.

We find that increased activity of a certain iron transporter causes damage to the beta cell. And if we completely remove this iron transporter in the beta cells in genetically engineered mice, they are indeed protected against diabetes," explains Professor Thomas Mandrup-Poulsen, Department of Biomedical Sciences, The Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences.

Surplus iron increases diabetes risk

Together with Christina Ellervik, Associate Professor and Professors Børge Nordestgaard and Henrik Birgens from the University of Copenhagen, Thomas Mandrup-Poulsen has previously documented a connection between surplus iron and diabetes risk, based on large population studies.


This is the first time that scientists have found
a link between inflammation and iron transport,
which appears to be the underlying cause
of the observed higher risk for diabetes.

"We need to conduct controlled clinical trials
showing that changes in the iron content
of the body can reduce the risk of diabetes.

Only then will we be able to advise people
at risk for diabetes not to take iron supplements,
or recommend drug treatment to reduce
the amount of iron in their body."

Thomas Mandrup-Poulsen


The evolutionary explanation

The team behind the scientific article in Cell Metabolism can see that the inflammatory signal substances created around the beta cells in both type-1 and type-2 diabetes accelerate the activity of the iron transporter.

"The evolutionary explanation of why the highly specialised beta cells are influenced by the inflammatory signal substances and contain the potentially dangerous iron transport proteins is presumably that the short-term increase in the amount of oxygen radicals is critical to the fine-tuning of insulin production during bouts of fever and stress.

However, nature had not foreseen the long-term local production of signal substances around the beta cells, which we see in type-1 and type-2 diabetes," continues Dr. Mandrup-Poulsen.


The new results have implications for many scientists,
not only those conducting research in diabetes.

The beta cell can be used as a model for other cells
that are particularly sensitive to iron,
such as liver cells and cardiac-muscle cells.


Original article: http://news.ku.dk/all_news/2012/2012.9/cause-of-diabetes-may-be-linked-to-iron-transport/