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Pregnancy Timeline by SemestersFemale Reproductive SystemFertilizationThe Appearance of SomitesFirst TrimesterSecond TrimesterThird TrimesterFetal liver is producing blood cellsHead may position into pelvisBrain convolutions beginFull TermWhite fat begins to be madeWhite fat begins to be madeHead may position into pelvisImmune system beginningImmune system beginningPeriod of rapid brain growthBrain convolutions beginLungs begin to produce surfactantSensory brain waves begin to activateSensory brain waves begin to activateInner Ear Bones HardenBone marrow starts making blood cellsBone marrow starts making blood cellsBrown fat surrounds lymphatic systemFetal sexual organs visibleFinger and toe prints appearFinger and toe prints appearHeartbeat can be detectedHeartbeat can be detectedBasic Brain Structure in PlaceThe Appearance of SomitesFirst Detectable Brain WavesA Four Chambered HeartBeginning Cerebral HemispheresEnd of Embryonic PeriodEnd of Embryonic PeriodFirst Thin Layer of Skin AppearsThird TrimesterDevelopmental Timeline
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October 4, 2012--------News Archive Return to: News Alerts

A.
B.
C.


For invitro-fertilization:
(A.) A woman must receive injections (which can be administered
at home by her partner) that increase her egg production.

(B.) Then her eggs must be collected under hospital conditions
and then be screened for suitability by a laboratory.

(C.) Suitable eggs are then injected with the father's sperm
under the microscope, before readmission into the uterus.

WHO Child Growth Charts

       

Fear Stresses Women Undergoing Fertility Therapy

A study of European countries with the highest number of assisted reproduction cycles identifies which aspects of reproduction treatment contribute to psychological stress

Inability to conceive is extremely stressful for women who want to have a family. This notion is shown by a study published in the 'Human Reproduction' journal on patients in four countries with the highest number of cases of assisted reproduction cycles in Europe: France, Germany, Italy and Spain.

The report is published in the journal Human Reproduction.

"Infertility causes a series of varied emotions that have a negative impact on important aspects of a woman's life," as explained to SINC by Juan García Velasco, one of the authors of the study, who is also director of the Infertility Institute of Valencia and lecturer in Obstetrics and Gynaecology at the Rey Juan Carlos de Madrid University. "It is linked to depression, anxiety, anger, cognitive imbalance and low self-esteem," he adds.


The study not only analyses the emotional impact
of infertility on women but also identifies
those aspects of ovary stimulation
that contribute to the physical and psychological
stress suffered by many patients.


The 445 women between the ages of 18 and 44 years taking part in the study had experienced difficulties in conceiving.

While some had never undergone any fertility treatment, others were receiving it at the time or had already received it in the past two years.

Almost a third of the participants said they began to worry from the moment in which they started trying to get pregnant and nearly half claimed to have felt ashamed or like a failure as a woman.


It was found that anxiety toward injections,
and fear of deterioration of their relationship
with their partner, were the main causes of stress.


In this respect, the women who actually received treatment said that they got closer to their partner (33% compared to 19%). The majority of participants felt that their partner supported them, especially those that received fertility therapy (63%).

Women undergoing treatment said they were more anxious when it comes to sex and negative emotions, such as impatience or frustration. Whereas those not having treatment said they felt "confused" and those undergoing treatment claimed to mostly feel "vulnerable and exhausted".


Despite being aware of the limitations of age,
68% of infertile women never thought
they would have a problem conceiving.


According to García Velasco, "in order to overcome the physical and psychological challenges that such treatment implies, some form of protocol would be necessary that involves a minimal number of injections and an increase in readily available information in order to reduce stress and increase patient satisfaction."

Waiting two years to start treatment

García Velasco outlines that "infertility can significantly affect women's lives and their personal relationships. However, despite its negative impact, many of those women trying to conceive do not seek medical help."

The reason why women wait for an average of two years before starting treatment is that they want to wait to see if they can conceive naturally. The authors believe that this waiting period causes anxiety and regret and almost 58% of participants feel that they waited too long.


"Our results show the need to educate women
to eradicate fear and better prepare them
for the demands of treatment and
its associated emotional effects."

Juan García Velasco


References:
Alice Domar, Keith Gordon, Juan Garcia-Velasco, Antonio La Marca, Paul Barriere, Fabiola Beligotti. "Understanding the perceptions of and emotional barriers to infertility treatment: a survey in four European countries". Human Reproduction, Vol.27, No.4 pp. 1073, 2012

Original article: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2012-10/f-sf-fot100312.php