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Pregnancy Timeline by SemestersFemale Reproductive SystemFertilizationThe Appearance of SomitesFirst TrimesterSecond TrimesterThird TrimesterFetal liver is producing blood cellsHead may position into pelvisBrain convolutions beginFull TermWhite fat begins to be madeWhite fat begins to be madeHead may position into pelvisImmune system beginningImmune system beginningPeriod of rapid brain growthBrain convolutions beginLungs begin to produce surfactantSensory brain waves begin to activateSensory brain waves begin to activateInner Ear Bones HardenBone marrow starts making blood cellsBone marrow starts making blood cellsBrown fat surrounds lymphatic systemFetal sexual organs visibleFinger and toe prints appearFinger and toe prints appearHeartbeat can be detectedHeartbeat can be detectedBasic Brain Structure in PlaceThe Appearance of SomitesFirst Detectable Brain WavesA Four Chambered HeartBeginning Cerebral HemispheresEnd of Embryonic PeriodEnd of Embryonic PeriodFirst Thin Layer of Skin AppearsThird TrimesterDevelopmental Timeline
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October 10, 2012--------News Archive Return to: News Alerts


Further research is needed to pinpoint magnesium sulfate's broader
applicability beyond pregnanacy and for diseases of inflammation.

WHO Child Growth Charts

       

Therapy for Preterm Labor May Help Other Inflammatory Conditions

Magnesium sulfate is given to many pregnant women to treat preterm labor and preeclampsia and was recently shown to prevent cerebral palsy – however little was known about how it works

Researchers at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have recently uncovered the mechanism by which magnesium reduces the production of cytokines. Cytokines are molecules responsible for regulating inflammation and are a category of molecules extensive in intercellular communication. They play a key role conditions, such as diabetes, obesity, atherosclerosis, asthma, and alcoholic liver disease and cirrhosis.

Although the study was targeted to pregnancy, inflammation is the culprit of many conditions. Learning more about a patient's magnesium levels was reasoned to be of help to a broader population.

The study is published in The Journal of Immunology, by work from the laboratories of Helene Bernstein, MD, PhD, and Andrea Romani, MD, PhD.


It was found that magnesium decreases inflammation
by reducing the activity of cells' primary protein,
Nuclear Factor Kappa Beta (NF-kB),
and the subsequent production of cytokines.

This new insight offers a promising new
immunotherapeutic strategy by which a simple nutrient,
known to be safe based on its extensive use in obstetrics,
can decrease inflammation in other conditions,
including sepsis, respiratory distress syndrome,
asthma, atherosclerosis, diabetes and cancer.

The cost of all of these disease treatments in the
United States exceeds $200 billion annually.


"We really didn't understand how or why magnesium worked, which was frustrating for both physicians and patients. As cytokines levels at birth are the strongest predictor of cerebral palsy and are associated with preterm birth, we asked whether magnesium influences cytokine production. The concept that such a small molecule decreases inflammation is exciting and relevant to other diseases. Now that we understand how magnesium functions, we can figure out how to make it work even better," says Dr. Bernstein, associate professor of reproductive biology and molecular biology and microbiology, Case Western Reserve School of Medicine, OB/GYN at University Hospitals MacDonald Women's Hospital, and senior author of the study.

The physician-scientists are now examining how magnesium could be used therapeutically, looking at factors including dosage, timing, frequency, and delivery method. Further research is needed to pinpoint magnesium sulfate's broader applicability.

"The last decade has registered an incredible progress in understanding the basics of magnesium homeostasis both at the cellular and whole body level. Yet, a significant gap still exists when our knowledge about magnesium is compared to that of calcium, sodium, potassium, or hydrogen. As efforts continue to elucidate magnesium regulation and effects, more effective 'therapeutic approaches' will become applicable to patient health care," says Andrea Romani, MD, PhD, associate professor of physiology and biophysics, Case Western Reserve School of Medicine and first author of the study.

Founded in 1843, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine is the largest medical research institution in Ohio and is among the nation's top medical schools for research funding from the National Institutes of Health. The School of Medicine is recognized throughout the international medical community for outstanding achievements in teaching. The School's innovative and pioneering Western Reserve2 curriculum interweaves four themes--research and scholarship, clinical mastery, leadership, and civic professionalism--to prepare students for the practice of evidence-based medicine in the rapidly changing health care environment of the 21st century. Eleven Nobel Laureates have been affiliated with the school.

Annually, the School of Medicine trains more than 800 M.D. and M.D./Ph.D. students and ranks in the top 25 among U.S. research-oriented medical schools as designated by U.S. News & World Report "Guide to Graduate Education."

The School of Medicine's primary affiliate is University Hospitals Case Medical Center and is additionally affiliated with MetroHealth Medical Center, the Louis Stokes Cleveland Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, and the Cleveland Clinic, with which it established the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University in 2002.

Original article: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2012-10/cwru-plp100912.php