Welcome to The Visible Embryo

Home- - -History-- -Bibliography- -Pregnancy Timeline- --Prescription Drugs in Pregnancy- -- Pregnancy Calculator- --Female Reproductive System- News Alerts -Contact

Welcome to The Visible Embryo, a comprehensive educational resource on human development from conception to birth.

The Visible Embryo provides visual references for changes in fetal development throughout pregnancy and can be navigated via fetal development or maternal changes.

The National Institutes of Child Health and Human Development awarded Phase I and Phase II Small Business Innovative Research Grants to develop The Visible Embryo. Initally designed to evaluate the internet as a teaching tool for first year medical students, The Visible Embryo is linked to over 600 educational institutions and is viewed by more than ' million visitors each month.


WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform
The World Health Organization (WHO) has created a new Web site to help researchers, doctors and patients obtain reliable information on high-quality clinical trials. Now you can go to one website and search all registers to identify clinical trial research underway around the world!



Home

History

Bibliography

Pregnancy Timeline

Prescription Drug Effects on Pregnancy

Pregnancy Calculator

Female Reproductive System

Contact The Visible Embryo

News Archive
Disclaimer: The Visible Embryo web site is provided for your general information only. The information contained on this site should not be treated as a substitute for medical, legal or other professional advice. Neither is The Visible Embryo responsible or liable for the contents of any websites of third parties which are listed on this site.
Content protected under a Creative Commons License.

No dirivative works may be made or used for commercial purposes.

Return To Top Of Page
Pregnancy Timeline by SemestersFemale Reproductive SystemFertilizationThe Appearance of SomitesFirst TrimesterSecond TrimesterThird TrimesterFetal liver is producing blood cellsHead may position into pelvisBrain convolutions beginFull TermWhite fat begins to be madeWhite fat begins to be madeHead may position into pelvisImmune system beginningImmune system beginningPeriod of rapid brain growthBrain convolutions beginLungs begin to produce surfactantSensory brain waves begin to activateSensory brain waves begin to activateInner Ear Bones HardenBone marrow starts making blood cellsBone marrow starts making blood cellsBrown fat surrounds lymphatic systemFetal sexual organs visibleFinger and toe prints appearFinger and toe prints appearHeartbeat can be detectedHeartbeat can be detectedBasic Brain Structure in PlaceThe Appearance of SomitesFirst Detectable Brain WavesA Four Chambered HeartBeginning Cerebral HemispheresEnd of Embryonic PeriodEnd of Embryonic PeriodFirst Thin Layer of Skin AppearsThird TrimesterDevelopmental Timeline
Click weeks 0 - 40 and follow fetal growth
Search artcles published since 2007

October 29, 2012--------News Archive Return to: News Alerts


A non-catalytic subunit of the mRNA decapping complex (green),
is found in both the cytoplasm and the nucleus
(co-localizing with chromatin--blue) in embryonic stem cells.


WHO Child Growth Charts

       

Solving Stem Cell Mysteries

Using a combination of genetic, protein-oriented and physiological approaches involving mouse embryonic stem cells, researchers have uncovered a mechanism that integrates all three networks involved in embryonic stem cell self-renewal and provide a critical missing link to understanding this process

The ability of embryonic stem cells to differentiate into different types of cells with different functions is regulated and maintained by a complex series of chemical interactions, which are not well understood

Learning more about this process could prove useful for stem cell-based therapies down the road. New research from a team led by Carnegie’s Yixian Zheng is zeroing in on the process by which stem cells maintain their proper undifferentiated state.

Their results are published in Cell October 26.


Embryonic stem cells go through a process called
self-renewal, wherein they undergo multiple cycles
of division while not differentiating into any other
type of cells. This process is dependent on three
protein networks, which guide both self-renewal and
eventual differentiation. But the integration of
these three networks has remained a mystery.


Using a combination of genetic, protein-oriented and physiological approaches involving mouse embryonic stem cells, the team—which also included current and former Carnegie scientists Junling Jia, Xiaobin Zheng, Junqi Zhang, Anying Zhang, and Hao Jiang—uncovered a mechanism that integrates all three networks involved in embryonic stem cell self-renewal and provide a critical missing link to understanding this process.


The key is a protein called Utf1.

It serves three important roles. First, it balances
between activating and deactivating the necessary
genes to direct the cell toward differentiation.

At the same time, it acts on messenger RNA that is
the transcription product of the genes when they’re
activated by tagging it for degradation, rather than
allowing it to continue to serve its cellular function.

Lastly, it blocks a genetic feedback loop that normally
inhibits cellular proliferation, allowing it to occur in the
rapid nature characteristic of embryonic stem cells.


“We are slowly but surely growing to understand the physiology of embryonic stem cells,” Zheng said. “It is crucial that we continue to carrying out basic research on how these cells function.”

Non-Carnegie co-authors on the paper include Gangquing Hu, Kairong Cui, Chengyu Liu and Keji Zhao of the National Institutes of Health; and John Yates III and Bingwen Lu of the Scripps Research Institute, the latter of whom is now at Pfizer.

This research was supported by NIH, NHLBI intramural research, HHMI, and the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Therapeutics Inc.

Original article: http://carnegiescience.edu/news/solving_stem_cell_mysteries