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Pregnancy Timeline by SemestersFemale Reproductive SystemFertilizationThe Appearance of SomitesFirst TrimesterSecond TrimesterThird TrimesterFetal liver is producing blood cellsHead may position into pelvisBrain convolutions beginFull TermWhite fat begins to be madeWhite fat begins to be madeHead may position into pelvisImmune system beginningImmune system beginningPeriod of rapid brain growthBrain convolutions beginLungs begin to produce surfactantSensory brain waves begin to activateSensory brain waves begin to activateInner Ear Bones HardenBone marrow starts making blood cellsBone marrow starts making blood cellsBrown fat surrounds lymphatic systemFetal sexual organs visibleFinger and toe prints appearFinger and toe prints appearHeartbeat can be detectedHeartbeat can be detectedBasic Brain Structure in PlaceThe Appearance of SomitesFirst Detectable Brain WavesA Four Chambered HeartBeginning Cerebral HemispheresEnd of Embryonic PeriodEnd of Embryonic PeriodFirst Thin Layer of Skin AppearsThird TrimesterDevelopmental Timeline
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November 15, 2012--------News Archive Return to: News Alerts


Label warning for Triclosan


Facts about triclosan

* used to prevent bacterial growth

* does not work against all types of bacteria

* added mostly to cosmetic products such as toothpaste, deodorant and soap

* also added to kitchen utensils and textiles

* little triclosan is absorbed through the skin

* significant absorption through the mucous membranes in the mouth (toothpaste)

* has been in use for over 40 years in some products

* from animal experiments we know that triclosan acts to reinforce
the development of Immunoglobulin (IgE) towards allergens









WHO Child Growth Charts

       

Triclosan in Cosmetics, Personal Care Products Increases Allergy Risk

Triclosan - an antibacterial chemical found in toothpaste and other products - can contribute to an increased risk of allergy development in children. This comes from the Norwegian Environment and Childhood Asthma Study, in which the Norwegian Institute of Public Health is involved. Similar results are reported in the USA


Triclosan has been in use for decades, but was
recently associated with allergies in children in an
American study, the National Health and Nutrition
Examination Survey
(NHANES).

The new Norwegian study found similar
associations between allergies and triclosan
levels measured in children's urine.


The study found that triclosan levels measured in urine were associated with elevated levels of Immunoglobulin E (IgE) and rhinitis (blocked nose/hay fever) in 10 year-olds.

623 urine samples were collected and measured at the Center for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, USA. Approximately 50 per cent of the Norwegian children had detectable levels of triclosan, while 80 per cent of American children had measurable levels. The children had approximately the same amount of triclosan exposure.


Triclosan can change the bacterial flora on
the skin, in the mouth and in the intestines.

A change in the bacterial composition of
"good" bacteria can cause an increased risk of
developing allergies (hygiene hypothesis).

Therefore, increased use of triclosan and
antibacterial products has generally been
associated with an increased
incidence of allergies.


Reduce consumption

For many years, the health authorities in Norway have called for a reduction in the use of antibacterial products to prevent the development of resistant bacteria.

In a study of triclosan use in Norway in 2001, it was found that 85 per cent of the total amount of triclosan came from cosmetic products, of which 75 per cent were toothpaste. Since this study, triclosan has been removed from a variety of products.


The extent to which Norwegian children are exposed
to triclosan today is uncertain. In the USA, where
there is annual sampling and monitoring of chemical
exposure, there is little evidence that exposure
to triclosan is being reduced.


Additional Reading

FDA: Triclosan: What Consumers Should Know

About the study
The triclosan study is a collaboration between the Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo University Hospital and the National Institute of Health Sciences (NIEHS) in the USA, where Randi Bertelsen is currently a guest researcher. The project is partly funded by the Research Council of Norway's programme for Environmental Exposures and Health Outcomes.

Reference
Bertelsen RJ, Longnecker MP, Løvik M, Calafat AM, Carlsen K-H, London SJ, Lødrup Carlsen KC. Triclosan exposure and allergic sensitization in Norwegian children. Allergy 2012; DOI: 10.1111/all.12058.

Original article: http://www.fhi.no/eway/default.aspx?pid=238&trg=MainLeft_
5895&MainArea_5811=5895:0:15,5242:1:0:0:::0:0&MainLeft_5895=5825:
100119::1:5896:1:::0:0