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Pregnancy Timeline by SemestersFemale Reproductive SystemFertilizationThe Appearance of SomitesFirst TrimesterSecond TrimesterThird TrimesterFetal liver is producing blood cellsHead may position into pelvisBrain convolutions beginFull TermWhite fat begins to be madeWhite fat begins to be madeHead may position into pelvisImmune system beginningImmune system beginningPeriod of rapid brain growthBrain convolutions beginLungs begin to produce surfactantSensory brain waves begin to activateSensory brain waves begin to activateInner Ear Bones HardenBone marrow starts making blood cellsBone marrow starts making blood cellsBrown fat surrounds lymphatic systemFetal sexual organs visibleFinger and toe prints appearFinger and toe prints appearHeartbeat can be detectedHeartbeat can be detectedBasic Brain Structure in PlaceThe Appearance of SomitesFirst Detectable Brain WavesA Four Chambered HeartBeginning Cerebral HemispheresEnd of Embryonic PeriodEnd of Embryonic PeriodFirst Thin Layer of Skin AppearsThird TrimesterDevelopmental Timeline
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November 19, 2012--------News Archive Return to: News Alerts


Scientists are now working to find how early in pregnancy vitamin C deficiency
influences fetal brain development. Preliminary results suggest the impact occurs
prior to the second and third trimester as damage is found then in guinea pig fetuses.










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Fetus Suffers when Mother Lacks Vitamin C

Maternal vitamin C deficiency during pregnancy can inflict serious consequences on the fetal brain. Once brain damage has occurred, it cannot be reversed by vitamin C supplements after birth

New research at the University of Copenhagen, just published in the scientific journal PLOS ONE, show how critical vitamin C supplements are during pregnancy. Population studies show that between 10-20 per cent of all adults in the developed world suffer from vitamin C deficiency. Therefore, pregnant women should think twice about omitting the daily vitamin pill.


“Even marginal vitamin C deficiency in the mother stunts the foetal hippocampus, the important memory centre, by 10-15 per cent, preventing the brain from optimal development,” says Professor Jens Lykkesfeldt. He heads the group of scientists that reached this conclusion by studying pregnant guinea pigs and their pups.

Just like humans, guinea pigs cannot produce vitamin C themselves, which is why they were chosen as the model.


“We used to think that the mother could protect the baby. Ordinarily there is a selective transport from mother to fetus of the substances the baby needs during pregnancy. However, it now appears that the transport is not sufficient in the case of vitamin C deficiency. Therefore it is extremely important to draw attention to this problem, which potentially can have serious consequences for the children affected,” says Jens Lykkesfeldt.


The new results sharpen the focus on the mother’s
lifestyle and nutritional status during pregnancy.

The new study has also shown that the damage
done to the foetal brain cannot be repaired,
even if the baby is given vitamin C after birth.


When the vitamin C deficient guinea pig pups were born, scientists divided them into two groups and gave one group vitamin C supplements. However, when the pups were two months old, which corresponds to teenage in humans, there was still no improvement in the group that had been given supplements.

The scientists are now working to find out how early in the pregnancy vitamin C deficiency influences the development of fetal guinea pigs. Preliminary results show that the impact is already made early in the pregnancy, as the fetuses were examined in the second and third trimesters. Scientists hope in the long term to be able to use population studies to illuminate the problem in humans.


Groups particularly vulnerable of vitamin C deficiency:

“People with low economic status who eat poorly -
and perhaps also smoke - often suffer from vitamin C
deficiency. Their children risk being born with a poorly
developed memory potential, may encounter learning
problems, and seen in a societal context, history repeats
itself because these children find it more difficult to
escape the environment into which they are born,”
says Jens Lykkesfeldt.

Lykkesfeldt emphasises that if pregnant women eat
a varied diet, do not smoke, and take a multi-vitamin
tablet daily during pregnancy, there is no reason to fear
vitamin C deficiency.

“Because it takes so little to avoid vitamin C deficiency,
it is my hope that both politicians and the authorities
will become aware that this can be a potential problem,”
concludes Jens Lykkesfeldt.


Original article: http://news.ku.dk/all_news/2012/2012.11/foetus-suffers-when-mother-lacks-vitamin-c/