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November 23, 2012--------News Archive Return to: News Alerts


Danish researchers have created a 3D culture medium based in gelatine,
to better grow pancreatic beta cells from stem cells.

Photo: Joan Goulley









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Stem Cells Develop Best in 3D

Scientists from The Danish Stem Cell Center (DanStem) at the University of Copenhagen, have discovered how stem cells develop best in a three-dimensional environment in order to grow into insulin-producing cells

In the long term this new knowledge can improve diabetes treatment with cell therapy. The results have just been published in the scientific journal Cell Reports.


Stem cells are responsible for tissue growth
and tissue repair after injury.

Therefore, the discovery that these vital cells
grow better in a three-dimensional environment
is important for the future treatment
of disease with stem cell therapy.


"We can see that the quality of the cells produced two-dimensionally is not good enough. By putting the cells in a three-dimensional environment and giving them the proper growth conditions, we get much better results. Therefore we are developing a three-dimensional culture medium in gelatine in the laboratory to mimic the one inside an embryo," says Professor Anne Grapin-Botton from DanStem at the University of Copenhagen, who produced the results together with colleagues from Switzerland and Belgium.


The international research team hopes their
development of a three-dimensional cell growth
environmental system can make a significant
contribution to the development of cell
therapies for treating diabetes.

In the long term this knowledge can also
be used to develop stem cell treatments for
chronic diseases in internal organs such as the
liver or lungs. Like the pancreas, these organs
are best developed from stem cells in 3D.

The research team has investigated how the
three-dimensional organisation of tissue in the
early embryonic stages influences development
of stem cells into more specialised cells.


"We can see that the pancreas looks like a beautiful little tree with branches. Stem cells along the branches need this structure to be able to create insulin-producing cells in the embryo. Our research suggests that in the laboratory beta cells can develop better from stem cells in 3D than if we try to get them to develop flat in a Petri dish," explains Professor Grapin-Botton.

"Attempts to develop functional beta cells in 2D have unfortunately most often resulted in poorly functioning cells. Our results from developing cells in 3D have yielded promising results and are therefore an important step on the way to developing cell therapies for treating diabetes."

The research is supported by the Novo Nordisk Foundation, Swiss National Research Foundation, and the National Institute of Health (NIH), USA.

The results from the paper "Planar Cell Polarity Controls Pancreatic Beta Cell Differentiation and Glucose Homeostasis" have just been published in the scientific journal Cell Reports.

Original article:
http://news.ku.dk/all_news/2012/2012.11/stem_cells_develop_best_in_3d/