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The National Institutes of Child Health and Human Development awarded Phase I and Phase II Small Business Innovative Research Grants to develop The Visible Embryo in 1993 as a first generation internet teaching tool consolidating human embryology teaching for first year medical students.

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December 28, 2012--------News Archive Return to: News Alerts


T
he immune system produces various types of cells to defend the body against
pathogens, cancer cells, and foreign substances. Now scientists have found that
each tissue has its own speciaized complement of T cells.








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First Ever 'Atlas' of T Cells in Human Body

By analyzing tissues harvested from organ donors, researchers have created the first ever "atlas" of immune cells in the human body

Their results provide a unique view of the distribution and function of T lymphocytes in healthy individuals. In addition, the findings represent a major step toward development of new strategies for creating vaccines and immunotherapies.

The study was published today in the online edition of the journal Immunity.

T cells, a type of white blood cell, play a major role in cell-mediated immunity, in which the immune system produces various types of cells to defend the body against pathogens, cancer cells, and foreign substances.


"We found that T cells are highly compartmentalized — that is, each tissue we examined had its own complement
of T cells. The results were remarkably similar in all
donors, even though these people were very different
in terms of age, background, and lifestyle."


Donna L. Farber, PhD
study leader, professor of surgical sciences
Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC)
principal investigator, new Columbia Center for Translational Immunology (CCTI), directed by Megan Sykes, MD

The researchers also discovered a receptor expressed
on the surface of "tissue-resident" T cells
but not on circulating T cells.

Using this marker, Dr. Farber and her colleagues
established that the blood is its own compartment.

"In other words, T cells found in circulation
are not the same as T cells in the tissues."

Dr. Farber


According to the researchers, the findings establish a baseline for T-cell immunity in healthy individuals. This knowledge can be used to better understand how various tissues respond to site-specific and systemic autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. The findings can therefore powerfully inform the development of new vaccine strategies.

Farber: "To make better vaccines, it may be necessary to activate a T-cell response at the site of an infection, not just in the general circulation. "But first we have to know what types of immune cells are in those tissues and how they function. This is a first step in that direction."

To study T cells, researchers need multiple tissue samples, which cannot be taken from healthy individuals. Working with the New York Organ Donor Network, the organ procurement organization for the greater New York metropolitan area, CUMC researchers obtained tissue samples from 24 individual organ donors. Samples were taken from tissues that have direct contact with pathogens, including lymph, lung, spleen, and small and large intestines. The donors, all of whom had died suddenly of traumatic causes, ranged in age from 15 to 60. All were HIV-negative and free of cancer and other chronic or immunological diseases.


"Most of what we have known about human T cells is
based on studies of the blood, because it is so accessible
.
But that is only a small sampling of the body's T cells.

We already had good evidence, from mouse studies, that
other tissues have their own types of T cells and that they
play an important role in mediating immune protection.

We wanted to find out if this was the case in humans."

Dr. Farber


The title of the paper is "Distribution and compartmentalization of human circulating and tissue-resident memory T cell subsets." The other contributors are Taheri Sathaliyawala (CUMC), Masaru Kubota (CUMC), Naomi Yudanin (CUMC), Damian Turner (CUMC), Philip Camp (CUMC), Joseph J. C. Thome (CUMC), Kara L. Bickham (CUMC), Harvey Lerner (New York Organ Donor Network, New York, NY), Michael Goldstein (New York Organ Donor Network and Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY), Megan Sykes (CUMC), and Tomoaki Kato (CUMC).

Study was supported by the National Institutes of Health (grant # RC1AI086164 ).

The authors declare no financial or other conflicts of interest.

Columbia University Medical Center provides international leadership in basic, pre-clinical and clinical research; medical and health sciences education; and patient care. The medical center trains future leaders and includes the dedicated work of many physicians, scientists, public health professionals, dentists, and nurses at the College of Physicians and Surgeons, the Mailman School of Public Health, the College of Dental Medicine, the School of Nursing, the biomedical departments of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, and allied research centers and institutions. Established in 1767, Columbia's College of Physicians and Surgeons was the first institution in the United States to grant the MD degree and is among the country's most selective medical schools. Columbia University Medical Center is home to the largest medical research enterprise in New York City and State and one of the largest in the United States. www.cumc.columbia.edu

Original article: http://www.cumc.columbia.edu/news-room/2012/12/20/first-ever-atlas-of-t-cells-in-human-body/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=first-ever-atlas-of-t-cells-in-human-body