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Pregnancy Timeline by SemestersFetal liver is producing blood cellsHead may position into pelvisBrain convolutions beginFull TermWhite fat begins to be madeWhite fat begins to be madeHead may position into pelvisImmune system beginningImmune system beginningPeriod of rapid brain growthBrain convolutions beginLungs begin to produce surfactantSensory brain waves begin to activateSensory brain waves begin to activateInner Ear Bones HardenBone marrow starts making blood cellsBone marrow starts making blood cellsBrown fat surrounds lymphatic systemFetal sexual organs visibleFinger and toe prints appearFinger and toe prints appearHeartbeat can be detectedHeartbeat can be detectedBasic Brain Structure in PlaceThe Appearance of SomitesFirst Detectable Brain WavesA Four Chambered HeartBeginning Cerebral HemispheresFemale Reproductive SystemEnd of Embryonic PeriodEnd of Embryonic PeriodFirst Thin Layer of Skin AppearsThird TrimesterSecond TrimesterFirst TrimesterFertilizationDevelopmental Timeline
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Home | Pregnancy Timeline | News Alerts |News Archive Sep 16, 2013

 

yeast immune to ageing

Three generations of yeast cells from the mother cell (green)
via two daughters (red) to four granddaughter cells.© MPI f.
Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics





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Immune to ageing

While ageing remains an inevitable fact of life, Max Planck researchers have discovered a microbe that stays forever young by rejuvenating every time it reproduces. The findings provide fundamental insights into the mechanisms of ageing.

In general, even symmetrically dividing microbes do not split into two exactly identical halves. Detailed investigations revealed that there are mechanisms in place that ensure that one half receives older, often defective, cell material, whereas the other half is equipped with new fully-functional material.

So microbes produce offspring that is younger than the parent – like is the case with humans.


The research team showed that, unlike other species, the yeast Schizosaccheromyces pombe is immune to ageing when reproducing under favourable growth conditions.

When the yeast is treated well, it reproduces by splitting into two halves that both inherit their fair share of old cell material. As both cells get only half of the damaged material, they are both younger than before.


“The yeast is rejuvenated a bit every time it reproduces,” explains Iva Tolic-Norrelykke, research group leader at the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics in Dresden and lead investigator on the project.


Subjected to negative influences like chemicals or heat, the yeast cells split into a younger and an older half just like other cells.

While the older cells eventually died, their offspring survived long enough to reproduce even in harsh environments.


The findings highlight S. pombe as an interesting organism that could potentially serve as a model of certain non-ageing types of cells in humans, such as germ cells, stem cells and cancer cells.

The work is published in Current Biology, 12 September 2013, as "Fission yeast does not age under favorable conditions, but does so after stress."

Original press releas:http://www.mpg.de/7521694/immune_to_aging