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Pregnancy Timeline by SemestersFetal liver is producing blood cellsHead may position into pelvisBrain convolutions beginFull TermWhite fat begins to be madeWhite fat begins to be madeHead may position into pelvisImmune system beginningImmune system beginningPeriod of rapid brain growthBrain convolutions beginLungs begin to produce surfactantSensory brain waves begin to activateSensory brain waves begin to activateInner Ear Bones HardenBone marrow starts making blood cellsBone marrow starts making blood cellsBrown fat surrounds lymphatic systemFetal sexual organs visibleFinger and toe prints appearFinger and toe prints appearHeartbeat can be detectedHeartbeat can be detectedBasic Brain Structure in PlaceThe Appearance of SomitesFirst Detectable Brain WavesA Four Chambered HeartBeginning Cerebral HemispheresFemale Reproductive SystemEnd of Embryonic PeriodEnd of Embryonic PeriodFirst Thin Layer of Skin AppearsThird TrimesterSecond TrimesterFirst TrimesterFertilizationDevelopmental Timeline
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Home | Pregnancy Timeline | News Alerts |News Archive Oct 24, 2013

 

The Arabidopsis is a model plant used in many genetic studies.







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Genes in mitochondria have disproportionate effect

Plant and animal cells carry most of their genes on chromosomes in the nucleus. But in Arabidopsis, they also contain a small number of genes in the mitochondria outside the nucleus — which affect chemicals found in its leaves equal in proportion to nuclear genes.

New research from the University of California, Davis, shows that the tiny proportion of a cell's DNA that is located outside the cell nucleus has a disproportionately large effect on a cell's metabolism. The work, with the model plant Arabidopsis, may have implications for future treatments for inherited diseases in humans.

The influence of genes outside the nucleus was known to an earlier generation of field ecologists and crop breeders, said Dan Kliebenstein, professor in the UC Davis Department of Plant Sciences and Genome Center and senior author on the paper published Oct. 8 in the online journal eLife. This is the first time that the effect has been quantified with genomic research, he said.

Bindu Joseph, a postdoctoral researcher in Kliebenstein's lab, and Kliebenstein studied how variation in 25,000 nuclear genes and 200 mitochondrial genes affected the levels of thousands of individual chemicals, or metabolites, in leaf tissue from 316 Arabidopsis plants.


The scientists found that 80 percent of the chemicals in leaf tissue were directly affected by variations in mitochodrial genes — about the same proportion that were affected by variation among the much larger number of nuclear genes.

There were also indirect effects, where mitochondrial genes regulated the activity of nuclear genes that in turn affected metabolism.


"At first it's surprising, but at another level you almost expect it," Kliebenstein said. "These organelles produce energy and sugar for cells, so they are very important."

Similar effects could also occur in mammalian cells, Kliebenstein said.


This has implications for in vitro fertilization therapies aimed at preventing diseases caused by faulty mitochondria being passed from mother to child.

The British government recently proposed draft regulations for "three-parent embryos," created by taking a the nucleus from a fertilized egg and putting it into an egg cell from a third donor with its own set of mitochondria.

The technique has so far only been tested in animals.


"From what we can see in plants, there might be an issue, but it needs testing," Kliebenstein said.

Large population surveys that aim to link conditions such as obesity to specific genes should also take more account of organellar genes, he said.

Abstract
Understanding genome to phenotype linkages has been greatly enabled by genomic sequencing. However, most genome analysis is typically confined to the nuclear genome. We conducted a metabolomic QTL analysis on a reciprocal RIL population structured to examine how variation in the organelle genomes affects phenotypic variation. This showed that the cytoplasmic variation had effects similar to, if not larger than, the largest individual nuclear locus. Inclusion of cytoplasmic variation into the genetic model greatly increased the explained phenotypic variation. Cytoplasmic genetic variation was a central hub in the epistatic network controlling the plant metabolome. This epistatic influence manifested such that the cytoplasmic background could alter or hide pairwise epistasis between nuclear loci. Thus, cytoplasmic genetic variation plays a central role in controlling natural variation in metabolomic networks. This suggests that cytoplasmic genomes must be included in any future analysis of natural variation.

- See more at: http://elife.elifesciences.org/content/2/e00776#sthash.roFFYk7H.dpuf

Co-authors on the paper are graduate student Jason Corwin and project scientists Baohua Li and Suzi Atwell.

The work was supported by the National Science Foundation.

Original press release: http://news.ucdavis.edu/search/news_detail.lasso?id=10743