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Welcome to The Visible Embryo, a comprehensive educational resource on human development from conception to birth.

The Visible Embryo provides visual references for changes in fetal development throughout pregnancy and can be navigated via fetal development or maternal changes.

The National Institutes of Child Health and Human Development awarded Phase I and Phase II Small Business Innovative Research Grants to develop The Visible Embryo. Initally designed to evaluate the internet as a teaching tool for first year medical students, The Visible Embryo is linked to over 600 educational institutions and is viewed by more than ' million visitors each month.


WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform
The World Health Organization (WHO) has created a new Web site to help researchers, doctors and patients obtain reliable information on high-quality clinical trials. Now you can go to one website and search all registers to identify clinical trial research underway around the world!



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Disclaimer: The Visible Embryo web site is provided for your general information only. The information contained on this site should not be treated as a substitute for medical, legal or other professional advice. Neither is The Visible Embryo responsible or liable for the contents of any websites of third parties which are listed on this site.
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Pregnancy Timeline by SemestersFetal liver is producing blood cellsHead may position into pelvisBrain convolutions beginFull TermWhite fat begins to be madeWhite fat begins to be madeHead may position into pelvisImmune system beginningImmune system beginningPeriod of rapid brain growthBrain convolutions beginLungs begin to produce surfactantSensory brain waves begin to activateSensory brain waves begin to activateInner Ear Bones HardenBone marrow starts making blood cellsBone marrow starts making blood cellsBrown fat surrounds lymphatic systemFetal sexual organs visibleFinger and toe prints appearFinger and toe prints appearHeartbeat can be detectedHeartbeat can be detectedBasic Brain Structure in PlaceThe Appearance of SomitesFirst Detectable Brain WavesA Four Chambered HeartBeginning Cerebral HemispheresFemale Reproductive SystemEnd of Embryonic PeriodEnd of Embryonic PeriodFirst Thin Layer of Skin AppearsThird TrimesterSecond TrimesterFirst TrimesterFertilizationDevelopmental Timeline
Click weeks 0 - 40 and follow fetal growth
Google Search artcles published since 2007
 
August 12, 2011--------News Archive

Common Drugs Reduce Postpartum Breast Cancer
Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, including ibuprofen, have been found to reduce the severity of postpartum breast cancers in animal models.

“Good Fat” Most Prevalent in Thin Children
Study at Joslin Diabetes Center and Children's Hospital Boston finds boosting brown fat levels may combat obesity epidemic.


August 11, 2011--------News Archive

Flame Retardant in California Pregnant Women
California’s strict flammability regulations may have led to levels two times higher for California residents than for people in the rest of the country.

Paper Money Worldwide Contains Bisphenol A
Research results also found that the most likely source of the BPA in the currency is the thermal paper used in cash register receipts.


August 10, 2011--------News Archive

Clues to How Hearts, Intestines and Key Organs Form
A newly-identified protein may hold the key to keeping appetite and blood sugar in check, according to a study by York University researchers.

Human Cells Engineered To Act As Sphincter Muscles
Researchers have built the first functional anal sphincters in the laboratory, suggesting a potential future treatment for incontinence.


August 9, 2011--------News Archive

What Is Your Child's Allergy Risk?
In a first of its kind study, babies followed from birth to 4 years were found to have less allergy and asthma attacks when their moms were exposed to allergens.

Teaching Pediatricians When and How to Toilet Train
Potty training beginning at 18 months seems to be about average.


August 8, 2011--------News Archive

Why Women Suffer More Autoimmune Disease
The reason why diseases such as lupus, multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis strike women more frequently than men.

Potential New Eye Tumor Treatment Discovered
Mistakes in some microRNAs help cells lacking tumor-suppressing Rb protein to proliferate into retinoblastoma.

Amniotic Fluid Can Monitor Earlier Fetal Development
New technology help determine fetal health earlier.

WHO Child Growth Charts


Systemic lupus erythematosus is an autoimmune disease caused by the body’s immune system attacking its own tissues. Striking mostly African American women of childbearing age, it causes damage to joints, heart, liver, kidneys, and other organs.

Researchers at National Jewish Health have discovered a type of cell that may contribute to autoimmune disease. The findings also suggest why diseases such as lupus, multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis strike women more frequently than men.

The cells, a subset of immune-system B cells, make autoantibodies, which bind to and attack the body’s own tissue. The researchers report in the August 4, 2011, issue of the journal Blood, that they found higher levels of these cells in elderly female mice, young and old mice prone to autoimmune disease, and humans with autoimmune diseases. National Jewish Health has applied for a patent for a method to treat autoimmune disease by depleting these cells.

“We believe these cells could be useful in the diagnosis and treatment of autoimmune diseases, and may help us understand general mechanisms underlying autoimmunity,” said senior author Philippa Marrack, PhD, Professor of Immunology at National Jewish Health and an investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

Autoimmune diseases occur when the immune system begins attacking its own tissues rather than external pathogens. Several autoimmune diseases, including lupus, rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis, afflict women anywhere from two to 10 times as often as they do males. Although sex hormones are known to play a role in autoimmune disease, other factors are involved in these gender differences.

The research team came across the new cells when they were examining differential expression of X-chromosome genes in healthy male and female mice. They discovered a previously undescribed type of B cell, which expressed the cell-surface protein CD11c. The protein is an integrin, which helps cells attach to other cells or to an extracellular matrix. The researchers are not certain what role integrin might play in autoimmunity or if it is merely a marker for another mediator of autoimmunity.

These cells increase as healthy female mice age, but remain at constant low levels in healthy male mice. As a result, the researchers named the cells Age-associated B Cells or ABCs. The researchers also found higher levels of ABCs in young and old mice that are prone to autoimmune disease. They could detect the elevated ABC levels before any disease developed and even before autoantibodies appeared, suggesting a role for these cells in early detection of disease.

The researchers also found an almost identical type of cell in the blood of many human autoimmune patients. In women with rheumatoid arthritis the presence of these cells increased with age.

ABCs in mice produce antibodies against chromatin, the combination of proteins and DNA that make up chromosomes in the cell nucleus. When they depleted the ABCs in mice, autoantibody levels fell, suggesting a potential treatment for autoimmune diseases. National Jewish Health has applied for a patent on the method of depleting the cells to treat autoimmune disease.

The researchers also found that activation of these cells requires stimulation of TLR7, a cell-surface receptor involved in innate immune responses. The gene for TLR7 is located on the X chromosome. Women have two X chromosomes, men an X and a Y chromosome. Normally one copy of the X chromosome in women is silenced so that it does not produce excess protein. But the silencing is not always complete, and women commonly express elevated levels of some X-chromosome genes.

“Not only do these cells appear more frequently in females, their activation depends on a gene of which women have two copies and men only one,” said Anatoly V. Rubtsov, PhD, first author and postdoctoral fellow at National Jewish Health. “This could help us understand why women suffer many autoimmune diseases more often than men.”

Original article: http://www.nationaljewish.org/about/mediacenter/pressreleases/2011/cd11c/