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Welcome to The Visible Embryo, a comprehensive educational resource on human development from conception to birth.

The Visible Embryo provides visual references for changes in fetal development throughout pregnancy and can be navigated via fetal development or maternal changes.

The National Institutes of Child Health and Human Development awarded Phase I and Phase II Small Business Innovative Research Grants to develop The Visible Embryo. Initally designed to evaluate the internet as a teaching tool for first year medical students, The Visible Embryo is linked to over 600 educational institutions and is viewed by more than ' million visitors each month.


WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform
The World Health Organization (WHO) has created a new Web site to help researchers, doctors and patients obtain reliable information on high-quality clinical trials. Now you can go to one website and search all registers to identify clinical trial research underway around the world!



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Disclaimer: The Visible Embryo web site is provided for your general information only. The information contained on this site should not be treated as a substitute for medical, legal or other professional advice. Neither is The Visible Embryo responsible or liable for the contents of any websites of third parties which are listed on this site.
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Pregnancy Timeline by SemestersFetal liver is producing blood cellsHead may position into pelvisBrain convolutions beginFull TermWhite fat begins to be madeWhite fat begins to be madeHead may position into pelvisImmune system beginningImmune system beginningPeriod of rapid brain growthBrain convolutions beginLungs begin to produce surfactantSensory brain waves begin to activateSensory brain waves begin to activateInner Ear Bones HardenBone marrow starts making blood cellsBone marrow starts making blood cellsBrown fat surrounds lymphatic systemFetal sexual organs visibleFinger and toe prints appearFinger and toe prints appearHeartbeat can be detectedHeartbeat can be detectedBasic Brain Structure in PlaceThe Appearance of SomitesFirst Detectable Brain WavesA Four Chambered HeartBeginning Cerebral HemispheresFemale Reproductive SystemEnd of Embryonic PeriodEnd of Embryonic PeriodFirst Thin Layer of Skin AppearsThird TrimesterSecond TrimesterFirst TrimesterFertilizationDevelopmental Timeline
Click weeks 0 - 40 and follow fetal growth
Google Search artcles published since 2007
 
August 12, 2011--------News Archive

Common Drugs Reduce Postpartum Breast Cancer
Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, including ibuprofen, have been found to reduce the severity of postpartum breast cancers in animal models.

“Good Fat” Most Prevalent in Thin Children
Study at Joslin Diabetes Center and Children's Hospital Boston finds boosting brown fat levels may combat obesity epidemic.


August 11, 2011--------News Archive

Flame Retardant in California Pregnant Women
California’s strict flammability regulations may have led to levels two times higher for California residents than for people in the rest of the country.

Paper Money Worldwide Contains Bisphenol A
Research results also found that the most likely source of the BPA in the currency is the thermal paper used in cash register receipts.


August 10, 2011--------News Archive

Clues to How Hearts, Intestines and Key Organs Form
A newly-identified protein may hold the key to keeping appetite and blood sugar in check, according to a study by York University researchers.

Human Cells Engineered To Act As Sphincter Muscles
Researchers have built the first functional anal sphincters in the laboratory, suggesting a potential future treatment for incontinence..


August 9, 2011--------News Archive

What Is Your Child's Allergy Risk?
In a first of its kind study, babies followed from birth to 4 years were found to have less allergy and asthma attacks when their moms were exposed to allergens.

Teaching Pediatricians When and How to Toilet Train
Potty training beginning at 18 months seems to be about average.


August 8, 2011--------News Archive

Why Women Suffer More Autoimmune Disease
The reason why diseases such as lupus, multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis strike women more frequently than men.

Potential New Eye Tumor Treatment Discovered
Mistakes in some microRNAs help cells lacking tumor-suppressing Rb protein to proliferate into retinoblastoma.

Amniotic Fluid Can Monitor Earlier Fetal Development
New technology help determine fetal health earlier.

WHO Child Growth Charts


SNAP technology will allow future "at risk" pregnancies to be monitored more closely.

Researchers have demonstrated the feasibility of genetic analysis of amniotic fluid to determine the health of the fetus in-utero.

The procedure involves the focused analysis of genes by targeting those found in amniotic fluid using Standardized NanoArray PCR technology - or SNAP for short.

SNAP analysis could be used to monitor fetal development, enabling clinicians to determine very early in pregnancy whether fetal organ systems are developing normally. The study appears in the September issue of the Journal of Molecular Diagnostics.

Using a previously developed SNAP gene panel as proof of concept, investigators determined that 7 of the 21 genes assayed were expressed differently depending on fetal sex or gestational age.

Results were obtained from the fluid floating in the liquid above tissue culture preparations made from standard amniotic fluid taken between 15 to 20 weeks of gestation, when standard amniotic testing is performed.

"In the future, fetal gene expression panels could prove useful in prenatal care to evaluate function in cases of at-risk pregnancies and fetal pathologies," commented lead investigator Lauren J. Massingham, MD, Division of Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, Floating Hospital for Children at Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts.

According to investigators, further studies using this gene panel approach could help explain the complex immune pathways involved in the maternal-fetal relationship.

Dr. Massingham added, "Some genes in the current panel may prove to be useful components in a fetal gene expression panel. Future studies are warranted to identify additional genes to be incorporated, including inflammatory, developmental, and gastrointestinal genes. This technique could be optimized to examine specific genes instrumental in fetal organ system function, which could be a useful addition to prenatal care."

SNAP technology allows for the simultaneous assessment of tens to hundreds of genes from reduced and degraded nucleic acid samples, overcoming the concerns of processing only primary human samples.

Gene expression that varies by up to five orders of magnitude can be quantified using a single assay.

Investigators were from the Floating Hospital for Children at Tufts Medical Center, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, and Prevail Dx.

The article appears in the Journal of Molecular Diagnostics as "Proof of Concept Study to Assess Fetal Gene Expression in Amniotic Fluid by NanoArray PCR" by Lauren J. Massingham, Kirby L. Johnson, Diana W. Bianchi, Shermin Pei, Inga Peter, Janet M. Cowan, Umadevi Tantravahi, and Tom B. Morrison (doi: 10.1016/j.jmoldx.2011.05.008). It will appear in The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics, Volume 13, Issue 5 (September 2011) published by Elsevier.

Original press release: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2011-08/ehs-gao080211.php