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Welcome to The Visible Embryo, a comprehensive educational resource on human development from conception to birth.

The Visible Embryo provides visual references for changes in fetal development throughout pregnancy and can be navigated via fetal development or maternal changes.

The National Institutes of Child Health and Human Development awarded Phase I and Phase II Small Business Innovative Research Grants to develop The Visible Embryo. Initally designed to evaluate the internet as a teaching tool for first year medical students, The Visible Embryo is linked to over 600 educational institutions and is viewed by more than ' million visitors each month.


WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform
The World Health Organization (WHO) has created a new Web site to help researchers, doctors and patients obtain reliable information on high-quality clinical trials. Now you can go to one website and search all registers to identify clinical trial research underway around the world!



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Disclaimer: The Visible Embryo web site is provided for your general information only. The information contained on this site should not be treated as a substitute for medical, legal or other professional advice. Neither is The Visible Embryo responsible or liable for the contents of any websites of third parties which are listed on this site.
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Pregnancy Timeline by SemestersFetal liver is producing blood cellsHead may position into pelvisBrain convolutions beginFull TermWhite fat begins to be madeWhite fat begins to be madeHead may position into pelvisImmune system beginningImmune system beginningPeriod of rapid brain growthBrain convolutions beginLungs begin to produce surfactantSensory brain waves begin to activateSensory brain waves begin to activateInner Ear Bones HardenBone marrow starts making blood cellsBone marrow starts making blood cellsBrown fat surrounds lymphatic systemFetal sexual organs visibleFinger and toe prints appearFinger and toe prints appearHeartbeat can be detectedHeartbeat can be detectedBasic Brain Structure in PlaceThe Appearance of SomitesFirst Detectable Brain WavesA Four Chambered HeartBeginning Cerebral HemispheresFemale Reproductive SystemEnd of Embryonic PeriodEnd of Embryonic PeriodFirst Thin Layer of Skin AppearsThird TrimesterSecond TrimesterFirst TrimesterFertilizationDevelopmental Timeline
Click weeks 0 - 40 and follow fetal growth
Google Search artcles published since 2007
 
September 2, 2011--------News Archive

'Gene Overdose' Causes Extreme Thinness
Scientists have discovered a genetic cause of extreme thinness for the first time.

Genetics Meets Metabolomics
A closer look at each individual's metabolites might lead to a better estimation for that individual's risk for developing complex common diseases.

September 1, 2011--------News Archive

Parents’ Stress Leaves Marks on Children’s Genes
Epigenetics changes the expression of genes, and can induce long lasting changes in our children when they are exposed our to stress.

Gene Defect Linked to Disfiguring Disorder
The faulty gene responsible for Proteus syndrome, a rare disorder of uncontrolled growth of certain body tissues and organs, has been identified

August 31, 2011--------News Archive

Mom's Morning Sickness May Affect Infant Brain
Extreme morning sickness could lead to lifelong emotional, behavioral disorders in kids.

Stanford Invents Sutureless Joining of Blood Vessels
Sutures are difficult to use on blood vessels less than 1 mm wide. Now, Stanford University has a glue which works on extremely slim blood vessels 0.2 mm wide.

August 30, 2011--------News Archive

Bilingual Babies' Display Early Brain Differentiation
Babies and children are whizzes at learning a second language, but that ability begins to fade as early as their first birthday.

Mouse Model Brings New Ideas on Lafora Disease
Researchers at IRB Barcelona have demonstrated a link between abnormal sugar accumulation and the neuronal degeneration characteristic of Lafora disease.

August 29, 2011--------News Archive

Non Coding RNAs Direct Embryonic Development
Embryonic stem cells can either differentiate into cells of a specific lineage such as blood cells or neurons, or they can stay in a pluripotent state. Depending on RNAs.

Degrading One Protein Allows Cell to Divide
Found, a crucial element controlling segregation of genetic material from parent to daughter cells. Regulating CenH3 protein ensures correct cell division in Drosophila.

Going With the Flow
Egg cells develop through two asymmetric divisions, separating into daughter cells. Not with microtubules pulling at the centromeres, but through the flow of actin.

A Light Answer to the Heavy Question of Cell Growth
A technique offers insight into the much-debated problem of whether cells grow at a constant rate or exponentially.

WHO Child Growth Charts


Embryonic Cell dividing captured with a new imaging method called spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM). Photo by Quantitative Light Imaging Laboratory

Led by electrical and computer engineering professor Gabriel Popescu, a research team has developed a new imaging method called spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM) that can measure cell mass using two beams of light.

Described in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, the SLIM technique offers new insight into the much-debated problem of whether cells grow at a constant rate or exponentially.

SLIM is extremely sensitive, quantitatively measuring mass with femtogram accuracy. By comparison, a micron-sized droplet of water weighs 1,000 femtograms. It can measure the growth of a single cell, and even mass transport within the cell. Yet, the technique is broadly applicable.

“A significant advantage over existing methods is that we can measure all types of cells – bacteria, mammalian cells, adherent cells, nonadherent cells, single cells and populations,” said Mustafa Mir, a graduate student and a first author of the paper. “And all this while maintaining the sensitivity and the quantitative information that we get.”

Unlike most other cell-imaging techniques, SLIM – a combination of phase-contrast microscopy and holography – does not need staining or any other special preparation. Because it is completely non-invasive, the researchers can study cells as they go about their natural functions. It uses white light and can be combined with more traditional microscopy techniques, such as fluorescence, to monitor cells as they grow.

“We were able to combine more traditional methods with our method because this is just an add-on module to a commercial microscope,” Mir said. “Biologists can use all their old tricks and just add our module on top.”

Because of SLIM’s sensitivity, the researchers could monitor cells’ growth through different phases of the cell cycle. They found that mammalian cells show clear exponential growth only during the G2 phase of the cell cycle, after the DNA replicates and before the cell divides. This information has great implications not only for basic biology, but also for diagnostics, drug development and tissue engineering.

The researchers hope to apply their new knowledge of cell growth to different disease models. For example, they plan to use SLIM to see how growth varies between normal cells and cancer cells, and the effects of treatments on the growth rate.

Popescu, a member of the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology at the U. of I., is establishing SLIM as a shared resource on the Illinois campus, hoping to harness its flexibility for basic and clinical research in a number of areas.

“It could be used in many applications in both life sciences and materials science,” said Popescu, who also is a professor of physics and of bioengineering. “The interferometric information can translate to the topography of silicon wafers or semiconductors. It’s like an iPad – we have the hardware, and there are a number of different applications dedicated to specific problems of interest to different labs.”

Co-authors on the paper include graduate students Zhuo Wang, Zhen Shen and Michael Bednarz, along with electrical and computer engineering professor Rashid Bashir, physics professor Ido Golding and cell and developmental biology professor Supriya G. Prasanth.

The National Science Foundation and the Grainger Foundation supported this work.
Editor's note: To contact Gabriel Popescu, call 217-333-4840; email gpopescu@illinois.edu.

The paper, “Optical Measurement of Cycle-Dependent Cell Growth,” is available online.

Original article: http://news.illinois.edu/news/11/0825SLIM_GabrielPopescu.html