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Welcome to The Visible Embryo, a comprehensive educational resource on human development from conception to birth.

The Visible Embryo provides visual references for changes in fetal development throughout pregnancy and can be navigated via fetal development or maternal changes.

The National Institutes of Child Health and Human Development awarded Phase I and Phase II Small Business Innovative Research Grants to develop The Visible Embryo. Initally designed to evaluate the internet as a teaching tool for first year medical students, The Visible Embryo is linked to over 600 educational institutions and is viewed by more than ' million visitors each month.


WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform
The World Health Organization (WHO) has created a new Web site to help researchers, doctors and patients obtain reliable information on high-quality clinical trials. Now you can go to one website and search all registers to identify clinical trial research underway around the world!



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Disclaimer: The Visible Embryo web site is provided for your general information only. The information contained on this site should not be treated as a substitute for medical, legal or other professional advice. Neither is The Visible Embryo responsible or liable for the contents of any websites of third parties which are listed on this site.
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Pregnancy Timeline by SemestersFetal liver is producing blood cellsHead may position into pelvisBrain convolutions beginFull TermWhite fat begins to be madeWhite fat begins to be madeHead may position into pelvisImmune system beginningImmune system beginningPeriod of rapid brain growthBrain convolutions beginLungs begin to produce surfactantSensory brain waves begin to activateSensory brain waves begin to activateInner Ear Bones HardenBone marrow starts making blood cellsBone marrow starts making blood cellsBrown fat surrounds lymphatic systemFetal sexual organs visibleFinger and toe prints appearFinger and toe prints appearHeartbeat can be detectedHeartbeat can be detectedBasic Brain Structure in PlaceThe Appearance of SomitesFirst Detectable Brain WavesA Four Chambered HeartBeginning Cerebral HemispheresFemale Reproductive SystemEnd of Embryonic PeriodEnd of Embryonic PeriodFirst Thin Layer of Skin AppearsThird TrimesterSecond TrimesterFirst TrimesterFertilizationDevelopmental Timeline
Click weeks 0 - 40 and follow fetal growth
Google Search artcles published since 2007
 
September 9, 2011--------News Archive

Pregnancy Diet Influences Baby's Allergies
A possible link between what a mother eats during pregnancy and the risk of her child developing allergies has been identified.

When Do Infants Gain the Capacity for Pain?
The evidence suggests that developing brain networks become mature enough to identify pain as distinct from touch fairly late in development.

Early Motor Skill Training Jump Starts Infants
Study indicates infants at risk for autism could benefit from motor training.

September 8, 2011--------News Archive

Clue Found to Cause of Childhood Hydrocephalus
When it comes to the circuits that make up the olfactory system, it seems that sleep eliminates some smell receptors. Perhaps sleepless parenting of newborns preserves intense smell receptivity!

Sleep Controls Survival of "Smell" Neurons in Adults
When it comes to neurons that make up the olfactory system, it seems that sleep eliminates some smells. Perhaps sleepless parents are preserving intense smells!

Improving Treatment of Craniosynostosis
Craniosynostosis is a condition that causes the bone plates in the skull to fuse too soon.

September 7, 2011--------News Archive

In Socially Engaged Mice, White Fat Turns to Brown
Given an engaging place to live with greater opportunities for social stimulation, some energy-storing white fat is transformed to energy-burning brown fat.

Lifetime 'Dose' of Excess Weight Linked to Diabetes
Degree and duration of obesity in adolescents and young adults are important for type 2 diabetes risk, especially for Hispanics and blacks.

Mom's Use of Oxycodone Not Safe for Breastfeeding
Doctors have been prescribing codeine for postpartum pain management for many years. Until recently, it was considered safe to breastfeed while taking.

September 6, 2011--------News Archive

New Map of Where Tastes are Coded in the Brain
How Does the Brain Know What the Tongue Knows?

Phthalates and Decrease In Mental-Motor Growth
Phthalates are endocrine-disrupting chemicals widely present in the environment, and are linked to increased behavioral problems at age 3.

Missing Genes Separate Coach Potato from Action
You may think your lack of resolve to get off the couch to exercise is because you're lazy, but research has discovered it may be you are missing key genes.

September 5, 2011--------News Archive

Found, Gene Defect Predisposing You to Leukemia
Those at risk because of family history may soon obtain tests to detect the genetic error before symptoms emerge.

New Blood Sugar Control for Diabetes
Study finds inflammation may be part of the solution, not the problem.

WHO Child Growth Charts

Aclose-up of a bone marrow by Daniel E. Sabath, University of Washington (UW) professor of laboratory medicine.

Increased low-grade inflammation in the body resulting from obesity is widely viewed as contributing to type 2 diabetes.

Going against this long-held belief, researchers from Children's Hospital Boston report that two proteins activated by inflammation are actually crucial for maintaining good blood sugar levels – and that boosting the activity of these proteins can normalize blood sugar in severely obese and diabetic mice.

The research, led by Umut Ozcan, MD, in the Division of Endocrinology at Children's, is reported in the October issue of Nature Medicine, published online September 4.

"This finding is completely contrary to the general dogma in the diabetes field that low-grade inflammation in obesity causes insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes," says Ozcan. "For 20 years, this inflammation has been seen as detrimental, whereas it is actually beneficial."

Ozcan's team previously showed that obesity places stress on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), a structure in the cell where proteins are assembled, folded and dispatched to do jobs for the cell. This so-called "ER stress" impairs the body's response to insulin in maintaining appropriate blood glucose levels, and is a key link between obesity and type 2 diabetes.

Last year, Ozcan and colleagues showed that a protein that relieves ER stress, called XBP1s, cannot function in obese mice. Earlier this year, they showed that activating XBP1s artificially in the liver normalized high blood sugar in obese, insulin-resistant type 2 diabetic mice (as well as lean, insulin-deficient type 1 diabetic mice).

The new study shows that a second protein triggered by inflammatory signals, p38 MAPK, chemically alters XBP1s, enhancing its activity -- and that without these alterations, XBP1s cannot function to maintain normal glucose levels.

The study further showed that obese mice have reduced p38 MAPK activity, and that re-activating p38 MAPK in the liver reduced their ER stress, increased insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance, and significantly reduced blood glucose levels.

Together, the findings suggest that either increasing p38 MAPK activity -- despite its being an inflammatory signal -- or increasing XBP-1 activity by other means could represent new therapeutic options for diabetes.

The study also suggests a new model for understanding type 2 diabetes, in which obesity may interfere with the ability of people's cells to respond to inflammatory signals.

"It may be that inflammatory pathways are not working optimally and there could be a resistance to cytokines which mediates the inflammation," Ozcan says. "This could be a paradigm shift for the field."

The researchers also raise a possible down side in using p38 MAPK inhibitors to treat inflammatory diseases such as Crohn's disease, psoriasis and asthma.

"These therapeutic approaches should … be evaluated within the context of our results, and in light of the possibility that inhibition of XBP1s activity also decreases the ability of the cell to cope with the inflammatory conditions," they write.

The study (doi:10.1038/nm.2449) was supported by the National Institutes of Health and the Timothy Murphy funds provided to the Division of Endocrinology, Children's Hospital Boston. Jaemin Lee, PhD, and Cheng Sun, PhD, were co-first authors on the paper.

Children's Hospital Boston is home to the world's largest research enterprise based at a pediatric medical center, where its discoveries have benefited both children and adults since 1869. More than 1,100 scientists, including nine members of the National Academy of Sciences, 11 members of the Institute of Medicine and nine members of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute comprise Children's research community. Children's also is the primary pediatric teaching affiliate of Harvard Medical School. For more information about research and clinical innovation at Children's, visit: http://vectorblog.org.

Original article: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2011-09/chb-ntf090211.php