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Welcome to The Visible Embryo, a comprehensive educational resource on human development from conception to birth.

The Visible Embryo provides visual references for changes in fetal development throughout pregnancy and can be navigated via fetal development or maternal changes.

The National Institutes of Child Health and Human Development awarded Phase I and Phase II Small Business Innovative Research Grants to develop The Visible Embryo. Initally designed to evaluate the internet as a teaching tool for first year medical students, The Visible Embryo is linked to over 600 educational institutions and is viewed by more than ' million visitors each month.


WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform
The World Health Organization (WHO) has created a new Web site to help researchers, doctors and patients obtain reliable information on high-quality clinical trials. Now you can go to one website and search all registers to identify clinical trial research underway around the world!



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Pregnancy Timeline by SemestersFemale Reproductive SystemFertilizationThe Appearance of SomitesFirst TrimesterSecond TrimesterThird TrimesterFetal liver is producing blood cellsHead may position into pelvisBrain convolutions beginFull TermWhite fat begins to be madeWhite fat begins to be madeHead may position into pelvisImmune system beginningImmune system beginningPeriod of rapid brain growthBrain convolutions beginLungs begin to produce surfactantSensory brain waves begin to activateSensory brain waves begin to activateInner Ear Bones HardenBone marrow starts making blood cellsBone marrow starts making blood cellsBrown fat surrounds lymphatic systemFetal sexual organs visibleFinger and toe prints appearFinger and toe prints appearHeartbeat can be detectedHeartbeat can be detectedBasic Brain Structure in PlaceThe Appearance of SomitesFirst Detectable Brain WavesA Four Chambered HeartBeginning Cerebral HemispheresEnd of Embryonic PeriodEnd of Embryonic PeriodFirst Thin Layer of Skin AppearsThird TrimesterDevelopmental Timeline
Click weeks 0 - 40 and follow fetal growth
Google Search artcles published since 2007
 
September 30, 2011--------News Archive

Estrodial A Unisex Hormone Essential To Metabolism
Possible treatment options could result for diabetes, obesity and heart disease.

Remove Fibroids - Prevent Recurrent Miscarriages
Research has found the first, firm evidence that fibroids are associated with recurrent miscarriages.

Understanding How Brain White Matter Develops
Study findings indicate a key step in the generation of white matter and understanding developmental disabilities.

'Alarm Clock' Gene Wakes-Up Biological Clock
Finding promises insight into sleeplessness, aging and chronic illness, such as diabetes and cancer.

September 29, 2011--------News Archive

Control Gene for Developmental Timing Discovered
Research has identified a key regulator controlling the speed of development in fruit flies. Blocking this regulator sped up the animals' rate of maturity.

Low Zinc/Copper Might Cause Spontaneous Abortion
This hypothesis had never been proven before in humans, and now has been demonstrated by University of Granada research.

Scientists Identify New Brain Stem Cell Activity
Finding raises questions of how the human brain develops and evolves.

Millesecond Memory
'Teleportation' of rats sheds light on how the memory is organized.

September 28, 2011--------News Archive

What Do Infants Remember, What Do They Forget?
In fact, they understand that objects once seen, should not disappear.

Found: New Gene Region for Testicle Development
Research has found a new genetic region which may control testicle development in the foetus.

September 27, 2011--------News Archive

Severe/Moderate Preemie Lung Function Improves
The negative effects of premature birth, whether moderately premature or extremely so, may be reversed by their teenage years.

Mom's Exercise Protects Baby From Alzheimer's
New research suggests prenatal exercise improves brain plasticity, decreases toxic protein deposits, inflammation and oxidative stress, warding off Alzheimer's.

Predicting the Best Treatment for Breast Cancer
Researchers identify new genes that help determine breast cancer prognosis.

September 26, 2011--------News Archive

Key Step Reprograms Adult Cells to Mimic Stem Cells
UNC researchers identify an important difference in sperm cell reprogramming needed to initiate formation of the embryo.

First USA Embryonic Stem Cell Therapy for Paralysis
The trial is being run by Geron Corp. of Menlo Park, Calif., which developed and manufactures the cells being tested.

UK Begins Stem Cell Trial for Disorder of the Retina
A new clinical trial using retinal cells derived from stem cells will treat people with an inherited eye condition which causes loss of sight in young people.

Pregnancy Occupation Can Cause Asthma in Child
Mothers who are exposed to particular agents during pregnancy could give birth to children with a higher risk of asthma, according to new research.

WHO Child Growth Charts

Hormone researcher at the University of Houston (UH) is set on providing long-term treatment options for diabetes, obesity and cardiovascular diseases by understanding estradiol, the most potent naturally occurring estrogen.

They now believe that this estrogen hormone is a prominent regulator of several body functions in both males and females.

While estradiol is commonly associated with processes and diseases specific to women, the team determined that the hormone actually functions as a unisex hormone with multiple actions. Research has indicated that when there is an excessive or insufficient amount of estradiol present, the metabolic network becomes imbalanced, which can result in metabolic diseases.

"Female hormones have always been associated with the menstrual cycle, pregnancy, breast-feeding and some diseases, such as osteoporosis and breast cancer, typically associated with women," said Dr. Rodrigo Barros, a research assistant professor with the UH Center for Nuclear Receptors and Cell Signaling (CNRCS).

"Our group, however, has discovered that one of these hormones, estradiol, has much wider actions than previously thought. It is no longer considered exclusively a 'female sex hormone,' but a 'unisex hormone' with multiple actions across several organ systems."

Working with CNRCS director and professor Dr. Jan-Åke Gustafsson, Barros says that part of their research is dedicated to understanding how estradiol regulates feeding and food metabolism, explaining that it is involved with metabolic diseases, including eating disorders, obesity and diabetes.

"We believe that all the systems in the body involved with food consumption and metabolism, which include the brain, liver, pancreas, heart, muscles and fat, are connected by estradiol, resulting in a 'metabolic network' regulated by the hormone," Barros said. "Our evidence shows that when too much or too little estradiol is available, this delicate network loses its balance and metabolic diseases set in."

The research has important implications for the average consumer, as well as for physicians.

While hormones like estradiol are important for the adequate maintenance of body functioning, they may pose serious risks to a person's health if misused as supplements. This comes into play when people use alternative forms of hormones, such as natural plant derivatives, that may be harmful if used inappropriately.

For specialists dealing with hormonal treatments, this research underscores that they should be aware that several organs and body functions are affected when estradiol is prescribed and may cause or worsen metabolic diseases.

Due to the number of organs and functions affected by fluctuating levels of estradiol, its use as a hormonal treatment for patients with delayed puberty, menopausal symptoms, osteoporosis and prostate cancer is a source of debate within the medical and research communities.

Exploring the impact of such treatments as reported by Barros and Gustafsson is helpful for keeping these professionals abreast of new research and guidelines.

The findings are described in an invited review titled "Estrogen Receptors and the Metabolic Network." The report appeared in the September issue of the research journal Cell Metabolism, a high-impact monthly research journal in the Cell Press publishing network that chronicles notable research on salient scientific discoveries.

Funded by the Robert A. Welch Foundation, the Emerging Technology Fund of Texas and the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas, the CNRCS team works in collaboration with Sweden's Karolinska Institutet.

About the University of Houston
The University of Houston is a Carnegie-designated Tier One public research university recognized by The Princeton Review as one of the nation's best colleges for undergraduate education. UH serves the globally competitive Houston and Gulf Coast Region by providing world-class faculty, experiential learning and strategic industry partnerships. Located in the nation's fourth-largest city, UH serves more than 38,500 students in the most ethnically and culturally diverse region in the country.

About the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics
The UH College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, with 181 ranked faculty and approximately 4,500 students, offers bachelor's, master's and doctoral degrees in the natural sciences, computational sciences and mathematics. Faculty members in the departments of biology and biochemistry, chemistry, computer science, earth and atmospheric sciences, mathematics and physics conduct internationally recognized research in collaboration with industry, Texas Medical Center institutions, NASA and others worldwide.

About the UH Center for Nuclear Receptors and Cell Signaling
Established in 2009, the University of Houston Center for Nuclear Receptors and Cell Signaling (CNRCS) is the centerpiece of the university's tier-one biomedical research initiative and member of the internationally renowned Texas Medical Center. Working from the center's state-of-the-art labs, CNRCS researchers combine interdisciplinary research with dynamic collaboration within the medical center and with industry partners, with the goal of finding new treatments for an array of significant diseases, including cancer, diabetes and metabolic syndrome.

Original article: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2011-09/uoh-ure092911.php