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Welcome to The Visible Embryo, a comprehensive educational resource on human development from conception to birth.

The Visible Embryo provides visual references for changes in fetal development throughout pregnancy and can be navigated via fetal development or maternal changes.

The National Institutes of Child Health and Human Development awarded Phase I and Phase II Small Business Innovative Research Grants to develop The Visible Embryo. Initally designed to evaluate the internet as a teaching tool for first year medical students, The Visible Embryo is linked to over 600 educational institutions and is viewed by more than ' million visitors each month.


WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform
The World Health Organization (WHO) has created a new Web site to help researchers, doctors and patients obtain reliable information on high-quality clinical trials. Now you can go to one website and search all registers to identify clinical trial research underway around the world!



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Disclaimer: The Visible Embryo web site is provided for your general information only. The information contained on this site should not be treated as a substitute for medical, legal or other professional advice. Neither is The Visible Embryo responsible or liable for the contents of any websites of third parties which are listed on this site.
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Pregnancy Timeline by SemestersFemale Reproductive SystemFertilizationThe Appearance of SomitesFirst TrimesterSecond TrimesterThird TrimesterFetal liver is producing blood cellsHead may position into pelvisBrain convolutions beginFull TermWhite fat begins to be madeWhite fat begins to be madeHead may position into pelvisImmune system beginningImmune system beginningPeriod of rapid brain growthBrain convolutions beginLungs begin to produce surfactantSensory brain waves begin to activateSensory brain waves begin to activateInner Ear Bones HardenBone marrow starts making blood cellsBone marrow starts making blood cellsBrown fat surrounds lymphatic systemFetal sexual organs visibleFinger and toe prints appearFinger and toe prints appearHeartbeat can be detectedHeartbeat can be detectedBasic Brain Structure in PlaceThe Appearance of SomitesFirst Detectable Brain WavesA Four Chambered HeartBeginning Cerebral HemispheresEnd of Embryonic PeriodEnd of Embryonic PeriodFirst Thin Layer of Skin AppearsThird TrimesterDevelopmental Timeline
Click weeks 0 - 40 and follow fetal growth
Google Search artcles published since 2007
 
November 11, 2011--------News Archive

Pre-birth Brain Growth Problems Linked to Autism
A small, preliminary study provides direct evidence for possible prenatal causes of autism.

Poor 1st, 3rd Trimester Sleep Linked to Early Births
Improving mother’s sleep habits through early intervention could reduce risk.

November 10, 2011--------News Archive

Possible New Target for Treating Kids' Liver Disease
An unexpected discovery in an often lethal pediatric liver disease may lead to a new therapy for the hard-to-treat condition.

Diagnoses of Autism Spectrum Disorders Vary Widely
Study suggests common diagnostic subcategories like asperger syndrome are flawed are of questionable value.

November 9, 2011--------News Archive

Single Protein Causes Varicose Veins
Scientists have developed a model for studying varicose veins. Their hope is that drugs can be developed to decelerate or even prevent new varicose veins.

"Switching On/Off" of Brain Genes Throughout Life
The “switching on” or expression of specific genes in the human makes each human being unique. The On/Off switching of brain cells continues throughout life.

Balancing Male and Female X Genes
Cells use 'mathematics' to equalize the loss of an X chromosome gene in males.

November 8, 2011--------News Archive

MRI Reveals Injuries in Developing Brain
New research supports the potential of high-field MRI for early identification of tiny brain injuries in the preterm infant.

Epigenetic Signatures of Autism
Analysis reveals overlap between genetic and epigenetic risk maps in autism.

November 7, 2011--------News Archive

"Cat Litter" Disease Alters Brain Chemistry
Infection by the brain parasite Toxoplasma gondii, directly affects the production of dopamine in the brain.

Two Molecules That Kill Lymphoma Cells In Mice
Two molecules have been identified that may be more effective as lymphoma cancer killers than anything currently available on the market.

Why Some Children Became Critically Ill in 2009 Flu
The largest study to date finds that kids co-infected with MRSA had an increased death risk of 8-fold. Flu vaccination is strongly urged!

WHO Child Growth Charts

Researchers at the University of Southern California have identified two molecules that may be more effective lymphoma cancer killers than are currently available on the market.

The peptides, molecules derived from a cancer-causing virus, target an enzyme in cancerous cells that regulates a widely researched tumor suppressor protein known as p53. They inhibit the enzyme, causing p53 levels in cancer cells to rise, which leads to cell death.

Lymphoma tumors in mice injected with the two peptides showed marked regression with no significant weight-loss or gross abnormalities to the mice.

The discovery is detailed in the journal Nature Structural & Molecular Biology, Nov. 6.

HAUSP, or herpesvirus-associated ubiquitin specific protease, is an enzyme that cleaves the normally occurring protein ubiquitin from substrates like p53. In a healthy environment, ubiquitin binds to a substrate, causing it to degrade and die.

"Given the mounting evidence that HAUSP serves as a pivotal component regulating p53 protein levels, the inhibition of HAUSP should have the benefit to fully activate p53," said Hye-Ra Lee, Ph.D., the study's first author and a research fellow in the Department of Molecular Microbiology & Immunology at the Keck School of Medicine of USC.

Using co-crystal structural analysis, Lee and her colleagues found a tight, "belt-type" interaction between HAUSP and a viral protein that causes Kaposi's sarcoma and lymphoma.

The peptides derived from this viral protein bind 200 times more strongly to HAUSP than p53, making them ideal HAUSP inhibitors. The researchers found that the peptides comprehensively prevented HAUSP from cleaving ubiquitin, allowing p53 levels to rise — thereby representing potential new chemotherapeutic molecules that can be used for anti-cancer therapies.

New research is under way with Nouri Neamati, Ph.D., associate professor of pharmacology and pharmaceutical sciences in the USC School of Pharmacy, to find small molecules that mimic the peptides. The peptides and other small molecules are being tested on different cancers.

"Significant advances in scientific understanding often come at the intersection of independent lines of research from different disciplines, for instance, structure and virus study. Time after time, viruses are teaching us," said Jae Jung, Ph.D., the study's principal investigator and chairman of the Department of Molecular Microbiology & Immunology at the Keck School of Medicine.

Authors of the study include researchers from the Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Korea Basic Science Institute, Korea University, University of Science and Technology (Korea), and Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München. Funding came from the National Institute of Health and National Research Foundation of Korea.

Original article: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2011-11/uosc-umi110311.php