Welcome to The Visible Embryo

Home- - -History-- -Bibliography- -Pregnancy Timeline- --Prescription Drugs in Pregnancy- -- Pregnancy Calculator- --Female Reproductive System- News Alerts -Contact

Welcome to The Visible Embryo, a comprehensive educational resource on human development from conception to birth.

The Visible Embryo provides visual references for changes in fetal development throughout pregnancy and can be navigated via fetal development or maternal changes.

The National Institutes of Child Health and Human Development awarded Phase I and Phase II Small Business Innovative Research Grants to develop The Visible Embryo. Initally designed to evaluate the internet as a teaching tool for first year medical students, The Visible Embryo is linked to over 600 educational institutions and is viewed by more than ' million visitors each month.


WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform
The World Health Organization (WHO) has created a new Web site to help researchers, doctors and patients obtain reliable information on high-quality clinical trials. Now you can go to one website and search all registers to identify clinical trial research underway around the world!



Home

History

Bibliography

Pregnancy Timeline

Prescription Drug Effects on Pregnancy

Pregnancy Calculator

Female Reproductive System

Contact The Visible Embryo

News Alerts Archive

Disclaimer: The Visible Embryo web site is provided for your general information only. The information contained on this site should not be treated as a substitute for medical, legal or other professional advice. Neither is The Visible Embryo responsible or liable for the contents of any websites of third parties which are listed on this site.
Content protected under a Creative Commons License.

No dirivative works may be made or used for commercial purposes.

Return To Top Of Page
Pregnancy Timeline by SemestersFemale Reproductive SystemFertilizationThe Appearance of SomitesFirst TrimesterSecond TrimesterThird TrimesterFetal liver is producing blood cellsHead may position into pelvisBrain convolutions beginFull TermWhite fat begins to be madeWhite fat begins to be madeHead may position into pelvisImmune system beginningImmune system beginningPeriod of rapid brain growthBrain convolutions beginLungs begin to produce surfactantSensory brain waves begin to activateSensory brain waves begin to activateInner Ear Bones HardenBone marrow starts making blood cellsBone marrow starts making blood cellsBrown fat surrounds lymphatic systemFetal sexual organs visibleFinger and toe prints appearFinger and toe prints appearHeartbeat can be detectedHeartbeat can be detectedBasic Brain Structure in PlaceThe Appearance of SomitesFirst Detectable Brain WavesA Four Chambered HeartBeginning Cerebral HemispheresEnd of Embryonic PeriodEnd of Embryonic PeriodFirst Thin Layer of Skin AppearsThird TrimesterDevelopmental Timeline
Click weeks 0 - 40 and follow fetal growth
Google Search artcles published since 2007
 
November 11, 2011--------News Archive

Pre-birth Brain Growth Problems Linked to Autism
A small, preliminary study provides direct evidence for possible prenatal causes of autism.

Poor 1st, 3rd Trimester Sleep Linked to Early Births
Improving mother’s sleep habits through early intervention could reduce risk.

November 10, 2011--------News Archive

Possible New Target for Treating Kids' Liver Disease
An unexpected discovery in an often lethal pediatric liver disease may lead to a new therapy for the hard-to-treat condition.

Diagnoses of Autism Spectrum Disorders Vary Widely
Study suggests common diagnostic subcategories like asperger syndrome are flawed are of questionable value.

November 9, 2011--------News Archive

Single Protein Causes Varicose Veins
Scientists have developed a model for studying varicose veins. Their hope is that drugs can be developed to decelerate or even prevent new varicose veins.

"Switching On/Off" of Brain Genes Throughout Life
The “switching on” or expression of specific genes in the human makes each human being unique. The On/Off switching of brain cells continues throughout life.

Balancing Male and Female X Genes
Cells use 'mathematics' to equalize the loss of an X chromosome gene in males.

November 8, 2011--------News Archive

MRI Reveals Injuries in Developing Brain
New research supports the potential of high-field MRI for early identification of tiny brain injuries in the preterm infant.

Epigenetic Signatures of Autism
Analysis reveals overlap between genetic and epigenetic risk maps in autism.

November 7, 2011--------News Archive

"Cat Litter" Disease Alters Brain Chemistry
Infection by the brain parasite Toxoplasma gondii, directly affects the production of dopamine in the brain.

Two Molecules That Kill Lymphoma Cells In Mice
Two molecules have been identified that may be more effective as lymphoma cancer killers than anything currently available on the market.

Why Some Children Became Critically Ill in 2009 Flu
The largest study to date finds that kids co-infected with MRSA had an increased death risk of 8-fold. Flu vaccination is strongly urged!

WHO Child Growth Charts

Varicose veins, sometimes referred to as "varices" in medical jargon, are usually just a cosmetic problem if they occur as spider veins.

But in an advanced stage, they pose a real health threat. In people with a widespread disorder, the blood is no longer transported to the heart unhindered but instead pools in the veins of the leg. This is because the vessel walls or venous valves no longer function properly.

Dr. Thomas Korff and his group at the Division of Cardiovascular Physiology (Director: Prof. Markus Hecker) of Heidelberg University's Institute of Physiology and Pathophysiology have now shown that the processes causing varicose veins are mediated by a single protein.

As a response to increased stretching of the vessel wall, this protein triggers the production of several molecules promoting changes in wall architecture. The paper published in the current issue of FASEB Journal may offer a possibility for creating drugs to decelerate varicose vein formation or even prevent new varicose veins from forming.

Previously no suitable experimental system existed for studying the way in which changes in the cells of the blood vessels are controlled. So Korff and his team took advantage of the fact that blood vessels in the mouse ear are clearly visible, as well as easily accessible, and began using the mouse for minor surgical procedures.

In order to artificially set off processes similar to the formation of varicose veins, they tied off a mouse ear vein with a thin thread. The elevated pressure in the vessels caused by the pooled blood led to the recognizable characteristic of varicose veins.

In addition, in the affected veins, the cells proliferated and the production of an enzyme - MMP-2 - increased. MMP-2 breaks down parts of the connective tissue of blood vessels. On the other hand, there were no signs of an inflammatory response, which is often seen in other vessel remodeling processes.

"Nevertheless, the cellular mechanisms that control the formation of varicose veins appear to be similar to mechanisms that orchestrate the remodeling of arteries in patients with high blood pressure," Korff explains.

Transcription factor AP-1 regulates the activity of certain genes and is regulated by the filling pressure in the blood vessels. It in turn effectively controls the formation of varicose veins, Korff adds.

If AP-1 is inhibited, the characteristic corkscrew-like varicose veins do not form and cell proliferation and the production of enzymes that break down connective tissue remain at normal levels.

In another experiment, the group showed that the results obtained in the mouse are also valid for humans. Varicose veins that have been surgically removed from patients exhibited the same cell and molecular changes as the varicose veins created artificially in the mouse ear.

Based on these results, Korff plans more studies.

"Using our model, we can now more precisely analyze the early stages of the disorder and test possible drugs for their ability to prevent varicose vein formation, which, as a result, may improve the quality of life of afflicted patients."

According to the German Vascular League, 30 million people suffer from minor vein-related symptoms, and women are affected around twice as often as men. According to a health report published by the German government, 15 to 20 percent of the population has varicose veins.

Literature: Feldner A, Otto H, Rewerk S, Hecker M, Korff T. Experimental hypertension triggers varicosis-like maladaptive venous remodeling through activator protein-1. FASEB J. 2011 Oct;25(10):3613-21. Epub 2011 Jun 17.

Heidelberg University Hospital and Medical Faculty of Heidelberg University Patient Care, Research and Teaching of International Standing.Heidelberg University Hospital is among the largest and most renowned medical centers in Germany. The Medical Faculty of Heidelberg University ranges among the internationally relevant biomedical research institutes in Europe.

Original article: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2011-11/uomm-uri110711.php