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Welcome to The Visible Embryo, a comprehensive educational resource on human development from conception to birth.

The Visible Embryo provides visual references for changes in fetal development throughout pregnancy and can be navigated via fetal development or maternal changes.

The National Institutes of Child Health and Human Development awarded Phase I and Phase II Small Business Innovative Research Grants to develop The Visible Embryo. Initally designed to evaluate the internet as a teaching tool for first year medical students, The Visible Embryo is linked to over 600 educational institutions and is viewed by more than ' million visitors each month.


WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform
The World Health Organization (WHO) has created a new Web site to help researchers, doctors and patients obtain reliable information on high-quality clinical trials. Now you can go to one website and search all registers to identify clinical trial research underway around the world!



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Pregnancy Timeline by SemestersFetal liver is producing blood cellsHead may position into pelvisBrain convolutions beginFull TermWhite fat begins to be madeWhite fat begins to be madeHead may position into pelvisImmune system beginningImmune system beginningPeriod of rapid brain growthBrain convolutions beginLungs begin to produce surfactantSensory brain waves begin to activateSensory brain waves begin to activateInner Ear Bones HardenBone marrow starts making blood cellsBone marrow starts making blood cellsBrown fat surrounds lymphatic systemFetal sexual organs visibleFinger and toe prints appearFinger and toe prints appearHeartbeat can be detectedHeartbeat can be detectedBasic Brain Structure in PlaceThe Appearance of SomitesFirst Detectable Brain WavesA Four Chambered HeartBeginning Cerebral HemispheresFemale Reproductive SystemEnd of Embryonic PeriodEnd of Embryonic PeriodFirst Thin Layer of Skin AppearsThird TrimesterSecond TrimesterFirst TrimesterFertilizationDevelopmental Timeline
Click weeks 0 - 40 and follow fetal growth
Google Search artcles published since 2007
 
May 6, 2011--------News Archive

Winter Conceptions at Greater Risk Of Autism
More than 7 million children born in California in the 1990s and early 2000s showed a clear link between their month of conception and their risk of a diagnosis of autism.

Manhood Is a 'Precarious' State
Difficult to earn and easy to lose,"manhood" is a fragile state of mind dependent on NO role violations.


May 5, 2011--------News Archive

Autism Enlarges Brain Before Age 2
Research from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill notes that 2-year-old autistic children's brains are up to 10 percent larger than non-autistic children.

Autism: Broken Neurons or Just Slowly Developing?
Developmental abnormalities in the mirror neuron system may in individuals with autism is not actually broken, but simply delayed.


May 4, 2011--------News Archive

New Mothers Learn A Lot From Their Babies
The best teacher for a young mother is her baby, say experts who train social workers to interact with first-time moms.

H1N1, Pregnant Women Were Right To Worry
Women with H1N1 gave birth to lower birth weight babies compared to those who had “influenza-like illness.”


May 3, 2011--------News Archive

Early Nutrition Has A Long-Term Metabolic Impact
Growth, hormonal profiles differ between breastfed and formula-fed infants.

Grandma Was Right: Infants Do Wake Up Taller
Science is finally confirming what grandma knew all along: infants wake up taller right after they sleep.


May 2, 2011--------News Archive

Maternal Obesity Puts Infants At Risk
Carrying too much weight during pregnancy could affect newborns' iron status and brain development.

Errors Put Infants, Children At Risk For Overdose
Prescriptions for narcotics often contain too much medication per dose.

WHO Child Growth Charts

Carrying too much weight during pregnancy could affect newborns' iron status and brain development.
Babies born to obese mothers are at risk for iron deficiency, which could affect infant brain development, according to a study to be presented Saturday, April 30, at the Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) annual meeting in Denver.

In nonpregnant adults, obesity-related inflammation hinders the transport of iron through the intestine, increasing the risk of iron deficiency anemia.

When a woman is pregnant, iron is transferred through the intestine to the placenta, but it is not known how maternal obesity affects newborn iron status. Fetal iron status is important because 50 percent of the iron needed for infant growth is obtained before birth.

In this study, researchers studied 281 mother/newborn pairs. The women's body mass index was calculated before delivery, and a score of 30 or above was defined as obese. Investigators also determined infants' iron level by analyzing umbilical cord blood.

Results showed evidence of impaired iron status in newborns of women who were obese.

"These findings are important because iron deficiency in infancy is associated with impaired brain development, and we should understand all risk factors for iron deficiency in infancy," said Pamela J. Kling, MD, FAAP, principal investigator and associate professor of pediatrics/neonatology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

The researchers are investigating why obesity during pregnancy is a risk factor for poorer iron status at birth, Dr. Kling said.

"In nonpregnant adults, obesity has been linked to poorer dietary iron absorption and to diabetes, so both factors may contribute," she said. "Additionally, the link may be due to larger fetuses, because obesity during pregnancy results in larger fetuses, and iron needs are proportional to fetal size."

The study results also have important implications because the prevalence of obesity in women of childbearing age is increasing.

Abstract: http://www.abstracts2view.com/pas/view.php?nu=PAS11L1_535.

The Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) are four individual pediatric organizations who co-sponsor the PAS Annual Meeting – the American Pediatric Society, the Society for Pediatric Research, the Academic Pediatric Association, and the American Academy of Pediatrics. Members of these organizations are pediatricians and other health care providers who are practicing in the research, academic and clinical arenas. The four sponsoring organizations are leaders in the advancement of pediatric research and child advocacy within pediatrics, and all share a common mission of fostering the health and well being of children worldwide. For more information, visit www.pas-meeting.org. Follow news of the PAS meeting on Twitter at http://twitter.com/PedAcadSoc.