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Welcome to The Visible Embryo, a comprehensive educational resource on human development from conception to birth.

The Visible Embryo provides visual references for changes in fetal development throughout pregnancy and can be navigated via fetal development or maternal changes.

The National Institutes of Child Health and Human Development awarded Phase I and Phase II Small Business Innovative Research Grants to develop The Visible Embryo. Initally designed to evaluate the internet as a teaching tool for first year medical students, The Visible Embryo is linked to over 600 educational institutions and is viewed by more than ' million visitors each month.


WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform
The World Health Organization (WHO) has created a new Web site to help researchers, doctors and patients obtain reliable information on high-quality clinical trials. Now you can go to one website and search all registers to identify clinical trial research underway around the world!



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Pregnancy Timeline by SemestersFemale Reproductive SystemFertilizationThe Appearance of SomitesFirst TrimesterSecond TrimesterThird TrimesterFetal liver is producing blood cellsHead may position into pelvisBrain convolutions beginFull TermWhite fat begins to be madeWhite fat begins to be madeHead may position into pelvisImmune system beginningImmune system beginningPeriod of rapid brain growthBrain convolutions beginLungs begin to produce surfactantSensory brain waves begin to activateSensory brain waves begin to activateInner Ear Bones HardenBone marrow starts making blood cellsBone marrow starts making blood cellsBrown fat surrounds lymphatic systemFetal sexual organs visibleFinger and toe prints appearFinger and toe prints appearHeartbeat can be detectedHeartbeat can be detectedBasic Brain Structure in PlaceThe Appearance of SomitesFirst Detectable Brain WavesA Four Chambered HeartBeginning Cerebral HemispheresEnd of Embryonic PeriodEnd of Embryonic PeriodFirst Thin Layer of Skin AppearsThird TrimesterDevelopmental Timeline
Click weeks 0 - 40 and follow fetal growth
Google Search artcles published since 2007
 
December 9, 2011--------News Archive

Steroid Increases Life Expectancy for Preemies
Giving antenatal corticosteroids to moms expecting preterm infants - between 22 and 25 weeks gestation - reduces infant death and long-term impairment.

A New Understanding of How Our Lungs Grow
New research challenges the medical textbooks and declares that the tiny airsacs continue to increase in number as we grow to adulthood.

Early Pregnancy Stress, Pre-Term Birth, Fewer Boys
Stress in the second and third months of pregnancy can shorten pregnancies, increase the risk of pre-term births and lead to a decline in male babies.

December 8, 2011--------News Archive

Mother's Touch Protects Child Against Drug Cravings
Attentive, nurturing mothering may help her children better resist the temptations of drug use later in life.

Flu Vaccine Protects Pregnant Mom and New-Borns
The influenza shot boosts the immune response in pregnant women and protects neuronatal babies via antibodies transferred through the placenta.

Tadpoles Made to Grow Eyes on Back and Tail
Changing the voltage in embryonic frog cell of tadpole's back causes cell to develop into a functioning eye.

December 7, 2011--------News Archive

Baby See, Baby Do?
Study shows infants take cues from trusted sources only, and ignore unreliable faces.

Bitter Taste of Broccoli Not Just About Flavor
Broccoli’s taste is not just a matter of having a cultured palate; some people actually taste a bitter compound in the vegetable that others cannot.

Game Players Advance Genetic Research
Users of the game Phylo, designed by McGill University researchers, are contributing to analysis of DNA sequences in Alzheimer’s, diabetes and cancer.

December 6, 2011--------News Archive

One Quarter of Families Begin Before 24 Years Old
National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, looked at the different paths to family formation. Results looks at the experiences of young adults through age 25.

Orphans Undergo Biological Change to Their Genome
Changes can be seen in the genetic regulation of the immune system, including a number of important mechanisms in the development and function of the brain.

Child Abuse Changes the Brain
Brain imaging reveals the same pattern of brain activity in these children as seen in soldiers in war.

December 5, 2011--------News Archive

Defect in Brain May Cause Autism-Like Syndrome
Autism in Timothy Syndrome has been found to produce fewer cells connecting both halves of the brain, and overproduce dopamine and norepinephrine.

Flipping Off the Switch that Causes Aging
For the first time, Harvard scientists have partially reversed age-related degeneration in mice, resulting in new growth of the brain and testes, improved fertility, and the return of lost cognitive function.

Mapping the Neurons Created in Youth
Harvard study of brain development may shed light on brain disorders such as autism and schizophrenia.

WHO Child Growth Charts


A child in a Russian orphanage. Photo by Hanne Johnsen

By Karen N. Peart

Children who experience the stress of separation at birth from biological parents and are brought up in orphanages undergo biological consequences such as changes in their genome functioning, Yale School of Medicine researchers report in a new study.

Published online in the current issue of Development and Psychopathology, the study reports differences in DNA methylation, one of the main regulatory mechanisms of gene expression, or genome functioning. The investigators compared two cohorts: 14 children raised since birth in institutional care and 14 children raised by their biological parents.

Senior author Elena Grigorenko, associate professor at the Yale Child Study Center, and her colleagues took blood samples from children aged 7 to 10 living in orphanages and children growing up in typical families in the northwest region of the Russian Federation. They then profiled the genomes of all the children to identify which biological processes and pathways might be affected by deprivation of parental attention and care.

The team found that in the institutionalized group, there was a greater number of changes in the genetic regulation of the systems controlling immune response and inter-cellular interactions, including a number of important mechanisms in the development and function of the brain.

“Our study shows that the early stress of separation from a biological parent impacts long-term programming of genome function; this might explain why adopted children may be particularly vulnerable to harsh parenting in terms of their physical and mental health,” said Grigorenko. “Parenting adopted children might require much more nurturing care to reverse these changes in genome regulation.”

Other authors on the study included Oksana Naumova, Maria Lee, Roman Koposov, Moshe Szyf, and Mary Dozier.

The study was funded by the Foundation for Child Development, the USA National Institute of Mental Health, and Edna Bennett Pierce.

Citation: Development and Psychopathology: doi:10.1017/S0954579411000605

Original article: http://news.yale.edu/2011/12/05/orphaned-children-exhibit-genetic-changes-require-nurturing-parents