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Welcome to The Visible Embryo, a comprehensive educational resource on human development from conception to birth.

The Visible Embryo provides visual references for changes in fetal development throughout pregnancy and can be navigated via fetal development or maternal changes.

The National Institutes of Child Health and Human Development awarded Phase I and Phase II Small Business Innovative Research Grants to develop The Visible Embryo. Initally designed to evaluate the internet as a teaching tool for first year medical students, The Visible Embryo is linked to over 600 educational institutions and is viewed by more than ' million visitors each month.


WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform
The World Health Organization (WHO) has created a new Web site to help researchers, doctors and patients obtain reliable information on high-quality clinical trials. Now you can go to one website and search all registers to identify clinical trial research underway around the world!



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Pregnancy Timeline by SemestersFemale Reproductive SystemFertilizationThe Appearance of SomitesFirst TrimesterSecond TrimesterThird TrimesterFetal liver is producing blood cellsHead may position into pelvisBrain convolutions beginFull TermWhite fat begins to be madeWhite fat begins to be madeHead may position into pelvisImmune system beginningImmune system beginningPeriod of rapid brain growthBrain convolutions beginLungs begin to produce surfactantSensory brain waves begin to activateSensory brain waves begin to activateInner Ear Bones HardenBone marrow starts making blood cellsBone marrow starts making blood cellsBrown fat surrounds lymphatic systemFetal sexual organs visibleFinger and toe prints appearFinger and toe prints appearHeartbeat can be detectedHeartbeat can be detectedBasic Brain Structure in PlaceThe Appearance of SomitesFirst Detectable Brain WavesA Four Chambered HeartBeginning Cerebral HemispheresEnd of Embryonic PeriodEnd of Embryonic PeriodFirst Thin Layer of Skin AppearsThird TrimesterDevelopmental Timeline
Click weeks 0 - 40 and follow fetal growth
Google Search artcles published since 2007
 
December 9, 2011--------News Archive

Steroid Increases Life Expectancy for Preemies
Giving antenatal corticosteroids to moms expecting preterm infants - between 22 and 25 weeks gestation - reduces infant death and long-term impairment.

A New Understanding of How Our Lungs Grow
New research challenges the medical textbooks and declares that the tiny airsacs continue to increase in number as we grow to adulthood.

Early Pregnancy Stress, Pre-Term Birth, Fewer Boys
Stress in the second and third months of pregnancy can shorten pregnancies, increase the risk of pre-term births and lead to a decline in male babies.

December 8, 2011--------News Archive

Mother's Touch Protects Child Against Drug Cravings
Attentive, nurturing mothering may help her children better resist the temptations of drug use later in life.

Flu Vaccine Protects Pregnant Mom and New-Borns
The influenza shot boosts the immune response in pregnant women and protects neuronatal babies via antibodies transferred through the placenta.

Tadpoles Made to Grow Eyes on Back and Tail
Changing the voltage in embryonic frog cell of tadpole's back causes cell to develop into a functioning eye.

December 7, 2011--------News Archive

Baby See, Baby Do?
Study shows infants take cues from trusted sources only, and ignore unreliable faces.

Bitter Taste of Broccoli Not Just About Flavor
Broccoli’s taste is not just a matter of having a cultured palate; some people actually taste a bitter compound in the vegetable that others cannot.

Game Players Advance Genetic Research
Users of the game Phylo, designed by McGill University researchers, are contributing to analysis of DNA sequences in Alzheimer’s, diabetes and cancer.

December 6, 2011--------News Archive

One Quarter of Families Begin Before 24 Years Old
National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, looked at the different paths to family formation. Results looks at the experiences of young adults through age 25.

Orphans Undergo Biological Change to Their Genome
Changes can be seen in the genetic regulation of the immune system, including a number of important mechanisms in the development and function of the brain.

Child Abuse Changes the Brain
Brain imaging reveals the same pattern of brain activity in these children as seen in soldiers in war.

December 5, 2011--------News Archive

Defect in Brain May Cause Autism-Like Syndrome
Autism in Timothy Syndrome has been found to produce fewer cells connecting both halves of the brain, and overproduce dopamine and norepinephrine.

Flipping Off the Switch that Causes Aging
For the first time, Harvard scientists have partially reversed age-related degeneration in mice, resulting in new growth of the brain and testes, improved fertility, and the return of lost cognitive function.

Mapping the Neurons Created in Youth
Harvard study of brain development may shed light on brain disorders such as autism and schizophrenia.

WHO Child Growth Charts


en.wikipedia.org/ wiki/Vaccine


The H1N1 flu vaccine protects both pregnant women and newly-borns

The researchers studied the immune response of 107 pregnant women after they were injected with a single dose of non-adjuvant H1N1 vaccine. They concluded that the influenza shot boosted the immune response in pregnant women and at the same time protected neuronatal babies via the antibodies that transferred through the placenta.

These results were published in the review Annals of Internal Medicine dated December 6th, 2011.

Influenza (the flu) is a contagious, acute respiratory infection caused by the family of viruses Influenzae. There are three types of Influenza virus: A, B and C. The A and B viruses cause seasonal (or winter) epidemics, but only the A virus is responsible for worldwide epidemics. Very soon into the worldwide influenza epidemic of 2009, pregnant women and neonatal babies were found to be at very high risk of complications and death if infected, as had already been observed during previous worldwide influenza epidemics. As early as August 2009, a study published in The Lancet showed that 10% of the serious cases were observed in pregnant women, whereas they represented only 1% of the total French population. So H1N1 influenza vaccination of pregnant women was recommended as a priority.

The team led by Odile Launey, the Director of vaccinology at the Centre for Clinical Investigation at Cochin Pasteur (Inserm/AP-HP/Institut Pasteur/Université Paris Descartes), carried out a vaccination study in order to demonstrate the immunogenicity, in other words the immune response in terms of the production of antibodies, after a single injection of a nonadjuvant A strain (H1N1) into women at 21 days and 42 days of gestation and to measure the transplacentary transfer of the mother's antibodies to neonatal babies.

This study concerned 107 women between 22 and 32 weeks of amenorrhea who were monitored in 5 French neonatal clinics between November 3rd and December 4th 2009 after being injected into the arm with an injection of H1N1 A strain vaccine.

Blood tests were carried out in order to measure the antibody counts protecting against the influenza virus:

Piror to vaccination
3 and 6 weeks after vaccination
At delivery
3 months after delivery

On delivery, a blood sample is taken from the umbilical cord in order to measure the quantity of influenza antibodies transmitted to the newly born. All events observed in mothers and babies during the study were recorded.

Prior to vaccination, 19% of the patients already presented H1N1 strain antibodies at levels considered to be protective. Three and six weeks after vaccination, 98% of the patients presented blood antibody counts considered to be protective. On delivery and 3 weeks after delivery, the proportion of patients with antibody counts considered to be protective were between 92% and 90%. The umbilical cord samples of newly born babies showed antibody counts considered to be protective in 95% of cases, some antibody concentrations were even higher than in the mothers (a ratio of 1.4 between neonatal babies concentrations and maternal concentrations at delivery).

"These results show that the influenza vaccine boosts the immune system in pregnant women and also protects newly-borns via transplacenta transfer ," concludes Odile Launay.

This study and an increasing number of other studies on pregnant women have confirmed the non-toxicity of the influenza vaccine during pregnancy. This year again, pregnant women are strongly recommended to take the influenza vaccine. The composition of the vaccine is modified each year to cover the major strains of the previous winter, which are the strains most likely to be present the next winter.

"The H1N1 2009 virus is still around. That's why the inactivated H1N1 virus is still present in the current seasonal influenza vaccine." So it is highly recommended to vaccinate pregnant women in order to protect them and their baby, because otherwise the vaccine cannot be administered to babies before the age of 6 months", explains Odile Launay.

The influenza vaccination campaign in Metropolitan France will run from September 29th 2011 to January 31st 2012. This year again, the public health authorities (HCSP) recommend vaccinating pregnant women from day 21 of pregnancy and also persons suffering from obesity (who have a body mass index of 30 or more)*. The Health Service covers 100% of the cost for all high-risk persons, including pregnant women from day 21 of their pregnancy.

*(Decision by the public health authorities on July 13th 2011 during talks on setting up the 2011-2012 influenza vaccination campaign - July 31st, 2011)

Maternal Immune Response and Neonatal Seroprotection to a Single Dose of a Monovalent Non adjuvanted 2009 Influenza A(H1N1) Vaccine A Single-Group Trial. VassilisTsatsaris, MD, PhD; Catherine Capitant, MD; Thomas Schmitz, MD; CorineChazallon, MSc; Sophie Bulifon, MD; Didier Riethmuller, MD, PhD; Olivier Picone, MD; Patrice Poulain, MD, PhD; Fanny Lewin, MD; FabriceLaine´ , MD; EvelyneJacqz-Aigrain, MD, PhD; Jean-Pierre Aboulker, MD; and OdileLaunay, MD, PhD for the Inserm C09-33 PREFLUVAC (Immunogenicity and Safety of an Inactivated NonadjuvantedA[H1N1v] Influenza Vaccine in Pregnant Women) Study Group*

Annals of Internal Medicine, 6 décembre 2011 http://www.annals.org/content/155/11/733.abstract

Original article: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2011-12/ind-thf120711.php