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Welcome to The Visible Embryo, a comprehensive educational resource on human development from conception to birth.

The Visible Embryo provides visual references for changes in fetal development throughout pregnancy and can be navigated via fetal development or maternal changes.

The National Institutes of Child Health and Human Development awarded Phase I and Phase II Small Business Innovative Research Grants to develop The Visible Embryo. Initally designed to evaluate the internet as a teaching tool for first year medical students, The Visible Embryo is linked to over 600 educational institutions and is viewed by more than ' million visitors each month.


WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform
The World Health Organization (WHO) has created a new Web site to help researchers, doctors and patients obtain reliable information on high-quality clinical trials. Now you can go to one website and search all registers to identify clinical trial research underway around the world!



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Disclaimer: The Visible Embryo web site is provided for your general information only. The information contained on this site should not be treated as a substitute for medical, legal or other professional advice. Neither is The Visible Embryo responsible or liable for the contents of any websites of third parties which are listed on this site.
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Pregnancy Timeline by SemestersFemale Reproductive SystemFertilizationThe Appearance of SomitesFirst TrimesterSecond TrimesterThird TrimesterFetal liver is producing blood cellsHead may position into pelvisBrain convolutions beginFull TermWhite fat begins to be madeWhite fat begins to be madeHead may position into pelvisImmune system beginningImmune system beginningPeriod of rapid brain growthBrain convolutions beginLungs begin to produce surfactantSensory brain waves begin to activateSensory brain waves begin to activateInner Ear Bones HardenBone marrow starts making blood cellsBone marrow starts making blood cellsBrown fat surrounds lymphatic systemFetal sexual organs visibleFinger and toe prints appearFinger and toe prints appearHeartbeat can be detectedHeartbeat can be detectedBasic Brain Structure in PlaceThe Appearance of SomitesFirst Detectable Brain WavesA Four Chambered HeartBeginning Cerebral HemispheresEnd of Embryonic PeriodEnd of Embryonic PeriodFirst Thin Layer of Skin AppearsThird TrimesterDevelopmental Timeline
Click weeks 0 - 40 and follow fetal growth
Google Search artcles published since 2007
 
December 23, 2011--------News Archive

Defending the Genome
New research illustrates how the genome adapts to a transposon invasion that threatens fertility in the fruit fly. The same mechanism may exist in humans.

Multiple Sclerosis Not an Immune System Disease
Recent research argues that multiple sclerosis, long viewed as primarily an autoimmune disease, is more similar to hardening of the arteries.

Toddlers Rely On Others To Monitor Their Speech
When grown-ups and kids speak, they listen to the sound of their voice and make corrections based on that auditory feedback - something toddlers can't do.

December 22, 2011--------News Archive

How Pregnancy Changes a Woman’s Brain
At no other time in a woman’s life does she experience such massive hormonal fluctuations as during pregnancy.

New Device To Support Improved Newborn Health
Fetal heart rate monitor also tracks how well an infant is using oxygen.

Weight Reduction Through Mindful Eating
Pregnancy is a time when heavy women tend to gain an excessive amount of weight and later find it very hard to lose.

December 21, 2011--------News Archive

Breast Cancer, Heart Disease Share Common Roots
Women who are at risk for breast cancer may also be at greater risk for heart disease.

Breastfeeding Promotes Healthy Growth
Breastfeeding lowers the growth hormones IGF-I and insulin, promoting slightly slower growth and reducing adult risk of overweight and diabetes.

First Months of Life Shape Flavor Preferences
Early dietary experience shapes salt preference of infants and preschoolers.

December 20, 2011--------News Archive

Babies Remember Even As They Seem to Forget
How much do babies remember about the world around them, and what details do their brains need to absorb to help them keep track of things and people?

Safer Treatment for Asthma, Allergies, Arthritis?
Found, a missing link between our biological clock and sugar metabolism which may avoid serious side effects of drugs used for asthma, allergies and arthritis.

Endometriosis Link to Inflammatory Bowel Disease
Increased risk of inflammatory bowel disease is found in women with endometriosis in a nationwide Danish study.

December 19, 2011--------News Archive

Gene Discovered that Causes Rare Infant Epilepsy
The childhood disorder PKD is linked to a mysterious gene found in the brain called PRRT2 - a gene with little resemblance to anything in the human genome.

Don't Buy Noisy Toys!
If listened to at arms length, some popular items can permanently damage children's hearing - and hearing loss is not curable.

Childhood Cancer Drugs Cure, Later Cause Problems
Study indicates that drug toxicity may be related to genetic factors increasing risk of cardiomyopathy significantly in individuals with two copies of specific gene.

WHO Child Growth Charts

BMI For Adults Widget


       



Despite the numerous medical advances that happen every day, the infant mortality rate in the United States is still higher than most European countries.

While experts believe this is closely linked to the growing rate of pre-term births, researchers are committed to finding ways to make labor and delivery safer. Northwestern Medicine® researchers are examining a new device that may support improved newborn health at delivery through closer monitoring of infant oxygen use during labor.

"Poor birth outcomes are often directly related to loss of oxygen during labor and delivery," explained Alan Peaceman, MD, chief of maternal fetal medicine at Northwestern Memorial Hospital and professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine who is the lead investigator on the study.

"Through more advanced monitoring, we hope to identify red flags sooner and prevent dips in oxygen that may lead to long-term health issues for the baby."

STAN™ is fetal heart rate monitoring system that measures and tracks the electrical activity of the baby's heart via an internal electrode, along with uterine contractions and how well the baby uses oxygen during labor. It then interprets the data and signals clinicians when a significant change in oxygen levels or heart rate occurs. The monitor is approved by the Food and Drug Administration and is routinely used in Europe, but has not been widely adopted in the United States yet.

At present, it is only available for patients enrolled in the study. If this study demonstrates improved outcomes, it is likely that the monitoring system will become more widely available to mothers giving birth in this country.

"Current monitors measure heart rate alone, relying on the experience and judgment of the clinical team to interpret changes in data," said Peaceman. "This system captures additional measurements and interprets that data, which may eliminate the guesswork and offer a more accurate assessment of how well the baby is using oxygen."

Northwestern is one of 14 centers in the United States participating in the clinical trial, which researchers hope will enroll 11,000 women from across the country over the next three years. Subjects who opt to participate in this research study are randomly assigned to one of two groups. One will receive the standard fetal monitoring offered today, and the other will be monitored using the new system in addition to the existing method. The way in which fetal heart rate is monitored will be the only change to the labor and delivery experience, which will continue to be managed by the woman's doctor.

Peaceman is an active researcher who has led several studies that have changed the standard of obstetrical care. In 2008, results from the BEAM trial found that administering magnesium sulfate to women delivering before 32 weeks of gestation reduced the risk of cerebral palsy by 50 percent. Peaceman was also involved in studies that found the hormone hydroxyprogesterone to be effective in reducing the risk of delivery at less than 37 weeks gestation among women who had previously had a preterm birth.

"It is our duty to continually find ways to make childbirth safer," said Peaceman. "Research is an important way to evaluate current protocols and learn from birth statistics so we can improve newborn health."

For more information about the STAN clinical trial or to enroll, call 312-926-2475. For more information about Maternal Fetal Medicine at Northwestern Memorial or to make an appointment, call 312-926-0779 or visit us online.

About Northwestern Memorial HealthCare
Northwestern Memorial HealthCare is the parent corporation of Chicago's Northwestern Memorial Hospital, an 894-bed academic medical center hospital and Northwestern Lake Forest Hospital, a 205-bed community hospital located in Lake Forest, Illinois.

Original article: http://www.nmh.org/nm/STAN-fetal-monitor