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Welcome to The Visible Embryo, a comprehensive educational resource on human development from conception to birth.

The Visible Embryo provides visual references for changes in fetal development throughout pregnancy and can be navigated via fetal development or maternal changes.

The National Institutes of Child Health and Human Development awarded Phase I and Phase II Small Business Innovative Research Grants to develop The Visible Embryo. Initally designed to evaluate the internet as a teaching tool for first year medical students, The Visible Embryo is linked to over 600 educational institutions and is viewed by more than ' million visitors each month.


WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform
The World Health Organization (WHO) has created a new Web site to help researchers, doctors and patients obtain reliable information on high-quality clinical trials. Now you can go to one website and search all registers to identify clinical trial research underway around the world!



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Disclaimer: The Visible Embryo web site is provided for your general information only. The information contained on this site should not be treated as a substitute for medical, legal or other professional advice. Neither is The Visible Embryo responsible or liable for the contents of any websites of third parties which are listed on this site.
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Pregnancy Timeline by SemestersFetal liver is producing blood cellsHead may position into pelvisBrain convolutions beginFull TermWhite fat begins to be madeWhite fat begins to be madeHead may position into pelvisImmune system beginningImmune system beginningPeriod of rapid brain growthBrain convolutions beginLungs begin to produce surfactantSensory brain waves begin to activateSensory brain waves begin to activateInner Ear Bones HardenBone marrow starts making blood cellsBone marrow starts making blood cellsBrown fat surrounds lymphatic systemFetal sexual organs visibleFinger and toe prints appearFinger and toe prints appearHeartbeat can be detectedHeartbeat can be detectedBasic Brain Structure in PlaceThe Appearance of SomitesFirst Detectable Brain WavesA Four Chambered HeartBeginning Cerebral HemispheresFemale Reproductive SystemEnd of Embryonic PeriodEnd of Embryonic PeriodFirst Thin Layer of Skin AppearsThird TrimesterSecond TrimesterFirst TrimesterFertilizationDevelopmental Timeline
Click weeks 0 - 40 and follow fetal growth
Google Search artcles published since 2007
 
May 6, 2011--------News Archive

Winter Conceptions at Greater Risk Of Autism
More than 7 million children born in California in the 1990s and early 2000s showed a clear link between their month of conception and their risk of a diagnosis of autism.

Manhood Is a 'Precarious' State
Difficult to earn and easy to lose,"manhood" is a fragile state of mind dependent on NO role violations.


May 5, 2011--------News Archive

Autism Enlarges Brain Before Age 2
Research from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill notes that 2-year-old autistic children's brains are up to 10 percent larger than non-autistic children.

Autism: Broken Neurons or Just Slowly Developing?
Developmental abnormalities in the mirror neuron system may in individuals with autism is not actually broken, but simply delayed.


May 4, 2011--------News Archive

New Mothers Learn A Lot From Their Babies
The best teacher for a young mother is her baby, say experts who train social workers to interact with first-time moms.

H1N1, Pregnant Women Were Right To Worry
Women with H1N1 gave birth to lower birth weight babies compared to those who had “influenza-like illness.”


May 3, 2011--------News Archive

Early Nutrition Has A Long-Term Metabolic Impact
Growth, hormonal profiles differ between breastfed and formula-fed infants,

Grandma Was Right: Infants Do Wake Up Taller
Science is finally confirming what grandma knew all along: infants wake up taller right after they sleep.


May 2, 2011--------News Archive

Maternal Obesity Puts Infants At Risk
Carrying too much weight during pregnancy could affect newborns' iron status and brain development.

Errors Put Infants, Children At Risk For Overdose
Prescriptions for narcotics often contain too much medication per dose.

WHO Child Growth Charts

An examination of the birth records of the more than 7 million children born in the state of California during the 1990s and early 2000s has found a clear link between the month in which a child is conceived and the risk of that child later receiving a diagnosis of autism.

Among the children included in the study, those conceived during winter had a significantly greater risk of autism, the study found.

The risk of having a child with an autism spectrum disorder grew progressively throughout the fall and winter to early spring, with children conceived in March having a 16 percent greater risk of later autism diagnoses, when compared with July conceptions.

The researchers said the finding suggests that environmental factors, for example, exposure to seasonal viruses like influenza, might play a role in the greater risk they found of children conceived during the winter having autism.

The study is published online today in the journal EPIDEMIOLOGY.

“The study finding was pronounced even after adjusting for factors such as maternal education, race /ethnicity, and the child’s year of conception,” said lead study author Ousseny Zerbo, a fifth-year doctoral student in the graduate group in epidemiology in the Department of Public Health Sciences in the UC Davis School of Medicine.

For the study, the researchers obtained the more than 7.2 million records for children born from January 1990 through December 2002 from the state of California Office of Vital Statistics. The researchers excluded some records because children did not survive to an age by which they typically would have been diagnosed with autism.

Other records were excluded because they were incomplete. For example, records that did not include adequate information from which to calculate the month of conception were excluded. The month of conception was calculated as the last date mothers reported having a menstrual period plus two weeks.

The total number of records finally included in the study was approximately 6.6 million, or 91 percent of all births recorded during the study period. The children were followed until their sixth birthdays to determine whether they would develop autism.

Children were diagnosed with autism by matching birth records with those receiving assistance from the state Department of Developmental Services (DDS). Approximately 19,000 cases of autism were identified, with autism defined as “full syndrome” autism in the DDS records.

The study found that the overall risk of having a child with autism increased from month to month during the winter through to the month of March. For the study, winter was considered the months of December, January and February. Each month was compared with July, with an 8 percent higher incidence in December, increasing to 16 percent higher in March.

Earlier studies’ findings about autism risk and month of conception or birth have had mixed results. Studies conducted in Israel, Sweden and Denmark, found an increased risk of autism for children born in March.

Studies conducted in Canada, Japan, the United States and the United Kingdom identified an increased risk of autism for children born in the spring. However, these studies were far smaller, most having a few hundred cases of autism, when compared with the large number in California.

"Studies of seasonal variations can provide clues about some of the underlying causes of autism. Based on this study, it may be fruitful to pursue exposures that show similar seasonal patterns, such as infections and mild nutritional deficiencies," said Irva Hertz-Picciotto, chief of the division of environmental and occupational health in the Department of Public Health Sciences in the UC Davis School of Medicine.

"However, it might be that conception is not the time of susceptibility. Rather, it could for instance be an exposure in the third month of pregnancy, or the second trimester, that is harmful," said Hertz-Picciotto, who also is a researcher affiliated with the UC Davis MIND Institute. "If so, we might need to look for exposures occurring a few months after conceptions that are at higher risk. For example, allergens that peak in the spring and early summer.”

Researchers believe the study is a starting point for further inquiry. Evidence of seasonal exposures, including pesticides used in the home to control insects in rainy or warm months, and pesticides used in seasonal agricultural applications, also need to be monitored and assessed.

Other study authors include Ana-Maria Iosif, Lora Delwiche and Cheryl Walker of the Department of Public Health Sciences in the UC Davis School of Medicine.

The study is funded by grants from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences of the National Institutes of Health.

At the UC Davis MIND Institute, world-renowned scientists engage in research to find improved treatments as well as the causes and cures for autism, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, fragile X syndrome, Tourette syndrome and other neurodevelopmental disorders. Advances in neuroscience, molecular biology, genetics, pharmacology and behavioral sciences are making inroads into a better understanding of brain function. The UC Davis MIND Institute draws from these and other disciplines to conduct collaborative, multidisciplinary research. For more information, visit mindinstitute.ucdavis.edu