Welcome to The Visible Embryo

Home- - -History-- -Bibliography- -Pregnancy Timeline- --Prescription Drugs in Pregnancy- -- Pregnancy Calculator- --Female Reproductive System- News Alerts -Contact

Welcome to The Visible Embryo, a comprehensive educational resource on human development from conception to birth.

The Visible Embryo provides visual references for changes in fetal development throughout pregnancy and can be navigated via fetal development or maternal changes.

The National Institutes of Child Health and Human Development awarded Phase I and Phase II Small Business Innovative Research Grants to develop The Visible Embryo. Initally designed to evaluate the internet as a teaching tool for first year medical students, The Visible Embryo is linked to over 600 educational institutions and is viewed by more than ' million visitors each month.


WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform
The World Health Organization (WHO) has created a new Web site to help researchers, doctors and patients obtain reliable information on high-quality clinical trials. Now you can go to one website and search all registers to identify clinical trial research underway around the world!



Home

History

Bibliography

Pregnancy Timeline

Prescription Drug Effects on Pregnancy

Pregnancy Calculator

Female Reproductive System

Contact The Visible Embryo

News Alerts Archive

Disclaimer: The Visible Embryo web site is provided for your general information only. The information contained on this site should not be treated as a substitute for medical, legal or other professional advice. Neither is The Visible Embryo responsible or liable for the contents of any websites of third parties which are listed on this site.
Content protected under a Creative Commons License.

No dirivative works may be made or used for commercial purposes.

Return To Top Of Page
Pregnancy Timeline by SemestersFemale Reproductive SystemFertilizationThe Appearance of SomitesFirst TrimesterSecond TrimesterThird TrimesterFetal liver is producing blood cellsHead may position into pelvisBrain convolutions beginFull TermWhite fat begins to be madeWhite fat begins to be madeHead may position into pelvisImmune system beginningImmune system beginningPeriod of rapid brain growthBrain convolutions beginLungs begin to produce surfactantSensory brain waves begin to activateSensory brain waves begin to activateInner Ear Bones HardenBone marrow starts making blood cellsBone marrow starts making blood cellsBrown fat surrounds lymphatic systemFetal sexual organs visibleFinger and toe prints appearFinger and toe prints appearHeartbeat can be detectedHeartbeat can be detectedBasic Brain Structure in PlaceThe Appearance of SomitesFirst Detectable Brain WavesA Four Chambered HeartBeginning Cerebral HemispheresEnd of Embryonic PeriodEnd of Embryonic PeriodFirst Thin Layer of Skin AppearsThird TrimesterDevelopmental Timeline
Click weeks 0 - 40 and follow fetal growth
Google Search artcles published since 2007
 
Home--History--Bibliography- -Pregnancy Timeline- Prescription Drugs/Pregnancy- Pregnancy Calculator - Reproductive System- -News Alerts

January 6, 2012--------News Archive

Fresh Embryos May Improve Assisted Reproduction
A new study highlights that miscarriage is less likely to occur after the transfer of fresh embryos compared to frozen-thawed embryos.

Air Pollution Link to Diabetes and Hypertension in African-American Women
The risk of diabetes increased by a significant 24 percent, and the risk of hypertension by 11 percent, with increased exposure to nitrogen oxides.

Poor Maternal Diet Can Increase Risk of Diabetes
A molecule called miR-483-3p is produced at higher levels in individuals who experienced a poor diet in their mother's wombs than those who better nourished.

January 5, 2012--------News Archive

Is Obesity in Infants “Programmed” in the Womb?
Omega 3 fatty acids eaten by pregnant women do not prevent expansive adipose tissue from developing in infants.

Progress Towards a Genital Herpes Vaccine
A vaccine under investigation protected some women against infection from one of the two types of herpes simplex the virus that causes genital herpes.

Rare Liver Disorder Kids Tolerate Mom's Graft Best
Children with a rare, life-threatening disease that is the most common cause of neonatal liver failure – biliary atresia – better tolerate liver transplants from their mothers than from their fathers, according to a UCSF-led study.

January 4, 2012--------News Archive

Simple Blood Test in First Trimester Reveals Gender
New research suggests that measuring the ratio of two enzymes in maternal blood will indicate fetal gender.

Nap-deprived Tots Missing Out On More Than Sleep
Toddlers between 2.5 and 3 years who miss only a single daily nap show more anxiety, less joy and interest and poor understanding of how to solve problems.

Women Susceptible to Infection When Ovulating
High levels of estradiol exist just prior to ovulation and decrease immune system effectiveness which can result in the growth and promotion of infection.

January 3, 2012--------News Archive

Gestational Diabetes Linked To Risk of ADHD
Maternal gestational diabetes mellitus and low socioeconomic status, appear to increase the risk of developing childhood ADHD.

Physical Activity, School Performance May Be Linked
By increasing blood and oxygen flow to the brain, and increasing endorphins which decrease stress, exercise helps improve academic performance.

January 2, 2012--------News Archive

Evolution Reveals Missing Link in DNA/Protein Shape
Despite knowing for the past 50 years that protein folds are determined by DNA sequence, fold shape complexity has limited development of disease treatments.

Bacteria Fights Fluoride in Toothpaste and in Nature
Research has uncovered the molecular tricks used by bacteria to fight the effects of fluoride, commonly used in toothpaste and mouthwash to combat tooth decay.

Gene Identified in Risk for Pancreatic Cancer
Approximately 10 percent of pancreatic cancer patients come from families with multiple cases of the disease. But finding the gene has been difficult.

WHO Child Growth Charts

What Is Your BMI?

       



A national research investigating a genital herpes vaccine in 8,000 women has made important headway in Herpes Simplex-1 (HSV-1) innoculation. The vaccine partially prevented herpes simplex HSV-1; however, it did not protect women from herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2).

The research was led by Robert Belshe, M.D., study results were reported in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Less than half of the cases of genital herpes caused by HSV-1, or 58 percent fewer - occrrred in women who received the investigational vaccine as compared to women who received the control vaccine.

"There is some very good news in our findings. We were partially successful against half of the equation -- protecting women from genital disease caused by HSV-1," said Robert Belshe, M.D., director of the Saint Louis University Center for Vaccine Development and lead author of the study.

"It's a big step along the path to creating an effective vaccine that protects against genital disease caused by herpes infection. It points us in the direction to work toward making a vaccine that works on both herpes simplex viruses."

Both HSV-1 and HSV-2 are members of the herpesvirus family. Typically, HSV-2 causes lesions and blisters in the genital area. HSV-1 generally causes sores in the mouth and lips, although it increasingly has been found to cause genital disease.

There currently is no cure or approved vaccine to prevent genital herpes infection, which affects about 25 percent of women in the United States and is one of the most common communicable diseases. Once inside the body, HSV remains there permanently. The virus can cause severe neurological disease and even death in infants born to women who are infected with HSV and the virus is a risk factor for sexual transmission of HIV.

The clinical trial of an investigational genital herpes vaccine was funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), which is part of the National Institutes of Health, along with GlaxoSmithKline (GSK), and conducted at 50 sites in the U.S. and Canada.

The study enrolled 8,323 women between ages 18 and 30 who did not have HSV-1 or HSV-2 infection at the start of the study. They were randomly assigned to receive either three doses of the investigational HSV vaccine that was developed by GSK or a hepatitis A vaccine, which was the control.

Participants were followed for 20 months and evaluated carefully for occurrence of genital herpes disease. In addition, all study participants were given blood tests to determine if asymptomatic infection with HSV-1 or HSV-2 occurred during the trial. Researchers found that two or three doses of the investigational vaccine offered significant protection against genital herpes disease caused by HSV-1. However the vaccine did not protect women from genital disease caused by HSV-2.

"We were surprised by these findings," said Belshe, who also is a professor of infectious diseases and immunology at Saint Louis University School of Medicine. "We didn't expect the herpes vaccine to protect against one type of herpes simplex virus and not another. We also found it surprising that HSV-1 was a more common cause of genital disease than was HSV-2."

HSV-1 infection has become an increasingly common cause of genital disease, likely because more couples are engaging in oral sex. HSV-1 and HSV-2 are spread by direct contact -- mouth to mouth, mouth to genitals and genitals to genitals -- even when the infected person shows no symptoms, Belshe added.

Researchers are conducting laboratory tests on serum obtained from study participants as they continue to study why the vaccine protected women from genital disease caused by HSV-1 and not HSV-2.

One hypothesis, Belshe said, is HSV-1 is more easily killed by antibodies than is HSV-2. This means that the vaccine antibodies might work better against HSV-1 and result in protection from HSV-1 but not HSV-2.

Earlier studies of the investigational herpes vaccines showed it protected against genital herpes disease in women who were not infected with HSV-1 or HSV-2, but whose sexual partners were known to have genital herpes. Researchers believe the reason for the different outcome in the most recent clinical trial could be related to the fact that different populations were studied. The women in the earlier studies may have been protected due to immunologic or behavioral factors not present in the later study.

"It's always important to confirm scientific findings in repeated studies, which is why we investigated the vaccine in a large, placebo controlled trial," Belshe said.

"Our findings confirmed the validity of the scientific process. You've got to have good scientific evidence that something actually works."

Established in 1836, Saint Louis University School of Medicine has the distinction of awarding the first medical degree west of the Mississippi River. The school educates physicians and biomedical scientists, conducts medical research, and provides health care on a local, national and international level. Research at the school seeks new cures and treatments in five key areas: cancer, infectious disease, liver disease, aging and brain disease and heart/lung disease.

Original article: http://www.slu.edu/x57441.xml