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Welcome to The Visible Embryo, a comprehensive educational resource on human development from conception to birth.

The Visible Embryo provides visual references for changes in fetal development throughout pregnancy and can be navigated via fetal development or maternal changes.

The National Institutes of Child Health and Human Development awarded Phase I and Phase II Small Business Innovative Research Grants to develop The Visible Embryo. Initally designed to evaluate the internet as a teaching tool for first year medical students, The Visible Embryo is linked to over 600 educational institutions and is viewed by more than ' million visitors each month.


WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform
The World Health Organization (WHO) has created a new Web site to help researchers, doctors and patients obtain reliable information on high-quality clinical trials. Now you can go to one website and search all registers to identify clinical trial research underway around the world!



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Disclaimer: The Visible Embryo web site is provided for your general information only. The information contained on this site should not be treated as a substitute for medical, legal or other professional advice. Neither is The Visible Embryo responsible or liable for the contents of any websites of third parties which are listed on this site.
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Pregnancy Timeline by SemestersFemale Reproductive SystemFertilizationThe Appearance of SomitesFirst TrimesterSecond TrimesterThird TrimesterFetal liver is producing blood cellsHead may position into pelvisBrain convolutions beginFull TermWhite fat begins to be madeWhite fat begins to be madeHead may position into pelvisImmune system beginningImmune system beginningPeriod of rapid brain growthBrain convolutions beginLungs begin to produce surfactantSensory brain waves begin to activateSensory brain waves begin to activateInner Ear Bones HardenBone marrow starts making blood cellsBone marrow starts making blood cellsBrown fat surrounds lymphatic systemFetal sexual organs visibleFinger and toe prints appearFinger and toe prints appearHeartbeat can be detectedHeartbeat can be detectedBasic Brain Structure in PlaceThe Appearance of SomitesFirst Detectable Brain WavesA Four Chambered HeartBeginning Cerebral HemispheresEnd of Embryonic PeriodEnd of Embryonic PeriodFirst Thin Layer of Skin AppearsThird TrimesterDevelopmental Timeline
Click weeks 0 - 40 and follow fetal growth
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Home--History--Bibliography- -Pregnancy Timeline- Prescription Drugs/Pregnancy- Pregnancy Calculator - Reproductive System- -News Alerts

January 6, 2012--------News Archive

Fresh Embryos May Improve Assisted Reproduction
A new study highlights that miscarriage is less likely to occur after the transfer of fresh embryos compared to frozen-thawed embryos.

Air Pollution Link to Diabetes and Hypertension in African-American Women
The risk of diabetes increased by a significant 24 percent, and the risk of hypertension by 11 percent, with increased exposure to nitrogen oxides.

Poor Maternal Diet Can Increase Risk of Diabetes
A molecule called miR-483-3p is produced at higher levels in individuals who experienced a poor diet in their mother's wombs than those who better nourished.

January 5, 2012--------News Archive

Is Obesity in Infants “Programmed” in the Womb?
Omega 3 fatty acids eaten by pregnant women do not prevent expansive adipose tissue from developing in infants.

Progress Towards a Genital Herpes Vaccine
A vaccine under investigation protected some women against infection from one of the two types of herpes simplex the virus that causes genital herpes.

Rare Liver Disorder Kids Tolerate Mom's Graft Best
Children with a rare, life-threatening disease that is the most common cause of neonatal liver failure – biliary atresia – better tolerate liver transplants from their mothers than from their fathers, according to a UCSF-led study.

January 4, 2012--------News Archive

Simple Blood Test in First Trimester Reveals Gender
New research suggests that measuring the ratio of two enzymes in maternal blood will indicate fetal gender.

Nap-deprived Tots Missing Out On More Than Sleep
Toddlers between 2.5 and 3 years who miss only a single daily nap show more anxiety, less joy and interest and poor understanding of how to solve problems.

Women Susceptible to Infection When Ovulating
High levels of estradiol exist just prior to ovulation and decrease immune system effectiveness which can result in the growth and promotion of infection.

January 3, 2012--------News Archive

Gestational Diabetes Linked To Risk of ADHD
Maternal gestational diabetes mellitus and low socioeconomic status, appear to increase the risk of developing childhood ADHD.

Physical Activity, School Performance May Be Linked
By increasing blood and oxygen flow to the brain, and increasing endorphins which decrease stress, exercise helps improve academic performance.

January 2, 2012--------News Archive

Evolution Reveals Missing Link in DNA/Protein Shape
Despite knowing for the past 50 years that protein folds are determined by DNA sequence, fold shape complexity has limited development of disease treatments.

Bacteria Fights Fluoride in Toothpaste and in Nature
Research has uncovered the molecular tricks used by bacteria to fight the effects of fluoride, commonly used in toothpaste and mouthwash to combat tooth decay.

Gene Identified in Risk for Pancreatic Cancer
Approximately 10 percent of pancreatic cancer patients come from families with multiple cases of the disease. But finding the gene has been difficult.

WHO Child Growth Charts

What Is Your BMI?

       



While it is well established that air pollution increases the risk of acute cardiovascular events such as stroke and myocardial infarction, it is not known whether exposure increases the risk of chronic diseases like diabetes and hypertension.

However, emerging findings from laboratory and clinical studies suggest that air pollution may predispose to both conditions.

The incidence of type 2 diabetes and hypertension increases with cumulative levels of exposure to nitrogen oxides, according to a new study led by researchers from the Slone Epidemiology Center (SEC) at Boston University. The study, appearing online in the journal Circulation, was led by Patricia Coogan, D.Sc., associate professor of epidemiology at the Boston University School of Public Health and the SEC.

Coogan's group assessed the incidents of hypertension and diabetes associated with exposure to nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM2.5) in a cohort of approximately 4,000 African American women living in Los Angeles.

NOx are indicators of traffic-related air pollution. From 1995-2005, 531 incident cases of hypertension and 183 incident cases of diabetes occurred among the participants in the Los Angeles area.

The risk of diabetes increased by a significant 24 percent, and the risk of hypertension by 11 percent, for each 12 parts per billion (ppb) increase in exposure to NOx. There also were increases in risks of both diseases associated with exposure to (PM2.5), but the evidence for this was weaker than for NOx.

According to the research, two previous follow-up studies have suggested that traffic-related pollution increased the incidence of diabetes, but no African Americans were included.

"A link between air pollution and the risks of diabetes and hypertension is of particular importance to African American women, because the incidence of both conditions is almost twice as high in African American women as in white women and African Americans live in more highly polluted areas than white Americans," said Patricia Coogan, D.Sc., the study's lead author.

"In addition, even a modest effect of air pollutants on the risks of hypertension and diabetes will have significant public health impact due to the high incidence of these conditions and the ubiquity of exposure to air pollution," she added.

Funding for this study was provided by the National Cancer Institute.

Original article: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2012-01/bumc-sfa010512.php