Welcome to The Visible Embryo

Home- - -History-- -Bibliography- -Pregnancy Timeline- --Prescription Drugs in Pregnancy- -- Pregnancy Calculator- --Female Reproductive System- News Alerts -Contact

Welcome to The Visible Embryo, a comprehensive educational resource on human development from conception to birth.

The Visible Embryo provides visual references for changes in fetal development throughout pregnancy and can be navigated via fetal development or maternal changes.

The National Institutes of Child Health and Human Development awarded Phase I and Phase II Small Business Innovative Research Grants to develop The Visible Embryo. Initally designed to evaluate the internet as a teaching tool for first year medical students, The Visible Embryo is linked to over 600 educational institutions and is viewed by more than ' million visitors each month.


WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform
The World Health Organization (WHO) has created a new Web site to help researchers, doctors and patients obtain reliable information on high-quality clinical trials. Now you can go to one website and search all registers to identify clinical trial research underway around the world!



Home

History

Bibliography

Pregnancy Timeline

Prescription Drug Effects on Pregnancy

Pregnancy Calculator

Female Reproductive System

Contact The Visible Embryo

News Alerts Archive

Disclaimer: The Visible Embryo web site is provided for your general information only. The information contained on this site should not be treated as a substitute for medical, legal or other professional advice. Neither is The Visible Embryo responsible or liable for the contents of any websites of third parties which are listed on this site.
Content protected under a Creative Commons License.

No dirivative works may be made or used for commercial purposes.

Return To Top Of Page
Pregnancy Timeline by SemestersFemale Reproductive SystemFertilizationThe Appearance of SomitesFirst TrimesterSecond TrimesterThird TrimesterFetal liver is producing blood cellsHead may position into pelvisBrain convolutions beginFull TermWhite fat begins to be madeWhite fat begins to be madeHead may position into pelvisImmune system beginningImmune system beginningPeriod of rapid brain growthBrain convolutions beginLungs begin to produce surfactantSensory brain waves begin to activateSensory brain waves begin to activateInner Ear Bones HardenBone marrow starts making blood cellsBone marrow starts making blood cellsBrown fat surrounds lymphatic systemFetal sexual organs visibleFinger and toe prints appearFinger and toe prints appearHeartbeat can be detectedHeartbeat can be detectedBasic Brain Structure in PlaceThe Appearance of SomitesFirst Detectable Brain WavesA Four Chambered HeartBeginning Cerebral HemispheresEnd of Embryonic PeriodEnd of Embryonic PeriodFirst Thin Layer of Skin AppearsThird TrimesterDevelopmental Timeline
Click weeks 0 - 40 and follow fetal growth
Google Search artcles published since 2007
 
Home--History--Bibliography- -Pregnancy Timeline- Prescription Drugs/Pregnancy- Pregnancy Calculator - Reproductive System- -News Alerts

February 10, 2012--------News Archive Return to: News Alerts


There are significant health risks with smaller babies. They tend to have more developmental
problems, become sick more often, and are more likely to die in their first year.

WHO Child Growth Charts

What Is Your BMI?

       

One Preterm Delivery Means Next Baby Will Be Small

Research has found that women who deliver their first baby early are more likely to have a subsequent baby also small for its gestational age, even if carried to term

The study, Prior Preterm Birth in First Pregnancy and Risk of Small-for-Gestational-Age Birth in Second Pregnancy: A Population-Based Study, will be presented at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting ™, in Dallas, Texas.

While there is much research that shows mothers who deliver their first babies early are more likely to have subsequent babies early, this study sought to determine whether mothers whose first babies are delivered early are more likely to have second babies that are small for their gestational age when the second pregnancy is carried to term.

"Obstetricians should know that mothers who deliver prematurely are more likely to have smaller babies in the subsequent full term pregnancy," said Jen Jen Chang, Ph.D., assistant professor at the department of epidemiology at the Saint Louis University School of Public Health and the study's lead author. "They should closely monitor fetal weight and fetal growth in mothers who have delivered early, even if the mothers are receiving treatments to prevent them from giving birth prematurely again."

Chang and his colleagues looked at the Missouri state birth certificate records of 197,556 women who were pregnant between 1989 and 2005. They included women younger than 45 who gave birth between 20 and 44 weeks of gestation. These women had "normal" pregnancies that were without medical complications such as hypertension, preeclampsia, diabetes or renal disease. The resulting babies were not breach births and did not have birth defects.

The findings indicate that if a mother delivered her first baby prematurely her second one is more likely to be small for gestational age, even if that baby arrived at the normal time (between 37 and 44 weeks of gestation) and the pregnancy was normal and uncomplicated.

In addition to Chang, the study was conducted by Lung-Chang Chien, Washington University in St. Louis, Siteman Cancer Center, St. Louis, Mo.; and George Macones, Washington University in St. Louis, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, St. Louis, Mo.

A copy of the abstract is available at http://www.smfmnewsroom.org/annual-meeting/2011-meeting-abstracts/. For interviews please contact Vicki Bendure at Vicki@bendurepr.com, 540-687-3360 (office) or 202-374-9259 (cell), or Jacqueline Boggess at jacqueline@bendurepr.com, 540-687-5399 (office) or 202-738-3054 (cell).

The Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine (est. 1977) is a non-profit membership group for obstetricians/gynecologists who have additional formal education and training in maternal-fetal medicine. The society is devoted to reducing high-risk pregnancy complications by providing continuing education to its 2,000 members on the latest pregnancy assessment and treatment methods. It also serves as an advocate for improving public policy, and expanding research funding and opportunities for maternal-fetal medicine.

The group hosts an annual scientific meeting in which new ideas and research in the area of maternal-fetal medicine are unveiled and discussed. For more information, visit www.smfm.org or www.facebook.com/SocietyforMaternalFetalMedicine.

Original article: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2012-02/sfmm-sfp_1020312.php