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Pregnancy Timeline by SemestersFemale Reproductive SystemFertilizationThe Appearance of SomitesFirst TrimesterSecond TrimesterThird TrimesterFetal liver is producing blood cellsHead may position into pelvisBrain convolutions beginFull TermWhite fat begins to be madeWhite fat begins to be madeHead may position into pelvisImmune system beginningImmune system beginningPeriod of rapid brain growthBrain convolutions beginLungs begin to produce surfactantSensory brain waves begin to activateSensory brain waves begin to activateInner Ear Bones HardenBone marrow starts making blood cellsBone marrow starts making blood cellsBrown fat surrounds lymphatic systemFetal sexual organs visibleFinger and toe prints appearFinger and toe prints appearHeartbeat can be detectedHeartbeat can be detectedBasic Brain Structure in PlaceThe Appearance of SomitesFirst Detectable Brain WavesA Four Chambered HeartBeginning Cerebral HemispheresEnd of Embryonic PeriodEnd of Embryonic PeriodFirst Thin Layer of Skin AppearsThird TrimesterDevelopmental Timeline
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March 22, 2012--------News Archive Return to: News Alerts

The discovery of biomarkers for optimal uterine receptivity and oocyte competence
will help improve the efficiency of assisted reproductive technologies (ART).

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Fertility problems, recurrent miscarriages, and pregnancy complications can occur when the mother's immune tolerance of the fetus is impaired

The evolution of the science of reproductive immunology shows us how the maternal-fetal tolerance/dialogue has developed, and its implications for the treatment of infertility disorders - according to Gérard Chaouat and colleagues from Inserm et Assistance Publique et Université Paris Sud Orsay, Hopital Antoine Bèclère, Clamart Cedex, France (now in Hopital Saint Louis, Paris).

Their study appears in a topical issue of Advances in Neuroimmune Biology on maternal-fetal interactions.

In the beginning, doctors in the field of reproductive immunology searched for explanations as to why the embryo was not rejected by the mother during pregnancy. They soon realized that the mother's immune system did not reject either paternal tissues or fetal tissues, and therefore must maintain some form of active recognition throughout pregnancy.

"There is no 'tolerance,' as is often written but indeed at least a part of the maternal immune system is stimulated and actively interacts with the fetal-placental unit," says Dr. Chaouat.

The active involvement of the mother's immune system was reinforced by observations in various mouse matings that paternal major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class 1, leads to prevention of fetal loss. This led to the realization that while some cytokines were useful for pregnancy, others were detrimental. A similar discovery found that although natural killer (NK) cells induce spontaneous abortion if improperly activated, they are normally useful and necessary for pregnancy, implantation, and local uterine blood vessel transformation.

Dr. Chaouat and colleagues at the Embryo Implantation Control project (a large scale collaborative EEC network program to support research on female infertility) have studied the control of NK activation by various interleukins (notably the interleukin (IL)-12, -18 NK tripod) as well as tumor necrosis factor-related weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK) in mice and humans.

In both mouse and human experiments, they discovered that TWEAK plays a role as an immune system regulator against toxicity to cells in order to protect the embryo.

Signals emitted by the embryo itself play a role in implantation and thus influence implantation rates. In a pilot study, the researchers measured the cytokine content of follicular fluid (FF) after oocyte collection and traced the fate of the subsequent embryos.

"The most salient result of these studies was the prediction of good quality and implantation level," says Dr. Chaouat.

"The level of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in individual follicular fluid samples was correlated with the implantation potential of the corresponding embryo in both natural and hyperstimulated cycles.

We found that a combination of both FF G-CSF and IL-15 was the optimal model to predict birth specifically in monitored natural cycles, while IL-15 was undetectable in hyperstimulated cycles. Such differences suggest that immune cell trafficking may be involved in the establishment of oocyte competency for implantation."

Recent work by Dr. Chaouat and colleagues centers on the discovery of biomarkers for optimal uterine receptivity and oocyte competence to improve the efficiency of assisted reproductive technology (ART).

"Quantification of IL-18, TWEAK, and IL-15 mRNA expression may be useful for physicians. Follicular concentration of G-CSF appears as a useful biomarker of oocyte competence before fertilization," Dr. Chaouat concludes.

Original article: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2012-03/ip-wma032112.php