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Pregnancy Timeline by SemestersFemale Reproductive SystemFertilizationThe Appearance of SomitesFirst TrimesterSecond TrimesterThird TrimesterFetal liver is producing blood cellsHead may position into pelvisBrain convolutions beginFull TermWhite fat begins to be madeWhite fat begins to be madeHead may position into pelvisImmune system beginningImmune system beginningPeriod of rapid brain growthBrain convolutions beginLungs begin to produce surfactantSensory brain waves begin to activateSensory brain waves begin to activateInner Ear Bones HardenBone marrow starts making blood cellsBone marrow starts making blood cellsBrown fat surrounds lymphatic systemFetal sexual organs visibleFinger and toe prints appearFinger and toe prints appearHeartbeat can be detectedHeartbeat can be detectedBasic Brain Structure in PlaceThe Appearance of SomitesFirst Detectable Brain WavesA Four Chambered HeartBeginning Cerebral HemispheresEnd of Embryonic PeriodEnd of Embryonic PeriodFirst Thin Layer of Skin AppearsThird TrimesterDevelopmental Timeline
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June 20, 2012--------News Archive Return to: News Alerts


The risk of developing breast cancer was 30% higher in women who had
worked nights compared to women who had never worked nights.


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Does Night Work Put Women's Health at Risk?

The risk factors of breast cancer are varied, including genetic mutations, late first pregnancy, low parity, or hormone therapy, but way of life, environmental or professional causes have not yet been completely identified

Breast cancer is the number one cause of female mortality. It affects 100 out of 100,000 women per year in developed countries. Each year, more than 1.3 million new cases are diagnosed, 53,000 of these in France.


In 2010, based on experimental and epidemiological work, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classified work that disturbed the circadian rhythm as being "probably carcinogenic."


The circadian rhythm regulates the alternation between wakefulness and sleep, controls numerous biological functions and is altered in people who work at night or who have disrupted working hours. Several hypotheses have been put forward to explain the observed links between night work and breast cancer: exposure to light during the night, that eliminates the nocturnal melatonin surge and its anti-carcinogenic effects, disturbed functioning of the biological clock genes that control cell proliferation, or sleep disorders that can weaken the immune system.

So the Inserm researchers examined the effect of night work on the health of women in a major population study carried out in France between 2005 and 2008. The careers of 3000 women were examined, including each period of night work. In total, over 11% of women had worked nights at some time during their career.

Research results are published in the International Journal of Cancer.

The risk of developing breast cancer was 30% higher in women who had worked nights compared to women who had never worked nights. This increased risk was particularly marked in women who had worked nights for over four years, or in women whose working rhythm was less than 3 nights per week, because this led to more frequent disturbances between night and day rhythms.


Finally, the link between night work and breast cancer seemed to be more marked when we looked at women who had worked at night prior to a first pregnancy. An explanation for this result could be that the mammary cells, incompletely differentiated in women before their first pregnancy, are more vulnerable.


"Our work has corroborated the results of previous studies and poses the problem of taking night work into consideration in public health management, especially since the number of women working atypical hours is on the increase," states Pascal Guénel, the main author of this work.

Night work and breast cancer: a population-based case-control study in France (the CECILE study) Florence Menegaux1,2, Thérèse Truong1,2, Antoinette Anger1,2, Emilie Cordina-Duverger1,2, Farida Lamkarkach1,2, Patrick Arveux3, Pierre Kerbrat4, Joëlle Févotte5, Pascal Guénel1,2,5

1 Inserm, CESP Centre for research in Epidemiology and Population Health, U1018, Environmental Epidemiology of Cancer, F-94807, Villejuif, France
2 Univ Paris-Sud, UMRS 1018, F-94807, Villejuif, France
3 Centre Georges-François Leclerc, Département d'informatique médicale (Department of medical informatics), Dijon, France
4 Centre Eugène Marquis, Rennes, France
5 Institut de Veille Sanitaire (Health watch institute) (InVS), Department of Occupational Health, Saint-Maurice, France

Research contact
Pascal Guénel, Research director, Inserm
Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health
Tel: 01 45 59 50 27
E-mail: pascal.guenel@inserm.fr

Original article: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2012-06/ind-dnw061912.php