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Pregnancy Timeline by SemestersFemale Reproductive SystemFertilizationThe Appearance of SomitesFirst TrimesterSecond TrimesterThird TrimesterFetal liver is producing blood cellsHead may position into pelvisBrain convolutions beginFull TermWhite fat begins to be madeWhite fat begins to be madeHead may position into pelvisImmune system beginningImmune system beginningPeriod of rapid brain growthBrain convolutions beginLungs begin to produce surfactantSensory brain waves begin to activateSensory brain waves begin to activateInner Ear Bones HardenBone marrow starts making blood cellsBone marrow starts making blood cellsBrown fat surrounds lymphatic systemFetal sexual organs visibleFinger and toe prints appearFinger and toe prints appearHeartbeat can be detectedHeartbeat can be detectedBasic Brain Structure in PlaceThe Appearance of SomitesFirst Detectable Brain WavesA Four Chambered HeartBeginning Cerebral HemispheresEnd of Embryonic PeriodEnd of Embryonic PeriodFirst Thin Layer of Skin AppearsThird TrimesterDevelopmental Timeline
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June 29, 2012--------News Archive Return to: News Alerts


A partner is needed to inject the mom with fertility drugs for one form of ART.

WHO Child Growth Charts

       

Success of Fertility Treatment May Approach Natural Birth Rate

A groundbreaking study of nearly 250,000 U.S. women reveals live birth rates approaching natural fertility can be achieved using assisted reproductive technology

Assisted reproductive technology (ART) is where eggs are removed from a woman’s ovaries, combined with sperm and then returned to the woman’s body for continuation to a normal 9 month pregnancy.

The research, led by Michigan State University’s Barbara Luke and published in the New England Journal of Medicine, highlights what factors help or hinder getting pregnant using ART. The results indicate that when there are favorable patient and embryo characteristics, live birth rates with ART can approach those of natural fertility.

“This is good news for women who are trying to have a child,” said Luke, a researcher in the College of Human Medicine's Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology.

The number of ART treatments has more than doubled in the past 10 years, and live birth rates traditionally have been reported per cycle, or per one course of treatment. While that is easily calculated and is the method used by national registries across the world, Luke’s team sought to estimate cumulative success rates with continued treatment.

“Women and families want to know the overall chances they will get pregnant, not necessarily whether they will get pregnant during a specific cycle,” Luke said.

Data were obtained from the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology’s Clinic Outcome Reporting System for women undergoing treatment between 2004 and 2009. The system contains data on more than 90 percent of all clinics performing ART treatments in the United States.

The study of 246,740 women revealed 57 percent of women achieved a live birth via ART treatment, and 30 percent of all ART cycles resulted in a live birth. Success rates declined with increasing age for women using their own eggs, especially for those ages 38 years and older, but not for women using donor eggs.

The estimated natural fertility rate of the general population is about 20 percent per month, and estimated rates of conceiving spontaneously are 45 percent, 65 percent and 85 percent after three, six and 12 months, respectively.

The study looked at factors such as patient age, diagnosis, response to treatment, cryopreservation and the stage at which embryos were transferred. Two major factors that influence ART success are favorable patient characteristics (specifically age) and good embryo quality. Among older women, live birth rates can be substantially improved with continued treatment and a change to donor eggs.

“Although the decision to use donor eggs is a very personal one, these analyses provide information regarding the likelihood of a live birth using this option,” said Luke.

These results also could guide regulations governing health insurance coverage for infertility treatment. The number of treatment cycles covered by insurance is typically limited to two or three. The findings demonstrate that when using a woman’s own eggs, the success rates continue to rise beyond two to three cycles; additionally, the study may help providers and women decide when it is appropriate to change to donor eggs.

The study team was made up of researchers from MSU, University of Michigan, Redshift Technologies in New York, Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Cornell Medical Center in New York, Columbia University Medical Center in New York, Spectrum Health Medical Group in Grand Rapids and Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center at Dartmouth College in New Hampshire.

Michigan State University has been working to advance the common good in uncommon ways for more than 150 years. One of the top research universities in the world, MSU focuses its vast resources on creating solutions to some of the world’s most pressing challenges, while providing life-changing opportunities to a diverse and inclusive academic community through more than 200 programs of study in 17 degree-granting colleges.

Original article: http://news.msu.edu/story/success-of-fertility-treatment-may-approach-natural-birth-rate/