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Welcome to The Visible Embryo, a comprehensive educational resource on human development from conception to birth.

The Visible Embryo provides visual references for changes in fetal development throughout pregnancy and can be navigated via fetal development or maternal changes.

The National Institutes of Child Health and Human Development awarded Phase I and Phase II Small Business Innovative Research Grants to develop The Visible Embryo. Initally designed to evaluate the internet as a teaching tool for first year medical students, The Visible Embryo is linked to over 600 educational institutions and is viewed by more than ' million visitors each month.


WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform
The World Health Organization (WHO) has created a new Web site to help researchers, doctors and patients obtain reliable information on high-quality clinical trials. Now you can go to one website and search all registers to identify clinical trial research underway around the world!



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Pregnancy Timeline by SemestersFemale Reproductive SystemFertilizationThe Appearance of SomitesFirst TrimesterSecond TrimesterThird TrimesterFetal liver is producing blood cellsHead may position into pelvisBrain convolutions beginFull TermWhite fat begins to be madeWhite fat begins to be madeHead may position into pelvisImmune system beginningImmune system beginningPeriod of rapid brain growthBrain convolutions beginLungs begin to produce surfactantSensory brain waves begin to activateSensory brain waves begin to activateInner Ear Bones HardenBone marrow starts making blood cellsBone marrow starts making blood cellsBrown fat surrounds lymphatic systemFetal sexual organs visibleFinger and toe prints appearFinger and toe prints appearHeartbeat can be detectedHeartbeat can be detectedBasic Brain Structure in PlaceThe Appearance of SomitesFirst Detectable Brain WavesA Four Chambered HeartBeginning Cerebral HemispheresEnd of Embryonic PeriodEnd of Embryonic PeriodFirst Thin Layer of Skin AppearsThird TrimesterDevelopmental Timeline
Click weeks 0 - 40 and follow fetal growth
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July 2, 2012--------News Archive Return to: News Alerts


Neural cell (GREEN), nucleus (BLUE) in Barrister-Winston Syndrome

WHO Child Growth Charts

       

New Gene Mutations that Lead to Enlarged Brain Size, Cancer, Autism, Epilepsy

Researchers shed light on molecular cause of childhood’s worst conditions as first step toward developing more effective treatments

A research team led by Seattle Children’s Research Institute has discovered new gene mutations associated with markedly enlarged brain size, or megalencephaly. Mutations in three genes, AKT3, PIK3R2 and PIK3CA, were also found to be associated with a constellation of disorders including cancer, hydrocephalus, epilepsy, autism, vascular anomalies and skin growth disorders. The study, “De novo germline and postzygotic mutations in AKT3, PIK3R2 and PIK3CA cause a spectrum of related megalencephaly syndromes,” was published online June 24 in Nature Genetics.

The discovery offers several important lessons and hope for the future in medicine. First, the research team discovered additional proof that the genetic make-up of a person is not completely determined at the moment of conception. Researchers previously recognized that genetic changes may occur after conception, but this was believed to be quite rare. Second, discovery of the genetic causes of these human diseases, including developmental disorders, may also lead directly to new possibilities for treatment.

AKT3, PIK3R2 and PIK3CA are present in all humans, but mutations in the genes are what lead to conditions including megalencephaly, cancer and other disorders. PIK3CA is a known cancer-related gene, and appears able to make cancer more aggressive. Scientists at Boston Children’s Hospital recently published similar findings related to PIK3CA and a rare condition known as CLOVES syndrome in the American Journal of Human Genetics.

Physician researcher James Olson, MD, PhD, a pediatric cancer expert at Seattle Children’s and Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center who was not affiliated with the study, acknowledged the two decades-worth of work that led to the findings.

“This study represents ideal integration of clinical medicine and cutting-edge genomics,” he said. “I hope and believe that the research will establish a foundation for successfully using drugs that were originally developed to treat cancer in a way that helps normalize intellectual and physical development of affected children. The team ‘knocked it out of the park’ by deep sequencing exceptionally rare familial cases and unrelated cases to identify the culprit pathway.” The genes— AKT3, PIK3R2 and PIK3CA—all encode core components of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (P13K)/AKT pathway, the “culprit pathway” referenced by Olson.

The research provides a first, critical step in solving the mystery behind chronic childhood conditions and diseases. At the bedside, children with these conditions could see new treatments in the next decade.

“This is a huge finding that provides not only new insight for certain brain malformations, but also, and more importantly, provides clues for what to look for in less severe cases and in conditions that affect many children,” said William Dobyns, MD, a geneticist at Seattle Children’s Research Institute. “Kids with cancer, for example, do not have a brain malformation, but they may have subtle growth features that haven’t yet been identified. Physicians and researchers can now take an additional look at these genes in the search for underlying causes and answers.”

Researchers at Seattle Children’s Research Institute will now delve more deeply into the findings, with an aim to uncover even more about the potential medical implications for children. “Based on what we’ve found, we believe that we can eventually reduce the burden of and need for surgery for kids with hydrocephalus and change the way we treat other conditions, including cancer, autism and epilepsy,” said Jean-Baptiste Rivière, PhD, at Seattle Children’s Research Institute. “This research truly helps advance the concept of personalized medicine.”

Drs. Dobyns, Rivière and team made this discovery through exome sequencing, a strategy used to selectively sequence the coding regions of the genome as an inexpensive but effective alternative to whole genome sequencing. An exome is the most functionally relevant part of a genome, and is most likely to contribute to the phenotype, or observed traits and characteristics, of an organism.

BACKGROUND ON RESEARCHERS
Seattle Children’s Research Institute conducted this study in collaboration with teams from University of Washington Genome Sciences Department, FORGE (Finding of Rare Disease Genes) Canada Consortium, Cedars Sinai Medical Center and University of Sussex.

Dr. Dobyns, who is also a UW professor of pediatrics, is a renowned researcher whose life-long work has been to try to identify the causes of children’s developmental brain disorders such as megalencephaly. He discovered the first known chromosome abnormality associated with lissencephaly (Miller-Dieker syndrome) while still in training in child neurology at Texas Children’s Hospital in 1983. That research led, 10 years later, to the discovery by Dobyns and others of the first lissencephaly gene known as LIS1.

Dr. Rivière is supported by a Banting Postdoctoral Fellowship from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research. As a lead researcher in the Dobyns lab, he also identified two new genes that cause Baraitser-Winter syndrome, a rare smooth brain malformation.

Co-authors on this study include: Jean-Baptiste Rivière, PhD, Banting Postdoctoral Fellow at Seattle Children’s Research Institute; Judith St-Onge, Seattle Children’s Research Institute; Christopher Sullivan, Seattle Children’s Research Institute; Thomas Ward, Seattle Children’s Research Institute; Ghayda Mirzaa, MD, University of Chicago; Brian O’Roak, PhD, University of Washington; Jay Shendure, MD, PhD, University of Washington; Mark O’Driscoll, PhD, University of Sussex; John Graham, MD, ScD, Cedars Sinai Medical Center; Kym Boycott, MD, PhD, University of Ottawa, Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario; and many other physicians and scientists from North America and Europe.

About Seattle Children’s Research Institute
Located in downtown Seattle’s biotech corridor, Seattle Children’s Research Institute is pushing the boundaries of medical research to find cures for pediatric diseases and improve outcomes for children all over the world. Internationally recognized investigators and staff at the research institute are advancing new discoveries in cancer, genetics, immunology, pathology, infectious disease, injury prevention and bioethics, among others. As part of Seattle Children’s Hospital, the research institute brings together leading minds in pediatric research to provide patients with the best care possible. Seattle Children’s serves as the primary teaching, clinical and research site for the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Washington School of Medicine, which consistently ranks as one of the best pediatric departments in the country. For more information, visit http://www.seattlechildrens.org/research.

Original article: http://www.seattlechildrens.org/media/press-detail.aspx?id=503422