Welcome to The Visible Embryo

Home- - -History-- -Bibliography- -Pregnancy Timeline- --Prescription Drugs in Pregnancy- -- Pregnancy Calculator- --Female Reproductive System- News Alerts -Contact

Welcome to The Visible Embryo, a comprehensive educational resource on human development from conception to birth.

The Visible Embryo provides visual references for changes in fetal development throughout pregnancy and can be navigated via fetal development or maternal changes.

The National Institutes of Child Health and Human Development awarded Phase I and Phase II Small Business Innovative Research Grants to develop The Visible Embryo. Initally designed to evaluate the internet as a teaching tool for first year medical students, The Visible Embryo is linked to over 600 educational institutions and is viewed by more than ' million visitors each month.


WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform
The World Health Organization (WHO) has created a new Web site to help researchers, doctors and patients obtain reliable information on high-quality clinical trials. Now you can go to one website and search all registers to identify clinical trial research underway around the world!



Home

History

Bibliography

Pregnancy Timeline

Prescription Drug Effects on Pregnancy

Pregnancy Calculator

Female Reproductive System

Contact The Visible Embryo

News Alerts Archive

Disclaimer: The Visible Embryo web site is provided for your general information only. The information contained on this site should not be treated as a substitute for medical, legal or other professional advice. Neither is The Visible Embryo responsible or liable for the contents of any websites of third parties which are listed on this site.
Content protected under a Creative Commons License.

No dirivative works may be made or used for commercial purposes.

Return To Top Of Page
Pregnancy Timeline by SemestersFemale Reproductive SystemFertilizationThe Appearance of SomitesFirst TrimesterSecond TrimesterThird TrimesterFetal liver is producing blood cellsHead may position into pelvisBrain convolutions beginFull TermWhite fat begins to be madeWhite fat begins to be madeHead may position into pelvisImmune system beginningImmune system beginningPeriod of rapid brain growthBrain convolutions beginLungs begin to produce surfactantSensory brain waves begin to activateSensory brain waves begin to activateInner Ear Bones HardenBone marrow starts making blood cellsBone marrow starts making blood cellsBrown fat surrounds lymphatic systemFetal sexual organs visibleFinger and toe prints appearFinger and toe prints appearHeartbeat can be detectedHeartbeat can be detectedBasic Brain Structure in PlaceThe Appearance of SomitesFirst Detectable Brain WavesA Four Chambered HeartBeginning Cerebral HemispheresEnd of Embryonic PeriodEnd of Embryonic PeriodFirst Thin Layer of Skin AppearsThird TrimesterDevelopmental Timeline
Click weeks 0 - 40 and follow fetal growth
Search artcles published since 2007

July 5, 2012--------News Archive Return to: News Alerts


Amniocentesis procedure.

WHO Child Growth Charts

       

Amniotic Fluid Alternative to Embryonic Stem Cells

Stem cells found in amniotic fluid can be transformed into a more versatile state similar to embryonic stem cells, and stored for therapy and research

Amniotic fluid surrounds and nourishes the fetus in the womb. It can be extracted through the mother's abdomen using a needle in a process called amniocentesis, which is sometimes used to test for genetic diseases. The fluid contains stem cells that come from the fetus. These cells have a more limited capacity to develop into different cell types than stem cells in the embryo.

Scientists from Imperial College London and the UCL Institute of Child Health succeeded in reprogramming amniotic fluid cells without having to introduce extra genes.

The research is published in the journal Molecular Therapy.


The findings raise the possibility that stem cells derived from
donated amniotic fluid could be stored in banks
and used for therapies and in research,
providing a viable alternative to the limited
embryonic stem cells currently available.


The researchers used stem cells from amniotic fluid donated by mothers undergoing amniocentesis for other purposes during the first trimester of pregnancy.

The cells were grown on a gelatinous protein mixture in the lab and reprogrammed into a more primitive state by adding a drug called valproic acid to the culture medium. An extensive set of tests found that these reprogrammed cells have characteristics very similar to embryonic stem cells, which are capable of developing into any cell type in the body – a property known as pluripotency.

Even after growing in culture for some time, the reprogrammed cells were able to develop into functioning cells of many different types, including liver, bone and nerve cells. They also maintained their pluripotency even after being frozen and rethawed.

The results suggest that stem cells derived from amniotic fluid could be used in treatments for a wide range of diseases. Donated cells could be stored in banks and not only used in therapy, but also in disease research and drug screening.


A previous study estimated that cells from 150 donors
would provide a match for 38% of the population.


Alternatives to embryonic stem cells are keenly sought because of ethical concerns and limited availability of donor embryos. Previous research has shown that it is possible to make adult cells become pluripotent by introducing extra genes into the cells, often using viruses. However, the efficiency of the reprogramming is very low and there is a risk of problems such as tumours caused by disrupting the DNA.

The new study is the first to induce pluripotency in human cells without using foreign genetic material. The pluripotent cells derived from amniotic fluid also showed some traits associated with embryonic stem cells that have not been found in induced pluripotent stem cells from other sources.

Amniocentesis is associated with a small risk of causing a miscarriage, estimated to be about one in 100.

Dr Pascale Guillot, from the Department of Surgery and Cancer at Imperial, said: "Amniotic fluid stem cells are intermediate between embryonic stem cells and adult stem cells. They have some potential to develop into different cell types but they are not pluripotent. We've shown that they can revert to being pluripotent just by adding a chemical reagent that modifies the configuration of the DNA so that genes that are expressed in the embryo get switched back on.

These cells have a wide range of potential applications in treatments and in research. We are particularly interested in exploring their use in genetic diseases diagnosed early in life or other diseases such as cerebral palsy."

Dr Paolo De Coppi, from the UCL Institute of Child Health, who jointly led the study with Dr Guillot, said: "This study confirms that amniotic fluid is a good source of stem cells. The advantages of generating pluripotent cells without any genetic manipulation make them more likely to be used for therapy.

At GOSH we have focused on building organs and tissues for the repair of congenital malformations, which are usually diagnosed during pregnancy. Finding the way of generating pluripotent cells from the fluid that surround the fetus in the womb move us one step further in the this direction."

The children's charity Action Medical Research are funding the researchers to explore the therapeutic benefits of transplanting donated placental stem cells from healthy babies to babies with brittle bone disease.

Dr Caroline Johnston, Research Evaluation Manager with children's charity Action Medical Research said: "These new findings could be a step forward for treatments of a wide range of diseases that affect babies and children. We are proud of our history of funding medical breakthroughs and of our support for these researchers in their move towards life changing therapies."

The study was funded by the Genesis Research Trust, the Henry Smith Charity and Action Medical Research.

Original article: http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/newsandeventspggrp/imperialcollege
/newssummary/news_3-7-2012-14-3-55