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Welcome to The Visible Embryo, a comprehensive educational resource on human development from conception to birth.

The Visible Embryo provides visual references for changes in fetal development throughout pregnancy and can be navigated via fetal development or maternal changes.

The National Institutes of Child Health and Human Development awarded Phase I and Phase II Small Business Innovative Research Grants to develop The Visible Embryo. Initally designed to evaluate the internet as a teaching tool for first year medical students, The Visible Embryo is linked to over 600 educational institutions and is viewed by more than one million visitors each month.

Today, The Visible Embryo is linked to over 600 educational institutions and is viewed by more than 1 million visitors each month. The field of early embryology has grown to include the identification of the stem cell as not only critical to organogenesis in the embryo, but equally critical to organ function and repair in the adult human. The identification and understanding of genetic malfunction, inflammatory responses, and the progression in chronic disease, begins with a grounding in primary cellular and systemic functions manifested in the study of the early embryo.

WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform


The World Health Organization (WHO) has created a new Web site to help researchers, doctors and patients obtain reliable information on high-quality clinical trials. Now you can go to one website and search all registers to identify clinical trial research underway around the world!





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Disclaimer: The Visible Embryo web site is provided for your general information only. The information contained on this site should not be treated as a substitute for medical, legal or other professional advice. Neither is The Visible Embryo responsible or liable for the contents of any websites of third parties which are listed on this site.


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Pregnancy Timeline by SemestersDevelopmental TimelineFertilizationFirst TrimesterSecond TrimesterThird TrimesterFirst Thin Layer of Skin AppearsEnd of Embryonic PeriodEnd of Embryonic PeriodFemale Reproductive SystemBeginning Cerebral HemispheresA Four Chambered HeartFirst Detectable Brain WavesThe Appearance of SomitesBasic Brain Structure in PlaceHeartbeat can be detectedHeartbeat can be detectedFinger and toe prints appearFinger and toe prints appearFetal sexual organs visibleBrown fat surrounds lymphatic systemBone marrow starts making blood cellsBone marrow starts making blood cellsInner Ear Bones HardenSensory brain waves begin to activateSensory brain waves begin to activateFetal liver is producing blood cellsBrain convolutions beginBrain convolutions beginImmune system beginningWhite fat begins to be madeHead may position into pelvisWhite fat begins to be madePeriod of rapid brain growthFull TermHead may position into pelvisImmune system beginningLungs begin to produce surfactant
CLICK ON weeks 0 - 40 and follow along every 2 weeks of fetal development




 

Jul 22, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Virus found in women with unexplained infertility
A new study has found that a little-known human herpesvirus — HHV-6A — infects the uterine lining in 43% of women with unexplained infertility. It was not found in fertile women.

Jul 21, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Pregnant nicotine exposure higher than reported

More women may be smoking and/or exposed to nicotine during pregnancy than previously thought, says a new study from Cincinnati Children's Hospital in collaboration with Cradle Cincinnati.

Jul 20, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Cells send out stop/go signals to extend nerves

Molecules can send signals across great distances to make neurons extend as well as retract their growth.

Jul 19, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Anatomy of a decision
In the first genome-scale experiment of its kind, researchers have seen how a mouse embryo first transforms from a ball of unfocussed cells (gastrula) into a structured embryo.

Jul 18, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Sound waves to separate twin placentas?

High-energy sound waves could treat a potentially deadly complication of some twin pregnancies — TTTS or Twin-Twin Transfusion Syndrome, affecting one in seven identical twin pregnancies.

Jul 15, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Selfish mitochondria implicated in diseases
Mitochondria produce most of the chemical energy that powers a cell. Likewise, their dysfunction is associated with a wide variety of illnesses: autism, Alzheimer's, dementia, schizophrenia, Parkinson's, epilepsy, stroke, cancer, chronic fatigue syndrome as well as cardiovascular disease.

Jul 14, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Powering up: growing neurons make an energy jump

Our brains can survive only for a few minutes without oxygen. Research has now identified that a dramatic metabolic shift occurs in developing neurons, from glucose to oxygen as their primary source of energy.

Jul 13, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Virus in pregnancy linked to austim disorders

Findings in mice may help explain how viral infection during pregnancy raises the risk for autism and schizophrenia in mouse pups — and humans.

Jul 12, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Bipolar disorder link to striatum brain region

Bipolar disorder is one of the most-studied neurological disorders. The Greeks noticed symptoms of the disease in the first century. But, science has been overlooking a possible brain region for its source - the striatum.

Jul 11, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Epigenetics could explain puzzle of diabetes inheritance

A mother's diet in pregnancy can permanently affect her child — and could be strongly influenced by genetic variation in an unexpected part of the genome — her ribosomal DNA.

Jul 7, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Many common chemicals endanger brain development

Scientists, health practitioners and child advocates are calling attention to growing evidence that common and widely used chemicals endanger neurodevelopment in the fetus as well as in children of all ages.

Jul 6, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Children's immune cells may explain all their illnesses

New research shows immune systems of young mice secrete low levels of the cytokine — CD4 T — needed for survival during infection. By comparison, older mice secret more.

Jul 6, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

"Feeling good" stimulates immune system

Feeling good may help our bodies fight germs better, according to results from experiments with mice. When activated, nerve cells that signal emotional reward also boost mouse immune systems.

Jul 5, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How the Pentagone protein controls development
How do the cells in a human embryo know their current location — or where to go next? Why do some cells form a finger, but not others? University of Freiburg biologists in Germany believe the protein Pentagone controls these steps in the fruit fly — and perhaps in humans as well.

Jul 4, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Why does mitochondria DNA only come from mom?

Like most cells, sperm contain energy-producing mitochondria. However, once a sperm fertilizes an egg, its own mitochondria break down. Scientists have a new clue to why the most mitochondrial DNA is passed down to children from their mothers — and not their fathers.

Jul 1, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Finding human development's first gear
A research team has identified that 4 genes operate for only a few hours in the earliest stages of life, to perform as "first gear'" in the shift into a human embryo.

Jun 30, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Study shows Zika infection longer in pregnancy

Research with monkeys has shown that a first infection with the Zika virus protects against future infections. But with pregnancy, Zika stays in the body a drastically long time.

Jun 29, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Daughters of obese mouse dads risk breast cancer

Obese male mice and normal weight female mice produce female pups that are overweight at birth through childhood, have delayed development of their breast tissue, and have increased rates of breast cancer.

Jun 28, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

CDC clinical trial for experimental Zika vaccine

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has approved clinical trial status for another experimental Zika vaccine. The drug will be tested on a small sample of human participants, a mere five months after the World Health Organization declared Zika a public health emergency.

Jun 27, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Saint Louis University to launch Zika vaccine trial

Saint Louis University's (SLU) vaccine center has been tapped by the National Institutes of Health to conduct a human clinical trial of a vaccine to prevent the Zika virus, which can cause devastating birth defects in babies.

Jun 24, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Loss of essential protein linked to hydrocephalus
Researchers at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital have developed mice lacking the Alix protein, in order to study hydrocephalus or "water on the brain." Alix orients epithelial cells in the brain's choroid plexus in order to prevent compromises to the brain's barrier layer.

Jun 23, 2016
-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Low thyroid in pregnancy risks schizophrenia in baby
Study links a mother's untreated low thyroid hormone levels during pregnancy with a 2% increased risk for her child having neurodevelopmental disorders — such as autism, bipolar disorder or schizophrenia.

Jun 22, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Teen poor attention control risk for anxiety disorders
Research has found that poor attention control in the early teen years is related to a genetic risk factor that can latter appear in the adult as an anxiety disorder — presenting as (1) educational underachievement, (2) depression, (3) drug dependence, or perhaps even (4) suicidal behavior.

Jun 21, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Pregnant diet can affect multiple generations
New research suggests that even before becomming pregnant, women who eat high-fat, high-sugar diets can predispose multiple generations to metabolic problems, even though their children consume healthy diets.

Jun 20, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

New insights uncovered in Prader-Willi syndrome
Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a rare genetic disease characterized by hyperphagia — a chronic feeling of hunger — coupled with a metabolism that uses drastically fewer calories than normal, leading to excessive eating/obesity in patients with the disease.

Jun 17, 2016
-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Breastmilk best for premature baby's heart
For the first time, breastfeeding is linked to better cardiac structure and function in adults born prematurely.

Jun 16, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Gene mutation found explaining multiple sclerosis

Although multiple sclerosis (MS) is seen to run in certain families, attempts to find genes linked to the disease have been elusive. For the first time, researchers are now reporting a gene mutation connected directly to the disease.

Jun 15, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Individuals respond differently to Zika?
One of Zika's mysteries is how the virus passes from an infected mother, through the placenta, to a developing fetus. The route may not be direct either — transmission via multiple cell types may be necessary as it is transmitted through several routes, including mosquito bites, sexual contact, and blood transfusion.

Jun 14, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Moving can be hazardous to your child's health

Adverse effects were found in adults who had to change homes in childhood, according to a long-term study of 1.4 million Danish children.

Jun 13, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How melanin gives color to skin, hair and eyes
A year and a half ago, Brown University researchers found a molecular gas pedal that increases melanin production. Now, they have found its brake. Understanding how color enters our eyes, skin and hair, helps explain albinism, or when color doesn't get produced at all.

Jun 10, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Babies really are cute!
What is it about the sight of an infant that makes almost everyone smile? Big eyes, dewy skin, chubby cheeks, that little nose? An infectious laugh and a captivating smell? While we agree that babies look cute, Oxford University research has found cuteness is designed to appeal to every sense.

Jun 9, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Your biological clock has a time stamp
Yale School of Medicine researchers have identified the molecular paths involved in aging of human eggs. Such research may eventually lead to correcting age-related damage and improve fertility in women 40 years and older.

Jun 8, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Maternal effects of smoking continue long after birth

According to a new Yale-led study, early exposure to nicotine can trigger widespread genetic changes that affect brain cell synapses long after birth. The findings help explain why maternal smoking links to behavior changes such as attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder and addiction.

Jun 7, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

A brain clock keeps our memories ticking

Just as members of an orchestra need a conductor to stay on tempo, neurons in the brain need well-timed waves of synapses to organize memories.

Jun 6, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Gene sequencing diagnoses rare newborn diseases

Canada is examining the need for next-generation gene sequencing of newborns in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Their hope is to improve the diagnosis of rare diseases and deliver results quickly to anxious families.

Jun 3, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

The developmental origins of culture

New research investigates how our increasingly global community transmits skills and behaviors across generations. How do children divine strategies to understand and adopt social practices, beliefs, and values from their societies?

Jun 2, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How the brain makes — and breaks — a habit

Neuroscience is identifying brain chemicals and neural paths that help us switch from habitual behavior into deliberate decision making.

Jun 1, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Money really does matter in relationships

Money has a significant impact on romantic relationships, finds a new study from China. Our romantic choices are not just based on feelings and emotions, but how rich we feel compared to others.

May 31, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Executive power — developes from the nursery

A baby's cry not only commands our attention, it rattles our executive function — the exact cognitive thinking we use to make everyday decisions, according to a new University of Toronto study.

May 30, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Can lifespan be extended by point of view?

Tricking C. elegans into a state of calorie restriction can extend the worm's lifespan by 50 percent — which suggests such diet "tricks" might work for humans too.

May 27, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Mitochondrial DNA therapy still imperfect
Mitochondrial replacement therapy is a procedure showing promise for preventing inheritance of mitochondrial diseases. However, small amounts of damanaged mtDNA — mitochondrial DNA — are now found to hitch a ride with the transferred nucleus, and recreate mtDNA errors in the baby.

May 26, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Eating fruit prenatally boosts babies' cognition

A University of Alberta, Canada, study discovers a previously unknown benefit to pregnant moms and their babies — increasing the amount of fruit in moms' diet increases baby's cognitive abilities.

May 25, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

BPA in pregnancy can put baby on course to obesity

Prenatal exposure to Bisphenol A (BPA), a common chemical used in plastic water bottles and canned food, is associated with obesity in children at age 7. Ninetyfour percent of pregnant women studied had detectable levels of BPA, a chemical also used in paper shopping receipts.

May 24, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Genes for nose shape identified

Genes that drive the shape of human noses have been identified by a University College of London (UCL) study. These four genes affect the width and 'pointiness' of noses which vary greatly between different populations.

May 23, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Neurons must wriggle to reach their final destination

As our brain develops, microtubules give nerve cells a boost along their way. With attachment help from motor proteins, microtubules send neurons from their birthplace to make a trip towards their final locations. Once there, they pop out axons and dendrites to receive and send sensory signals.

May 20, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Atlas of Human Malformation Syndromes being created

A photographic resource is being made which will help diagnosis of genomic diseases in patients around the world.

May 19, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Fathers' age and lifestyle linked to birth defects

A growing body of research reveals an association between a father's age and alcohol use, and birth defects in his children. Georgetown University Medical Center researchers believe these epigenetic alterations can potentially affect multiple generations.

May 18, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

A safe way to deliver drugs to the placenta

For the first time, researchers have devised a way to deliver drugs via a pregnant woman's placenta without harming her fetus. This development could help prevent some premature births and treat conditions such as pre-eclampsia.

May 17, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Zika causes neural stem cells to self-destruct
A new study reveals human neural stem cells infected with the Zika virus trigger an innate immune response that leads to cell death. The work is adding to the growing number of studies using brain organoids — made from reprogrammed human embryonic stem cells — to understand how the Zika virus leads to microcephaly.

May 16, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Scientists map brain to decode inner thoughts

Neuroimaging reveals detailed word maps criss-cross the human cerebral cortex, mapping our encounters and "sticking" experiences to verbal cues.

May 13, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

You are what you eat!

Indiana University biologists have mapped genetic pathways in dung beetles to find how maternal nutrition affects developing larva.

May 12, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Twin study finds gut microbiomes run in families
A United Kingdom genome-wide analysis of over 1,000 twins reveals that parts of our microbiome are shaped not only through the spread of external microbes given from parent to child, but through genetic inheritance.

May 11, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Another reason to breastfeed

Breast milk supports immune responses in newborns that help the infant's gut become a healthy home to a mix of necessary bacteria.

May 10, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Breast milk fed preemies show larger brain growth
Preemies fed breast milk developed larger brains by their original due date, than preemies consuming small amounts of breastmilk or none.

May 9, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

An aggregate of protein in nerve cells can cause ALS

People with ALS, can have a genetic mutation causing the protein SOD1 to aggregate in motor neurons of the brain and spinal cord. Research has found that SOD1 injected into mice nerve cells, spreads rapidly and leads to ALS.

May 6, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How did human limbs evolve?

Sharks, skates, and rays are odd. They have appendages growing out of their gill arch — a small cradle of bones that supports their gills. This peculiarity has led to the idea that our own legs and arms, and longer ago the paired fins of fish, evolved from transforming gill arches in very early fish.

May 5, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Asynchronous waves key to embryo development
Researchers find wave like timing in stages of cell division act like a switch to regulate formation of the spine.

May 4, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

A cell's 'fuel gauge' promotes healthy development
Salk Institute scientists have found how a cellular "fuel gauge", responsible for monitoring and managing cell energy, has another unexpected role. Without it, cells won't know when to "clean up" or how to recycle cell waste — a forerunner to diabetes and cancer.

May 3, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Safe, inexpensive chemical reverses progeria

A new finding could lead to treatments for rare genetic illness and normal aging. New work from the University of Maryland suggests that a common, inexpensive and safe chemical called methylene blue could be used to treat progeria — and possibly symptoms of normal aging as well.

May 2, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Confused cell signals lead to genetic disorders

The scientific and medical community is working to understand how subtle changes in the LMNA gene cause so many genetic disorders of the nerve, heart and muscles, as well as premature aging.

Apr 29, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Experimental drug cancels affect of Fragile X gene

Study of the most common genetic intellectual disability, Fragile X, has found an experimental drug can reverse — in mice — damage from the gene mutation causing the defect.

Apr 28, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Preschool nurturing boosts child's brain growth

Mothers' loving support is linked to robust growth of brain area involved in learning, memory, and stress response.

Apr 27, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Too much 'noise' can affect brain development

Biologists have determined that uncontrolled fluctuations (or "noise) in the derivative of vitamin A , Retinoic acid (RA), can disrupt brain development.


Apr 26, 2016
-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Human patterns follow the same cues as bacteria

Researchers believe the same chemical signals control pattern formation in bacteria and animals. Genetically modified bacteria help explain how all developing animals keep body parts and organs in relative proportion as every other member of its species.

Apr 25, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

The unique biology of human breast milk
Humans may have the most complex breast milk of all mammals. Milk from a human mother contains more than 200 different sugar molecules, way above the average 30-50 found in mouse or cow milk.

Apr 22, 2016------
News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Clues to how cells repair broken DNA
Our genetic material is stored in the nucleus of each of our cells — protected from constant environmental and metabolic assault. But over a life-time, DNA will suffer damage. Although cells have a host of ways to deal with injury, sometimes things go wrong.

Apr 21, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

First protein crystal structure corrects wrong theory
Reb1 protein binds to DNA sequences, in one instance to control how DNA is transcribed into RNA; in the other, how DNA is replicated before cell division. This is the first time researchers were able to see the crystal form of Reb1 and find that it didn't perform as expected.

Apr 20, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Deletions on chromosome 22, one cause of autism?
Genomic research has found a portion of chromosome 22 is missing in some autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and may be associated with many other neuropsychiatric disorders.

Apr 19, 2016------
News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Microvesicles for brain radiation recovery?
Stem cells show promise for treating brain regions damaged by cancer radiation treatment. Now, research has found microscopic vesicles give similar benefit without some stem cell associated risks.

Apr 18, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

New type of cell death may help neurons regenerate
A new type of cell death found in C elegans mimics cell death seen in human neurons, and may lead to regenerative therapies for human neuron injury.

Apr 15, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Single-cell embryos can be chimeras
Researchers have found errors in single cell embryos which can lead to entire sets of maternal and paternal chromosomes being unevenly distributed — making them chimeras.

Apr 14, 2016------
News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Trophoblast cells unlikely entry point for Zika
One theory — that Zika virus enters the developing fetus by passing through the trophoblasts, a layer of placental cells that surround and nurture the fetus — is disproved. But configuring a new mouse model for the disease reveals that type-I interferon resists Zika.

Apr 13, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Gene found in cleft palate defect

Experts feel this discovery will help development of medical approaches to prevent the condition.

Apr 12, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

An overfed fetus can become an overweight teen
High levels of certain blood markers in your baby's umbilical cord indicate if your baby has more fat than normal — and if so, suggest that your baby will continue gaining more fat into late childhood and adolescence.

Apr 11, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Three generations affected by one DDT exposure

DDT (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane) a weed killer long recognized as a health threat to the human endocrine system — banned in 1972 — is still carried in third and sometimes fourth generation exposed descendants.

Apr 8, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How early female human embryo controls X
There are considerable differences in embryo development between humans and mice, the most commonly used animal model. Research reveals human X chromosome genes are regulated differently.

Apr 7, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Abnormalities in early embryos may self correct

Abnormal cells in the early embryo are not necessarily a sign the baby will be born with a birth defect, suggests new research in mice from the University of Cambridge.

Apr 6, 2016
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News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How to prevent asthma in your newborn?
The best way to reduce a child's chances of developing asthma might be to make sure mom has enough vitamin D during her second trimester.

Apr 5, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Protein on neural stem cell is hijacked by Zika virus
Zika is attracted to human neural stem cells, perhaps because it can hijack a protein found on the surface of those cells and use it to enter the cell.

Apr 4, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Fragile X in mice responds to experimental drug
Fragile X Syndrome (FXS) is an inherited cause of intellectual disability, especially in boys. Cognitive impairment in neuro-developmental disorders like FXS is thought to be due to changes in the brain which alter synaptic connections.

Apr 1, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Born to run?

A new study suggests love of exercise starts in the womb. Baylor College of Medicine research has found that female mice that voluntarily exercise during pregnancy, have pups more physically active as adults.

Mar 31, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Unraveling stem cells

Neuroscientists document the first steps in the process of a stem cell transforming into a different cell type.

Mar 30, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Rewrite the text books!
We know alot about how embryos develop, but how they implant into the uterus - has remained a mystery. Now, scientists from Cambridge have discovered a way to study and film this 'black box' of development.

Mar 29, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Fetal or placental cells?
Genetic 'signatures' of early-stage embryos confirm development begins as early as the second day after conception, when we are a mere four cells. According to new research, even though appearing to be identical, two day-old embryo cells have subtle but important differences.

Mar 28, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Precision medicine targets Lupus

Precision medicine is developing as a new field to deliver highly personalized health care. In order to proceed, it must understand how individual genes, environment and lifestyle impact any disease that may affect a patient.

Mar 25, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Cell 'rejuvenation' relies on telomeres

Scientists have discovered the protein Zscan4, once believed to affect stem cell pluripotency, is actually a cell repair mechanism triggered by cell division.

Mar 24, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

PKU effect on brain more extensive than thought
The "heel stick" test is given at birth to every infant in the USA in order to detect Phenylketonuria (PKU). One in 10,000 children are found to have PKU, which is then treated through a restricted diet. Its rarity and relative ease of treatment has lead PKU to seldom be studied since the late 1960s.

Mar 23, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

A possible treatment for autism-like symptoms

The anti-anxiety drug clonazepam reduces autistic behaviors in mice with Jacobsen syndrome. About half of children born with Jacobsen, a rare inherited disorder, experience social and behavioral issues found in autism spectrum disorders.

Mar 22, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Complex learning dismantles barriers in the brain
By learning a complex task over an extended period of time, each of us has the power to break down barriers in our brains once thought to be permanent.

Mar 21, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Can we turn off Alzheimer's disease?

Russian scientists have found a 'trigger' to Alzheimer's. By figuring out the steps involved in it's development, they may possibly have determined the trigger event beginning the conversion of normal proteins into the plaques of Alzheimer's.

Mar 18, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

A new kind of stem cell?
Scientists at Michigan State University have discovered properties in stem cell "garbage" that may advance regenerative medicine and ways to study birth defects.

Mar 17, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Genes can cause neurological diseases

Spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) is a genetic disease that causes wasting away of the cerebellum — the portion of our brain responsible for controlling voluntary muscle movement, like walking, speaking, even the direction our eyes move.

Mar 16, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Brown fat in adults follows circadian rhythm
A baby's brown fat is known to protect it from cold temperatures. Now research has discovered brown fat in some adults also follows our circadian rhythm and may offer protection from cold and from diabetes.

Mar 15, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Mom's bacterial infection can change fetal brain

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital discovers how pieces of bacteria cross the placenta and alter fetal brain anatomy affecting cognitive function after birth.

Mar 14, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Zika virus breakthrough
Florida State University research has found that the Zika virus creates birth defects by specifically targeting and stunting the growth of developing brain cells.

Mar 11, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Lack of stem cells causes recurring miscarriages

Scientists at the University of Warwick have discovered that a lack of stem cells in the womb lining is causing thousands of women to suffer from recurrent miscarriages.

Mar 10, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

A first: earliest stages of human stem cell lines

Scientists in the United Kingdom show it is possible to create so-called 'naïve' pluripotent stem cells from a human embryo. 'Naïve' pluripotent stem cells are the most flexible stem cells, and can develop into all human tissue except the placenta.

Mar 9, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

One microRNA may affect many neuro disorders

Only discovered in the 1990s, microRNAs are short molecules working within virtually all of our cells. New research now identifies one with strong links to a number of neuropsychiatric disorders, including autism.

Mar 8, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Common gene links obesity to diabetes

The P53 tumor suppressor gene helps every bit of our general metabolism work. A new study reveals how it may have come about in our early ancestors — and how when mutated, it turns into cancer.

Mar 7, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Perception of constant stress is passed on...
For decades science has shown environmental stress experienced in one generation induces change in the biochemistry affecting the next generation. But how ecological conditions stimulate such responses — with differing results in multiple species — is perplexing.

Mar 4, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Snail shells help solve origins of body symmetry

An international team has found the gene that determines whether a snail shell will twist clockwise or counter-clockwise. This same gene may affect our own body symmetry.

Mar 3, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Trimmer snips jumping genes

A Pac-Man-like enzyme called "Trimmer," protects sperm and eggs from genetic rewriting by our "jumping genes."

Mar 2, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Mom's high alcohol level disrupts neonatal brain

Slow-wave sleep — or deep sleep which converts daily events into permanent memories — is fragmented in adults exposed to high levels of alcohol in the womb.

Mar 1, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Amino acids help kids overcome fetal malnutrition

Inadequate essential Amino Acids lead to stunted growth in millions. Worldwide, an estimated 25 percent of children under age 5 suffer from stunted growth and development.

Feb 29, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Zika virus linked to stillbirth, loss of brain tissue

In January came the first case associating Zika virus to damage outside the central nervous system. An infected Brazilian woman gave birth to a stillborn baby with signs of severe tissue swelling and central nervous system defects causing near total brain loss.

Feb 26, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How to regenerate peripheral nerves

Controlling the timing of immune response to nerve damage may be key to promoting nerve cell repair.

Feb 25, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How the nervous system trims its branches
As tiny embryos, we start out with a lot more neuronal material than we actually need. During development, our body drastically prunes excess by cutting branches from nerves — axons — and sometimes entire neurons.

Feb 24, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Teaching stem cells to build muscle

New research shows young muscle stem cells can "teach" adult muscle cells to regenerate. Scientists have found a key to enhancing repair of damaged muscle.

Feb 23, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

'Pump' mechanism splits DNA for copying by RNA

High-resolution images offer new insight into the structure of the replisome, a molecular protein machine that unwinds, splits, and copies double-stranded DNA.

Feb 22, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Stressed dads give offspring high blood sugar
Mouse fathers under psychological stress were more likely to have offspring with high blood sugar than unstressed dads.

Feb 19, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Cell division errors: infertility, disorders and cancers
New insight into faulty cell formation helps us understand why congenital disorders such as Down's syndrome and perhaps infertility occur.

Feb 18, 2016
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Copper key to brain cell development
Chemical change spurs the rapid transport of copper. Researchers at Johns Hopkins used a precision sensor in a chicken embryo and found dramatic differences between the use of copper in developing and fully mature neurons.

Feb 17, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Bioelectric signals influence facial symmetry

A rare genetic disorder may also shed light on fetal alcohol syndrome and other fetal conditions of facial symmetry.

Feb 16, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Potential to treat hypertrophic cardiomyopathy
More than 15 years ago, researchers discovered the precise malfunction of a specific protein in the heart that leads to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), a common culprit in the sudden death of young athletes.

Feb 15, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Fluorescent proteins light up living cells
Tracing proteins in cells is like looking for a needle in a haystack. But, in order to locate such proteins and decipher their function in living cells, researchers can now label them with fluorescent molecules.

Feb 12, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Tuning the volume on gene expression

Research finds genes can be turned on and off, or finely adjusted as if controlled by a volume control knob.

Feb 11, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Linking fetal to adult brain disorders

Using mice as their model animal, scientists have outlined the possible mechanics behind some common neurodevelopment disorders.

Feb 10, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

A quick, simple way to generate neural crest cells
Research led by the School of Medicine at the University of California, Riverside (UC Riverside) provides a quick, simple and trackable way to generate neural crest cells.

Feb 9, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

New drug target for Rett syndrome

Researchers have identified a faulty neural pathway that can be corrected in mice to releave symptoms of Rett syndrome.

Feb 8, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

RNA quick — Protein slow

A team of scientists has uncovered intricate signaling as it applies to making RNA and proteins. Both occur almost at the same moment, but at two unique frequencies.

Feb 5, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Mitochondria trigger cell aging

Our cell batteries also trigger our aging! An international team of scientists has for the first time shown that mitochondria, the batteries of the cells, are essential for ageing.

Feb 4, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How to precisely regulate RNA polymerase?

Scientists have developed a way to analyze and modify phosphorylation sites on the RNA polymerase II enzyme, which is responsible for copying and expressing (turning on) genes.

Feb 3, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

New app helps doctors predict preterm birth

A new app called QUiPP can help doctors better identify women at risk of giving premature birth. Developed at King's College London, the app was tested in two studies of high-risk women monitored at ante-natal clinics.

Feb 2, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Found - protein that turns off biological clock

A protein associated with many kinds of cancer cells, can suppress the circadian clock running every cell's 24 hour cycle. This result has implications not only for cancer treatment, but for re-working the clock itself.

Feb 1, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Virus in pregnancy causes autism-like behavior

A new study in pregnant mice suggests that blocking immune reaction to a virus, can restore normal brain structures in mice pups that would otherwise be damaged by a mother's inflammatory response.

Jan 29, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

A gene that allows for a new species?
Between different species, each with their own specific number of chromosomes, any offspring will be infertile or unable to survive. However, scientists were able to inter-breed two species of fruit flies by knocking out one gene — "gfzf."

Jan 28, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

3 Autism-linked molecules wire up neurons

New research from Duke University reveals how three proteins work together to wire up a specific area of the brain responsible for processing sensory input.

Jan 27, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Donor's genome impacts iPS cell outcomes
Induced pluripotent stem cells [iPS cells] made from different body cells are equally capable of being reprogrammed — no matter what organ cells they originated from. But, the genotype of a donor does affect their differentiation behavior, according to a recent study from Finland.

Jan 26, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

What you eat can influence how you sleep
A new study suggests that your daily intake of fiber, saturated fat and sugar may impact your quality of sleep.

Jan 25, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Brain receptor regulates fat burning in cells
Decreasing levels of the neurotrophin p75 receptor prevented obesity and metabolic disease in mice who were fed a high-fat diet.

Jan 22, 2016
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Diverse gut microbes increase infection resistance
Spending time in close contact with others often means risking catching germs and getting sick. But being sociable can also transmit 'good' microbes, finds a study in chimpanzees.

Jan 21, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Zika virus, linked to birth defects, is spreading
The Zika virus, possibly linked to serious birth defects in Brazil, has the potential to spread within the Americas, including parts of the United States, according to an international team of researchers tracking the spread of infectious diseases.

Jan 20, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Eat fish in pregnancy to improve baby's brain

Researchers at Tohoku University's School of Medicine have found why eating fish during pregnancy correlates with the health of the baby's brain.

Jan 19, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Turning epigenetic marks OFF!

Epigenetics is defined as heritable changes made to a gene. But these changes are not in the DNA sequence itself — they come from methyl groups added to the DNA strand. Now, research has identified 2 proteins that can remove methylation marks from DNA.

Jan 18, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Cell signal strength turns on early stem cells
Stem cells work like handymen, repairing damaged tissues and renewing other tissues such as our skin. Scientists understand more about how stem cells work in adults, but less about how they work in an embryo.

Jan 15, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Slow stem cell division causes small brain?
Duke University research has followed the development of microcephaly, which produces a much smaller brain than normal, to find stem cells were simply moving too slowly when constructing neurons in affected brains.

Jan 14, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Healing muscular dystrophy with CRISPR
The red-hot genome editing tool known as CRISPR has scored another achievement — researchers have used it to treat a severe form of muscular dystrophy in mice.

Jan 13, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Of protein kinases, embryos and cancer
Protein kinases play an important role in how embryos develop. They also are becoming targets for cancer research.

Jan 12, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Can having more children slow down aging?
A study by Simon Fraser University suggests that the number of children born to a woman influences the rate at which her body ages — for the better!

Jan 11, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Uterine microorganisms may set stage for disease

Experts review the potential influence of a developing infant's microbiome on its' own potential birth defects and childhood diseases.

Jan 8, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

A mathematical model for animal stripes
The back of a tiger could have been a blank canvas. Instead, nature painted the big cat with parallel stripes, evenly spaced and perpendicular to its' spine. Scientists don't know exactly how stripes develop, but mathematicians since the 1950s have been modeling possible scenarios.

Jan 7, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Physics attempts to explain why stem cells move

Research has shed light on the complex interactions of stem cells and molecular diffusion in brain tissue. The calculations may explain phenomena such as stem cell differentiation and even the formation of the cortex of our brain.

Jan 6, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Epigenetic change leads to cerebellum circuitry
Before birth and throughout childhood connections form and continue to form between neurons in the brain. To date, scientists have a pretty good understanding of how these circuits functionally get set up. But, they don't know how much is the result of our DNA template — and how much is epigenetic.

Jan 5, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Id tags define developing neural circuits
The human brain is composed of circuits made up of neurons, cells specialized to transmit information via electrochemical signals. Like the circuits in a computer, these neuronal circuits must connect in very unique ways in order to function. But with billions in a single human brain, how does a neuron make the right connection with the right cell?

Jan 4, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Mechanism for how organs branch found
The lung is as much a natural work of art as a functioning organ with its twisting bronchial branches and delicate curls. Now Princeton researchers have observed this artistry unfold. While growing mouse embryo lungs, they arrived at a surprising conclusion about forces to help shape lungs.

Jan 1, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How to multiply teeth!

Teeth are a major target of regenerative medicine. Research has now found a way to — literally — multiply their number. Testing in mice, researchers extracted teeth germs — groups of cells formed early in development that grow into teeth, split them in two, and then re-implant them into mice jaws to develop into fully functional teeth.

Dec 31, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Increasing IVF cycles increases chances for live birth
In vitro fertilization (IVF) is often limited to 3 or 4 treatment cycles. However, new research shows extending the number of IVF cycles up to nine, birth rate increased. In fact, 65 percent of women achieved a live birth by the sixth cycle.

Dec 30, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Make impulsive choices? Blame mom and dad's genes
'Delay discounting' is the tendency to take a smaller, immediate reward instead of a larger reward to be delivered in the future. This impulse is strongly influenced by our inherited genetic makeup.

Dec 29, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Multilingual babies use more cognitive control
You may believe that you have forgotten the Chinese you spoke as a child, but your brain hasn't. Moreover, that "forgotten" first language may well influence what goes on in your brain when you speak English or French today. New research demonstrates our brain's plasticity and ability to adapt to new language environments.

Dec 28, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How genes link heart and neurodevelopmental disease
Harvard medical research shows children with both congenital heart disease and neurodevelopmental delays share genetic mutations.

Dec 25, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Messenger RNA may fine tune protein production
Long thought of as a simple link between DNA and protein, new research at The Rockefeller University suggests messenger RNA is up to something unexpected.

Dec 24, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

A major step toward growing kidneys
Cells that produce blood vessels have been identified, paving the way for tissue engineering.

Dec 23, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Sperm pass on information about dad's weight
Turns out dads are also eating for two. A study reveals that a man's weight changes the heritable information in his sperm — and passes that trait on to his children.

Dec 22, 2015
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Sperm 'see' it hot
In their arduous journey to the egg, sperm 'feel' the heat of the fallopian tube and 'taste' the chemical signals of the egg. Now, a new study shows sperm actually use sensors — mainly associated with the visual system — to detect eggs.

Dec 21, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Human stem cells likely safe for use in regenerative medicine
By transferring human pluripotent stem cells into the gastrula stage of mouse embryos and their subsequent safe incorporation and development into normal mice, Cambridge researchers have now performed the strongest experiment to date supporting stem cells safe use. A breakthrough discovery for regenerative medicine.

Dec 18, 2015
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News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Turning point in a lifetime
A new microscope can record the first days of a mouse embryo from fertilization until implantation in it's mother's womb.

Dec 17, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Antidepressants increase autism risk 87 percent
Using antidepressants during pregnancy greatly increases the risk of autism, a ground breaking study has found after looking at outcomes of 145,456 pregnancies where the moms used antidepressants.

Dec 16, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

A subtle dance of atoms influences enzymes
Infinitesimal fluctuations occurring in milli- even nano-seconds within the three-dimensional structure of enzymes, may be one of the keys to explaining protein interactions.

Dec 15, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Molecule stops brain stem cells from becoming tumors
Within natural aging of neural stem cells in the fruit fly, science has uncovered a molecular change. They have found a protein which is expressed (turned on) that blocks tumor formation.

Dec 14, 2015
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News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Sleep may strengthen our immune system
For more than a century, science has known sleep supports retention of memories, facts and events. Later it was shown deep sleep is important for transforming fragile, recent memories into stable, long-term ones. Now, research proposes deep sleep may strengthen our immune system by retaining our memory of pathogens.

Dec 11, 2015
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News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Neuroscientists now can read the mind of a fly
A new technique could yield knowledge useful to understanding the human brain. Northwestern University neuroscientists can read the mind of a fly after developing a clever tool that lights up active neurons during a behavior or sensory experience, such as smelling a banana.

Dec 10, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

CBD in cannabis shows promise for severe epilepsy

Around the globe there is high interest in using CannaBiDiol (CBD), a type of cannabinoid, for the treatment of epilepsy, especially in children with treatment-resistant forms of the disorder such as Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome (LGS) and Dravet Syndrome (DS). Significant seizure reduction has been seen in studies using CBD in combination with AEDs.

Dec 9, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Four studies explore memory decline with epilepsy

Four studies presented at the American Epilepsy Society's (AES) 69th Annual Meeting uncover biological factors that may indirectly cause memory decline in people with epilepsy. Particularly in patients with seizures affecting their temporal lobe.

Dec 8, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

'App' may improve daily function in schizophrenia
A 'brain training' iPad game developed and tested through research at the University of Cambridge, UK, may improve the memory of patients with schizophrenia.

Dec 7, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Hippocampus essential in all aspects of recognition memory

The hippocampus plays a major role in memory and spatial navigation. It is essential to our recognizing previous events, objects, and people - which is known as recognition memory.

Dec 4, 2015
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News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Working memory is more complex than we thought
Rhythmic interaction of brain waves in the hippocampus are key to our memories. Two brain states must vibrate rhythmically in order for information to be retained.

Dec 3, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

The silence of the genes
Within each of our cells, we have two copies of each gene we inherited, one from our mother and one from our father. If one of those two genes is 'turned off', or silenced, it can affect health.

Dec 2, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Cells 'reach out' to build trachea
Mipp1 protein helps cells sprout 'fingers' in order to grab nearby cells and pull them into production of new tissue structures in the fruit fly. Do some of our cells do the same?

Dec 1, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How cells in the developing ear 'practice' hearing
Before the fluid of the middle ear drains and sound waves penetrate those cells for the first time, inner ear cells of newborn rodents practice for their big debut.

Nov 30, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Correcting gene error restores brain function

Gene duplHow cells in the developing ear 'practice' hearing Before the fluid of the middle ear drains and sound waves penetrate those cells for the first time, inner ear cells of newborn rodents practice for their big debut.ications are a common cause of intellectual disabilities. Correcting gene duplication by targeting excess duplicated genes in critical brain regions, may have potential for treatment of intellectual disorders.

Nov 27, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Babies have logical reasoning before age one

Deductive problem solving was always thought to be beyond the reach of human infants. But now we find babies are capable of problem solving as early as 10 months of age.

Nov 26, 2015-----
News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How cells begin to shape a living being
You were once a hollow ball of cells. Sculpting that hollow ball into an organism with layer upon layer of organs, sinew, tendons, muscle and brain, first starts when a simple ball of cells folds inwards. But why do cells start to fold into themselves? Is all cell movement based on DNA programming, or does the shape of surrounding cells also have an affect?

Nov 25, 2015
-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Target gene identified to combat muscular dystrophy
Research from Brazil and the United States suggests inducing overexpression of the gene — Jagged1 — can prevent development of muscular dystrophy.

Nov 24, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Turning taste on and off in the brain
A new study proves that sense of taste is hardwired in the brain, independent of learning or experience.

Nov 23, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

A master switch for brain development?
Scientists at the Institute of Molecular Biology in Mainz have unraveled a regulatory mechanism which explains how a single gene can drive the formation of brain cells.

Nov 20, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Targeting Alzheimer's disease through anti-aging
Salk Institute researchers have found an experimental drug aimed at Alzheimer's which ends up having anti-aging effects in mice.

Nov 19, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Repairing neurons with light
The nervous system is built to last the lifetime of an animal. But disease and trauma can overpower neurons to fail in maintaining function or even self repair. However, a team of German scientists have succeeded in stimulating an injured neural circuit in zebrafish to repair itself — using light waves.

Nov 18, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Our brain, more than chimp's, influenced by epigenetics
Human brains exhibit more of a tendency to be modeled by epigenetic influences than chimpanzee brains. This may account for part of our evolutionary differences.

Nov 17, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Do metabolites regulate embryo development?
Changes in cellular metabolites have been shown to regulate embryonic stem cell development at the earliest stages of life. Metabolites are simple compounds generated during life-sustaining chemical activities in cells.

Nov 16, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Working on toddler's memory can help in high school
Preschoolers working memory can forecast teenage dropout risk. Individual differences in executive function, play an important role in predicting later drop out risk. Executive functions contribute to academic success, engagement and to achieving goals.

Nov 13, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Batten disease may benefit from gene therapy
Batten disease causes problems with a cell's ability to breakdown specific molecules. In a study with dogs, scientists found a new way to deliver replacement genes effective at slowing the development of this rare and fatal childhood neurological disorder.

Nov 12, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Prenatal blood test increases accuracy - reduces risk
A simple, accurate and low risk blood test can now detect the fetal blood group, sex, and genetic conditions of an unborn baby more accurately and with less risk than ever before.

Nov 11, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

A way to target Neuroblastoma
Scientists have identified a molecular 'feedback loop' critically driving neuroblastoma, a children's cancer of the nervous system triggered by embryonic nerve cells.

Nov 10, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

What happens if DNA cannot fit into the nucleus?
Packaging approximately 1.8 meters of DNA into something as small as a cell nucleus is no easy feat. But what about unpacking it again in order to access it's genes? All this activity requires organization. DNA is dynamic information that requires storage, access and constant maintenance.

Nov 9, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Why some genes are frequently read more than others
DNA in our cells is folded into millions of small necklaces — like beads on molecular strings — called nucleosomes. These "necklaces" allow our two-meter strings of DNA to fit into a nucleus only about 0.01 mm in diameter. However, these "necklaces" actually make DNA 'unreadable'. Nucleosomes need to be temporarily "unwound" to allow genes to be copied - read - before a gene can produce a protein.

Nov 6, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

High stress in pregnancy may decrease baby's survival
Pups born to female mongooses that experience elevated stress hormones, are much less likely to survive. Researchers studying banded mongooses in Uganda discovered that pups born to females experiencing elevated stress during late stages in pregnancy, were less likely to survive their first month.

Nov 5, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

More precise due dates for average pregnancy?
To the frustration of busy pregnant women everywhere, the estimate of when she'll actually give birth can be off by as much as two to three weeks — early or late. Now, a routine screening could help narrow the estimated date of delivery to seven days from the time of the test.

Nov 4, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Can amniotic fluid predict time of delivery?
Analyzing gene expression of a pregnant woman's amniotic fluid could give doctors an important tool for deciding when it is safe to deliver premature babies.

Nov 3, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Singing calms baby longer than talking
New study shows that babies become distressed twice as fast when listening to speech compared to song.

Nov 2, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Common preservative may increase breast cancer
Estrogen-mimicing chemicals called parabens commonly found in an array of personal care products, may be more dangerous at lower doses than previously thought. Parabens are preservatives used in shampoos, commercial moisturizers, shaving gels, personal lubricants, topical pharmaceuticals, spray tanning solution, makeup and toothpaste. They are also used as food additives.

Oct 30, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Antibiotics in children promote weight gain
Kids who receive antibiotics throughout the course of their childhoods gain weight significantly faster than those who do not, according to new research. A study suggests repeated antibiotic use leads to a lifelong higher Body Mass Index.

Oct 29, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Mom's preeclampsia increases risk to baby's heart
Pregnant women with preeclampsia have a higher risk of delivering an infant with a congenital heart defect.

Oct 28, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

The mighty Panoramix — defender of genomes!
A protein named for a French comic book hero is no joke. It guides cell machinery to silence (turn off) genes and fix havoc caused by organisms that are like bacteria and called transposons.

Oct 27, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Splitting embryo to force twins for IVF - not advised
Human twin embryos created in the laboratory, by splitting single embryos into two, is a common method known as blastomere biopsy. But a new study led by King's College London, suggests this split may be interferring with a 'developmental clock' critical to early human development. Therefore, unsuitable for either research or IVF.

Oct 26, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Dad's microRNA affects his baby's brain
Scientists observe more and more often that DNA is not the only way a parent passes on traits to its children. Now, University of Pennsylvania researchers have found that stress changes a mouse's sperm in a way that affects his own pups' response to stress.

Oct 23, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How RNA regulates sex-linked disorders
Boys have an X and a Y chromosome inside each cell. Girls have two X's. That small difference explains why boys are more at risk for disorders, from autism to hemophilia, linked to gene defects on their one X chromosome. We may now know how parts of that X can be silenced — to better treat X-linked diseases.

Oct 22, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Htt protein controls Rab direction on neurons
We've known for years that the Huntingtin protein (Htt) is responsible for a neurodegenerative disorder that diminishes a person's mental and physical capabilities. Now there is new research that helps explain the root causes of Huntington's disease.

Oct 21, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Regrow a tooth? Fish, yes! Humans, maybe ...
When a Lake Malawi cichlid loses a tooth, a new one drops neatly into place as a replacement. Why can't we humans regrow our teeth lost to injury or disease?

Oct 20, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Sleep as reward boosts learning
A new study suggests that receiving rewards as you learn can help cement new facts and skills to memory — but especially when combined with a daytime nap.

Oct 19, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Extra male brain cells remember sex more than food
A pair of neurons have been found in the brain of male nematode worms that allows them to remember and seek sex at the expense of seeking food.

Oct 16, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Generating placental cells from skin cells
Regenerative medicine is new and expanding and aims to replace lost or damaged cells, tissues and organs in the human body. Now, placental cells may be added to the list.

Oct 15, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

The father effect
How do environmental challenges get transmitted from a father to his grandchildren? If you have diabetes, or cancer or even heart problems, you might need to blame your dad's behavior or environment. Or even your grandfather's.

Oct 14, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Chromosome errors may explain brain birth defects
Balanced Chromosomal Abnormalities — or BCAs — are structural changes to the human genome. They may account for a large portion of birth defects affecting how our brain develops and functions.

Oct 13, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Gene links chromosome errors to early pregnancy loss
Researchers have identified a common gene variant strongly associated with chromosome gain and loss in early human embryos. These errors in cell division, are almost always fatal to an embryo, add to early pregnancy loss and IVF failure.

Oct 12, 2015-----
News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

A gene that prevents Parkinson's disease and dementia
More than half of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients develop progressive disease showing signs of dementia similar to Alzheimer's. However, a research team at University of Copenhagen, Denmark, has discovered that non-inheritable PD may be due to changes in the immune regulating gene Interferon-beta (IFNβ).

Oct 9, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Ovarian transplants appear to be safe and effective
Women who have ovarian tissue removed, stored and then transplanted back to them at a later date have a good chance of successfully becoming pregnant, according to a review of the largest series of ovarian transplants performed worldwide.

Oct 8, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Restoring vision using pluripotent stem cells
Researchers succeed in producing photoreceptors from human embryonic stem cells.

Oct 7, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Artificial Intelligence helps predict cancer
Tadpole melanocyte cells reveal that they can be hyperstimulated into a cancerous state. Research with artificial intelligence programming, however, has unraveled the molecular signaling pathway and physiological circuit that converts "instructor cells" - precursor cells to melanocytes - to become those cancerous pigment cells.

Oct 6, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

OB-GYN group urges prevention of chemical exposures
According to the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO), dramatic increases in exposure to toxic chemicals in the last four decades threaten human reproduction and health. This is the first global reproductive health group to take a stand against toxic chemicals.

Oct 5, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Global warming lowers birth weights
A University of Utah study finds that along with melting glaciers and increasing wildfires, low birth weight babies are also a consequence of global climate change.

Oct 2, 2015
-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Kids being kids — make better parents
Mothers who took on burdensome caregiving roles as children — and weren't allowed to just "be kids" — tend to be less sensitive to their own children's needs, finds new research from Michigan State University.

Oct 1, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

A hormone to break the obesity cycle?
While obesity rates for pregnant women continue to climb, scientists have discovered they can increase a specific hormone during pregnancy and reduce, or possibly, eliminate the chances the babies born will become obese as well.

Sep 30, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Pass the salt — How pregnancy drives food cravings
Researchers in Lisbon, Portugal have discovered fruit flies share our craving for salt during pregnancy.

Sep 29, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Mom's protein deficiency affects boys more
A study has uncovered the genetic processes that link insufficient protein during pregnancy with problems in muscle development in boy babies.

Sep 28, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Do chemicals make us couch potatoes?
A University of Missouri study has found that when pregnant mice are exposed to environmental chemicals, their daughters have a decreased metabolism expressed as a lack of physical activity conducted later in life.

Sep 26, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Do chemicals make us couch potatoes?
A University of Missouri study has found that when pregnant mice are exposed to environmental chemicals, their daughters have a decreased metabolism expressed as a lack of physical activity conducted later in life.

Sep 25, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

New CRISPR-Cas9 strategy edits genes 2 ways
A team of Harvard and MIT researchers have developed a way to perform genome engineering as well as gene regulation at the same time.

Sep 24, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Depression gene has a silver lining
Some people have a gene which magnifies the psychological impact of life events — for better or for worse.

Sep 23, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Grieving before conception — risk to infant?
An elevated infant death rate may be linked to mourning experienced by women in the months before they become pregnant.

Sep 22, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Decoding cell division
Every high school biology class learns about mitosis, the steps in cell division which end in two daughter cells, each having the same genetic material as the "parent" cell. Now, one particular spindle matrix protein, BuGZ, has been identified for its role in the process.

Sep 21, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Two genes play major role in growth and cancers
Disruptions in the splicing of proteins causes facial, skin, and organ defects in young mice.

Sep 18, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

The grandmother hypothesis
If you are in a special relationship with another person, thank grandma - not just yours, but all grandmothers since humans evolved.

Sep 17, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

The black box at the beginning of life
Kyoto University sheds light on how human germ cells form in the earliest stages of development.

Sep 16, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

A new method to turn genes off and on
Researchers at the University of Helsinki, Finland, have developed a new method to enable activation of genes in a cell. All without changing the genome.

Sep 15, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

New molecule found to prevent preterm birth
A molecule named 101.10, inhibits inflammation-induced uterine contractions. Pre Term births (PTB) are linked to uterine tissue inflammation, which leads to contractions and early labor.

Sep 14, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

What steers evolution? Genes, then nature, then genes..
Natural selection is a race to reproduce, a competition between individuals affecting evolution within a species. Scientists exploring networks that shape individual form and function, now ask: How do genes determine which individuals get to compete, before evolutionary competition even begins?

Sep 11, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

3-D printed organoids - first step to building organs
Scientists have developed a technique to build tiny models of human tissues — called organoids — that turn human cells into a biological equivalent of LEGO bricks. These 'organoids' are useful in cancer research and drug screening.

Sep 10, 2015-----
News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Come here, and be quiet!
Genes are physically held silenced in 'lock-down' within embryonic stem cells — until given the proper signal.

Sep 9, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How neurons branch
For more than a hundred years, people have known that dendrites project off of neurons and receive information from other neurons. As we grow in experience, they grow creating tree-like arbors differing in shape depending on the neuron. Now, a factor has been discovered that helps shape these arbors.

Sep 8, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Childhood Vaccination Reduces Leukemia Risk
Research has discovered how a commonly given vaccine protects against acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common type of childhood cancer.

Sep 7, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Fats help organize spinal cord
Healing spinal cord damage is incredibly difficult. Torn neurons must reconnect with precision, which we cannot make happen - as yet. But, scientists at the RIKEN Brain Science Institute in Japan have discovered that lipids are as needed for the process of guiding axons, as proteins are — a discovery which may improve our attempts.

Sep 4, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

'Brainbow' reveals a surprising visual connection
Neuroscientists know some connections in the brain are pruned during infant growth and neural development. According to the textbooks, function drives new neural growth. But scientists are discovering the textbooks might be wrong.

Sep 3, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Obesity and stillbirth
Obese women are nearly twice as likely as lean women to have stillborn babies. There are several preventable medical reasons why, revealed in an analysis by the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health.

Sep 2, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Arsenic in drinking water links early puberty and obesity
Fetal female mice exposed in the womb to low levels of arsenic through drinking water, began puberty early and became obese as adults, according to scientists from the National Institutes of Health. This is significant as the level of 10 parts per billion in the study is the current standard allowed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

Sep 1, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Do sperm wield tiny harpoons?
Could sperm harpoon the egg to initiate fertilization? That's a possibility raised after finding spiky filaments on the sperm head. The spikes may play a role in sperm and egg fusion.

Aug 31, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Building a safer stem cell
Spanish scientists find a way to generate safer stem cells in the laboratory. Their project represents a major step forward in the possible therapeutic use of stem cells.

Aug 28, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How zebrafish rebuild their amputated fins
Fish have the fascinating ability to fully regenerate amputated organs. Unlike us poor humans. Therefore, Zebrafish are a favorite model for studying the processes behind organ regeneration and potential human application.

Aug 27, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Batting practice in the genome
In the biochemical game of genetics, proteins were seen as either 'spectators' or 'players' in gene regulation. But that idea is changing. Researchers now find spectator proteins are actually at batting practice, gearing up for the big game.

Aug 26, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Algorithm identifies gene movement around the clock
An algorithm gives scientists a new way to identify dynamic patterns in oscillating genes, helping define when genes begin to function during fetal growth.

Aug 25, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

About that Paleo diet, eat some carbs!
Understanding how and why we evolved our large brains is one of the most puzzling issues in human evolution. Widely accepted is that brain size increased with changes in diet including meat and the introduction of cooking.

Aug 24, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Infertility of middle-aged mice can be reversed
We all know our fertility cycle becomes more irregular during menopause. Now it appears our aging circadian clock may someday be reversible.

Aug 21, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Pre-pregnancy factors affect two generations
A woman’s weight at birth, education level and marital status pre-pregnancy can have repercussions for two generations, putting her children and grandchildren at higher risk of low birth weight.

Aug 20, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Engineering a solution to genetic diseases
New study advances scientists' ability to permanently 'edit' faulty genes

Aug 19, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Ultrasound has potential to detect preterm labor
A proof-of-concept study using ultrasound to detect changes in cervical stiffness, can indicate if there is risk for preterm labor. It may ultimately give doctors a new tool for preventing preterm birth.

Aug 18, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

One protein keeps cells both static and moving!
New research reveals the protein E-Cadherin not only makes a cell "sticky," but is also critical for its mobility.

Aug 17, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

What controls our waking up and going to sleep?
A simple 2-cycle mechanism turns our key brain neurons 'off' and 'on' during a 24-hour day.

Aug 14, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How can labor contractions keep growing stronger?
Scientists, for the first time, have identified a mechanism in muscle cells of the uterus that explain how contractions in childbirth grow stronger.

Aug 13, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Resurrecting ancient viruses to improve gene therapy
Researchers at Massachusetts Schepens Eye Research Institute have reconstructed an ancient virus to deliver gene therapy to the liver, muscle, or retina. A technique potentially more potent than currently available therapies.

Aug 12, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Skin stem cells coaxed to become Schwann cells
Scientists use a combination of small molecules to turn cells isolated from human skin into Schwann cells - the specialized cells which support nerves and play a role in nerve repair.

Aug 11, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How a single genetic mutation can cause autism
New research shows the precise cell mechanisms that leads to autism disorder, and an existing drug which might help thousands of people with autism.

Aug 10, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Surprising light on genetic causes for cerebral palsy
Cerebral palsy has historically been considered to be caused by birth asphyxia, stroke or perhaps infections in the developing brain of babies. Now, a new Canadian study has uncovered strong evidence for genetic causes of cerebral palsy.

Aug 7, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Drinking at conception boosts diabetes risk for baby
Babies conceived by women who drink alcohol around the time of conception face dramatically increased risks of type 2 diabetes and obesity in early middle age, a University of Queensland, Australia study has found.

Aug 6, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Altered brain growth in autism spectrum disorder
More than half a century after autism was identified by psychiatrist Leo Kanner in 1943, the exact causes of this brain disorder still remain unclear. Now Scripps research has uncovered how mutations in the gene PTEN, mutated in 20% of autism cases, alters early brain development in mice and contributes to macrocephaly or enlarged head.

Aug 5, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Stem cells one step closer to curing genetic disease
Healthy brain, muscle, eye and heart cells would improve the lives of tens of thousands of people around the world with mitochondrial diseases. Now, researchers at the Salk Institute have gotten one step closer to making such cures a reality: they've turned patient's cells into healthy stem cells, mutation-free, that can then become any cell type.

Aug 4, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Simple flip of a genetic switch begins aging
Scientists have pinpointed the start of aging and discovered it is not a slow series of random events. Two Northwestern University scientists have identified a molecular switch in the transparent roundworm C. elegans, that abruptly begins cell aging just as the animal reaches reproductive maturity.

Aug 3, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Stressed birds stop looking to parents, turn to flock
Zebra finches are highly-social and learn foraging skills from their parents. However, if exposed to stress after hatching, young birds will ignore their parents and look to unrelated adult birds for help and learning instead.

Jul 31, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

'Miniature brains' from skin cells explain autism
A larger head size — or macrocephaly — is seen in some children with severe Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). In a new stem cell study from the Yale School of Medicine, researchers found cerebral cortex cells divided at a faster pace, along with over production of the FOXG1 gene in ASD patients' with large head size. These observations may lead to new drug targets for autism treatment.

Jul 30, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Birth order not meaningful to personality or IQ
A study of 377,000 high school students offers some good news: Yes, first-borns do have higher IQs and consistently different personality traits than those born later in the family. However, the differences are so small they have no practical relevance.

Jul 29, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Genetic roots of scoliosis
Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) — or curvature of the spine — affects tens of millions of children worldwide. Now, scientists have discovered a gene with links to the condition.

Jul 28, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Reverse hearing loss?

Unlike birds and amphibians, mammals can't recover lost hearing. In people, the cells of the inner ear responsible for detecting sound and transmitting those signals to the brain, form during the early weeks of development. And unlike other animals, can't be replaced if lost to illness, injury or aging.

Jul 27, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Mind the gap!
In biology, stability is very important. From body temperature to blood pressure and sugar levels, our body ensures that all of our systems remain within reasonable limits, without damaging extremes.

Jul 24, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Bad genes don't always lead to same outcomes
New research has uncovered how DNA influences the potential severity of any genetic disease. Two people with the same disease-causing gene mutation do not always become ill to the same extent — an end result that has puzzled scientists for decades.

Jul 23, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How is temperature affecting mammal moms?
Temperature change affects reproduction in mammals as well as how they care for their young. With cooler temperatures, hamster moms increase their nursing output, but at warmer temperatures they decrease milk production. With climate change, researchers are hurrying to record how temperature flucturation impacts mammal moms and their babies.

Jul 22, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Sialic acid is key to unlocking brain disorders
Research in mice may help us understand how small changes in the way sialic acid attaches to the surface of a neuron can affect motor skills and learning, or cause hyperactivity.

Jul 21, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Metformin does not reduce baby birthweights
Treating obese pregnant women with a diabetes drug does not stop their babies from being born overweight. Doctors had hoped such treatment would help reduce obesity rates and lower the number of difficult births.

Jul 20, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Binge-eating cavefish share gene mutation with us
Blind cavefish have adapted to annual cycles of starvation and binge-eating perhaps due to mutations in their MC4R gene. This is the same gene that is mutated in certain obese people with insatiable appetites, according to a new study led by Harvard Medical School geneticists.

Jul 17, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Hippo dances to hormones
Although fruit flies don't develop cancer, stem cell researchers have been learning a great deal from them. In particular, from mutant flies with overgrown organs that resemble hippopotamuses.

Jul 16, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How good is your eyesight?
The human eye can accurately distinguish between the most subtle differences in color. Where human vision falls short is in perceiving minuscule detail. Researchers in Finland have now captured that ability in us - using color.

Jul 15, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

CEP63 Gene key to brain development and fertility
Researchers studying the gene CEP63, found mutated in a rare brain disorder called Seckel syndrome, now know why it causes microcephaly, growth defects and in some cases — male infertility.

Jul 14, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Geometry of brain’s surface matches gene heritage
Patterns in sulci and gyri don’t predict intelligence, but may help diagnose disease — as well as reflect an individual's genetic background.

Jul 13, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

'Avandia' to be clinically tested for preeclampsia
Rosiglitazone, a drug sold as Avandia for diabetic use, has been found to stimulate the placenta and halt severe preeclampsia — high blood pressure — during pregnancy.

Jul 10, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Determining the front and back of a cell
A new protein is identified that helps cells determine their polarity and direction. The direction a cell moves in impacts wound healing, cancer metastasis and many other cell outcomes.

Jul 9, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Long-term memory maintained by prion-like proteins
Research has uncovered evidence of a system in the brain that persistently maintains memories for long periods of time. Paradoxically, it works with the same mechanisms that cause mad cow, kuru, and other brain disorders.

Jul 8, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Autism affects neural pathways and brain shape
Scientists have found that mutations that cause autism in children are connected to a neural pathway regulating brain shape during fetal development.

Jul 7, 2015
-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Fine tuning the brain
When newborn babies open their eyes for the first time, they already possess nerve cells specialized in particular stimuli in the visual cortex of their brains - but how are these nerve cells systematically linked with each other?

Jul 6, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

REM sleep critical to young brain development
Medication was found to interfere with REM sleep which locks in skills and experiences. Analysis showed that normal vision did not develop in animals experiencing a REM sleep deficit.

Jul 3, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Brain size/intelligence controlled by a single gene
A gene called Angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1) drives brain size and intelligence in fish according to a new study out of UCL, Stockholm University and University of Helsinki.

Jul 2, 2015-----
News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Stressed moms alter babys' gut and brain
Stress during the first trimester of pregnancy alters the population of microbes living in a woman's vagina. Those changes are passed on to newborns during birth and are associated with differences in their gut microbiome as well as their brain development, according to a new study from the University of Pennsylvania.

Jul 1, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Placenta-on-a-chip
National Institutes of Health (NIH) researchers and their colleagues have developed a "placenta-on-a-chip" to study the inner workings of the human placenta and its role in pregnancy.

Jun 30, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Educate mom, reduce unintended pregnancies
Educating young women about intrauterine devices and contraceptive implants — which are more effective than condoms or the pill — dramatically cut the number of unintended pregnancies among women seeking family planning.

Jun 29, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Picky eaters — a serious problem for some
Eating disorders experts weigh in on Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder — two years after classification as a mental health condition.

Jun 26, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

New Noninvasive and effective Prenatal Testing
Non Invasive Prenatal Diagnosis (NIPD) is a new genetic test to screen for birth defects and inherited disease. Now available only to women with high-risk pregnancies, many experts feel it should become a standard test. It is projected to become standard for use by the National Health Service in the United Kingdom sometime this year.

Jun 25, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Strong working memory can reduce teen sex?
A new study has found that individual differences in working memory can predict early sexual activity and unprotected sex in teenagers.

Jun 24, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Gene mutation triggers lymphoblastic leukemia
Recent research has "major implications" for understanding the genetic basis of several types of cancer, including leukemia.

Jun 23, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Sun's coronal gases may harm our health
Husband and wife scientists have observed an unusual phenomenon. They have revealed a "highly significant" match between solar storms and incidents of human disease: rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and giant cell arteritis (GCA), both autoimmune disorders.

Jun 22, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Cat videos make you 'feel-good' and boost energy!
If you get a warm, fuzzy feeling after watching cute cat videos, the effect may be more profound than you think!

Jun 19, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Humans, we may have a built-in GPS in our nose
Like homing pigeons, humans have a nose for navigation. Our brains are wired to convert smells into spatial information to orient ourselves.

Jun 18, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Low glycemic index diet reduces autism symptoms
Salk researchers find diet recommended for diabetics softens the symptoms of autism in mice.

Jun 17, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Common pesticide linked to ADHD — in boys
A new study links a commonly used household pesticide to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and young teens — but strongest in boys.

Jun 16, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Artificial intelligence regenerates planaria
For the first time, artificial intelligence proves it can do more than just crunch numbers — and shows us the body plan planaria follow to regenerate.

Jun 15, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Egg or sperm? That is the question...
A genetic switch is discovered that determines the fate of germ cells in the ovary of a little fish called the Japanese rice fish or medaka. It turns out that female medaka can produce sperm OR eggs in their ovaries.

Jun 12, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Mutations can spontaneously occur in early embryos
Until now, de novo genetic mutations — gene alterations — found for the first time in one child, were believed to be mainly the result of mutations in a sperm or egg (germline) of one parent and passed on to that child.

Jun 11, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Progeria syndrome truly a disease of aging
In new research, scientists have shown that Progeria or Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS), is a disease comparable to normal aging.

Jun 10, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Infant brains develop faster than we thought
Scientists discover that infant brain development occurs years earlier than previously thought.

Jun 9, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

The Secret to a Longer Life? Be Female
Human supercentenarians share at least one thing in common — over 95 percent are women. Scientists have long observed differences between the sexes when it comes to aging, but there is no clear explanation for why females live longer.

Jun 8, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Motherhood permanently alters your brain
Motherhood permanently alters the brain and its response to hormone therapy later in a woman's life.

Jun 5, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Genes can predict a woman's first birth
Researchers analyzed the genes of thousands of women in the UK and the Netherlands and found the genes accurately predicted in about 15 per cent of women, when they will have their first baby.

Jun 4, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Genetic mutation link to autism might be undone
Scientists at the University at Buffalo have identified the mechanisms behind a genetic mutation that produces certain autistic behaviors in mice, as well as therapeutic strategies to restore normal behaviors.

Jun 3, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Why and how to barcode thousands of cells
When it comes to the tissues in our bodies, which cells do what, is almost always misleading. Scientists know there isn't just one cell type in an organ or any tissue.

Jun 2, 201-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Clues to how human neurovascular unit forms
Crucial functions we depend on, but don't consciously think about — things like heart rate, blood flow, breathing and digestion — are regulated by our neurovascular unit (1) which is made up of blood vessels and smooth muscles. But how they work together to coordinate functions is not yet understood.

Jun 1, 2015
-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Mothers coo while fathers say cool
Research presented at the 169th Acoustical Society of America meeting in Pittsburgh suggests that by avoiding baby talk, men may actually act as a bridge between baby talk and language acquisition for their children.

May 29, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Supplement may prevent alcohol-related defects
CDP-choline, sold as a brain-boosting agent and under study for stroke and traumatic brain injury, may block skull and brain damage that can result from alcohol consumption early in pregnancy.

May 28, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Alcohol damage before mom knows of pregnancy
Exposure to alcohol in early pregnancy changes the way genes function and influences brain structure in mice — and looks like human fetal alsohol syndrome.

May 27, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Hydrogels boost stem cells to heal brains
Researchers have engineered 'hydrogels' to hold stem cells for transplant into damaged brain and eyes of mice. The transplanted cells helped reverse blindness and help mice recover from stroke.

May 26, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Mom's obesity compromises infant immune system
When exactly does the immune system of babies born to obese mothers get compromised? Very early, according to a new study from the University of California, Riverside.

May 25, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Risk of preterm delivery for women born preterm
Women who were born preterm have a higher risk of giving birth to preterm children, according to a study from researchers of the CHU Sainte-Justine and the University of Montreal.

May 22, 2015
-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Acetaminophen can lower testosterone in fetal boys
Use of acetaminophen — or paracetamol — by pregnant women reduces testosterone in unborn boys. These findings help explain links between acetaminophen use in pregnancy and testicular problems in boys.

May 21, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

DNA reveals impact of malnutrition on fetus
This is the first study to look at prenatal nutrition and its affect on the genome of the adult that infant grows into.

May 20, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Taking immortality out of cancer
Scientists have discovered a new strategy to fight cancer. They target telomeres — the structures at both ends of each chromosome. One group has found that blocking the TRF1 gene, essential to telomeres, creates dramatic improvements in mice with lung cancer.

May 19, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Genome editing could cure sickle cell anemia
Researchers have shown that changing just a single letter of the DNA of human red blood cells in the laboratory increases their production of oxygen-carrying hemoglobin - a world-first advance that could lead to a cure for sickle cell anaemia and other blood disorders.

May 18, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Brain cells are capable of switching "careers"
Scientists at the Salk Institute have found a single molecule controls the fate of mature sensory neurons. This discovery changes our view of neurons – which are responsible for specific tasks in the brain – as being much more flexible than anticipated.

May 15, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

C-section knocks out infant gut microbiome
A fecal sample analysis of 98 Swedish infants over the first year of life found a connection between the development of a child's gut microbiome and the way baby is delivered.

May 14, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Placenta protects baby with transporter proteins
An important function of the human placenta is to protect the fetus from toxic substances cirulating through maternal blood. Placental membrane-bound transporter proteins, known as multidrug resistance proteins, protect the fetus by recirculating unwanted materials back into the mother's blood away from the fetus.

May 13, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Shedding new light on reproductive disorders
A National Institutes of Health study has solved an ovarian cell mystery. Scientists have figured out the origin of one of the cell types that make up the ovary. They also discovered how ovarian cells share data when a developing follicle holds the next maturing egg.

May 12, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How our brain plugs in vision stabilization
A new study reveals how important neurons find their way from the retina to our inner brain.

May 11, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How to stop "jumping genes" in stem cells
Histone H3.3 helps keep the mouse genome stable by keeping retrotransposons from "jumping" out of place.

May 8, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Parent training reduces autism behavioral problems
Young children with autism spectrum disorder, who also have serious behavioral problems, show improvement when their parents are trained with strategies to manage tantrums, aggression, self-injury, and non-compliance.

May 7, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Replace 1 sugar drink a day - cut risk of diabetes
A new study indicates that for every 5% energy increase provided by sweet drinks, in tandem the risk of developing type 2 diabetes can increase by 18%. However, the study also estimates replacing your daily consumption of one sugary drink with either water or unsweetened tea or coffee — lowers your risk of developing diabetes by between 14% and 25%.

May 6, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Engineering new blood vessels is closer to reality
New research suggests that suppressing parts of the human innate immune system helps engineered vascular grafts become fully functional blood vessels.

May 5, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Cell mitochondria are key to stem cell development
Research has discovered mitochondria, the major energy source for most cells, play an important role in stem cell development too. This purpose is distinct from the tiny organelle's traditional job as a cell's main source of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) needed in cell metabolism.

May 4, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How come we are warm-blooded?

Our arteries and veins run parallel to one another in order to regulate our body temperature.

May 1, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Most People Carry Recessive Disease Mutations
Humans carry an average of one or two mutations per person that can cause severe genetic disorders or prenatal death.

Apr 30, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Link between physical forces and limb deformities
Engineers and a pediatric surgeon have joined forces to discover that physical forces like pressure and tension affect the development of limbs in embryos — research that could someday be used to help prevent birth defects.

Apr 29, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Genetics behind fetal overgrowth syndrome found
New research could lead to safer, more efficient assisted reproduction procedures.

Apr 28, 2015
-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Mitochondrial genes and disease inheritance
Mitochondrial diseases are maternally inherited gene disorders that cause many debilitating conditions without any cures. Now, Salk Institute reports a successful gene-editing technology to prevent passing mutated mitochondrial DNA from mothers to offspring in mice.


Apr 25, 2015-----
News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How young cells learn to communicate

Most developmental biologists have assumed that young cells, only recently born from stem cells and called "progenitors," are already competent at inter-communication with other cells - but they have a lot to learn.

Apr 24, 2015 -----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How oxytocin makes a mom
The oxytocin hormone teaches mom's brain to respond to her baby's needs. Future research could lead to using oxytocin as treatment for social anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder and perhaps other brain behavioral issues as well.

Apr 23, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Stem cell based birth defect can repair facial bones
Researchers have pinpointed the primary cause of a rare skull disorder in infants, a discovery that could also help wounded soldiers, car-wreck victims and other patients recover from disfiguring facial injuries.

Apr 22, 2015----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How zinc deficiency affects embryo and adults
Zinc deficiency is associated with diseases such as autism, lung cancer, prostate cancer, and ovarian cancer — and can affect the bilateral symmetry in the developing embryo.

Apr 21, 2015----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Found — proteins critical for DNA repair
For the first time science has observed the structure and function of specific proteins critical in the repair of DNA. While providing some much needed answers, it also opens up exciting possibilities for bio-engineering the cell.

Apr 20, 2015----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Breast cancer and the fountain of youth
The Fountain of Youth has been discovered and it's not in Florida as Ponce de Leon claimed. Instead, it is in the mammary glands of genetically modified mice.

Apr 17, 2015----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Newborn brain is altered by mom's use of cocaine
MRI brain scans of 152 infants found disruptions of connections in the amygdala-prefrontal network. First study of its kind.

Apr 16, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Dad's sperm may hold clues to autism
In a small study of 68 children, Johns Hopkins researchers found on the sperm of the fathers, DNA tags that may have contributed to the condition of their children.

Apr 15, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How electrical charges move through DNA
Electrical charges not only move through wires, they also travel along lengths of DNA, the molecule of life. This property is known as charge transport.

Apr 14, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

When using our brain muddles solving a problem
Why do some people learn a new skill right away, while others only gradually improve? What is happening in their brains that creates this variation.

Apr 13, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Autism's early 'neighborhood'

Scientists have found that in children with autism, sensorimotor regions of the brain become overconnected at the expense of later-developing higher-order brain functions.

Apr 10, 2015
-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Food allergies can be transmitted through blood
In rare cases, children can develop anaphylactic allergies to previously tolerated foods after receiving blood products via transfusion.

Apr 9, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

A method for blocking pregnancy loss?
Maternal infection is consistently identified as contributing to pregnancy complications and premature birth. The same small immune molecules are also implicated in other pregnancy losses. Now, research finds mom's immune cells can be be stopped from attacking her fetus and save the pregnancy.

Apr 8, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Why we are becoming myopic

Short-sightedness (myopia) is reaching epidemic proportions. Some scientists think they have found a reason why.

Apr 7, 2015
-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How do lifeforms know how to be the right size?
Probing deeply into genetics and biology at the earliest moments of development, researchers found that the size and pattern of an embryo depends on the mother's investment in the egg before it leaves her ovary.

Apr 6, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

New clues on origin of Hirschsprung's disease
Rare disorder can spring from common mutations in nerve development.

Apr 3, 2015
-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Smoking increases diabetes in female baby as adult
Women whose parents smoked during their pregnancy had an increased risk for diabetes mellitus independent of risk factors such as their own birth weight or adult weight. This data adds to evidence that prenatal environmental chemical exposures can contribute to adult diabetes mellitus.

Apr 2, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

About Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia
Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is not as well known as muscular dystrophy and cystic fibrosis, but is also a life-threatening birth defect — and just as common.

Apr 1, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Some birth defects due to shattered chromosomes
When children inherit chromosomes from their parents, some minor genetic changes frequently occur with little consequence. The human genome can be very forgiving. Except with chromosomal shattering — chromothripsis— which can even be found in a healthy mom who gives birth to an affected child.

Mar 31, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Why we need to make neurons from stem cells
A research team at UC San Francisco has discovered an RNA molecule called Pnky (pronounced “Pinky” and inspired by the American cartoon series Pinky and the Brain) can increase the production of neurons made by neural stem cells.

Mar 30, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

A link between autism and higher intelligence
Genes linked with a greater risk of developing autism may also be associated with higher intelligence. Researchers found new evidence linking genes associated with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) with higher intelligence.

Mar 27, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Solving the "obstetrical dilemma"
Women's wider hips do not mean we are less efficient runners. Although never studied or proved with research, a notion has existed that wide hips make women less efficient walkers as well — until this Harvard study.

Mar 26, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Inducing pluripotent stem cells to reprogram
Anyone in cell biology recognizes the genes Oct3/4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc, also known as "OSKM" or the "Yamanaka factor." Shinya Yamanaka isolated these factors and re-introduced them into ordinary adult skin cells which reprogrammed those cells back to an embryonic state. These first induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, won Yamanaka the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for 2012.

Mar 25, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Radical vaccine against herpes viruses
Researchers at Howard Hughes Medical Institute at Albert Einstein College of Medicine have created a powerful vaccine against herpes viruses.

Mar 24, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Leukemia cells changed into harmless immune cells
After a chance observation in the lab, researchers at Stanford University School of Medicine found found they could change dangerous leukemia cells into mature and harmless immune cells called macrophages.

Mar 23, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Infant leukemia results from one rearranged gene
Pediatric Cancer Genome Project reports that a highly aggressive form of leukemia in infants has surprisingly few mutations except for a chromosome rearrangment that affects one gene.

Mar 20, 2015
-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Mom's age at childbirth affects boy baby as adult
A mother's age at her child's birth may affect her male child's birth weight as well as his adult chance of becomming diabetic.

Mar 19, 2015
-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How dieting and fasting turn off inflammation
Researchers have found a compound produced, when dieting or fasting, that can block inflammation as seen in such disorders as type 2 diabetes, atherosclerosis, and Alzheimer's.

Mar 18, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

A mutation that can cause male infertility
Brown University biologists have determined how the loss of a gene results in infertility in mice. Their work in the complex process of sperm generation may directly apply to a similar loss of fertility in men.

Mar 17, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How to build a gene location APP
There is a new "app" for finding and mapping specific gene locations on a gene or DNA sequence of a chromosome. Scientists from the University of Massachusetts Medical School (UMMS) are using one of the hottest tools in biomedical research to locate genes on chromosomes — CRISPR/Cas9.

Mar 16, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Bioelectricity key in brain development and repair
More than on/off switch, electric signals tell cells where and how to grow. Research conducted by Tufts University shows that bioelectrical signals control and instruct embryonic brain development.

Mar 13, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Low Omega-3 and Vitamin D affects brain serotonin
Although omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin D have been seen to improve cognitive function and behavior in certain brain disorders; low levels of omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin D will negatively affect brain development and function as well.

Mar 12, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

DNA-binding protein critical to normal embryo
Scientists have found that CTCF, a DNA-binding protein, is essential in the body plan of a developing embryo.

Mar 11, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Developing a sense of taste
Our sense of taste is actually a combination of smell, taste and texture. A single taste bud can have dozens of receptor cells sending signals of sour, sweet, salty and bitter through nerve pathways to our brain. Taste even plays a role in digestion, preparing the stomach for a meal. But more significantly, taste cells regenerate every 10 days.

Mar 10, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Mechanical stress is key in cell to cell fusion
The process of cell fusion was thought to be simple and straight forward, but turns out to be complicated. It is a two way street where one cell protrudes into another, while the invaded cell pushes back. Resistance is critical to the fusion process. Without it, the cell being invaded is simply pushed away ending fusion.

Mar 9, 2015------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

New hormone mimics the effects of exercise
A new human hormone, MOTS-c, has just been identified that protects against obesity and diabetes. The research was done in mice, but the chemistry exists in all mammals. MOTS-c was found in mitochondrial DNA while other hormones are produced in the DNA nucleus. It primarily targets muscle tissue, where it surprisingly restores insulin sensitivity.

Mar 6, 2015------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Detecting mutations in IVF embryos
Pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is used in fertility clinics to detect abnormalities before they are passed on by parents to their in vitro fertilized (IVF) embryos. However, it was not possible to effectively scan an embryo's genome and detect spontaneous mutations.

Mar 5, 2015------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Master switch' error causes CHOPS syndrome
A puzzling multisystem disorder in three children, had genetic experts scrambling to identify what went wrong. Their research provides important information on key biological events occurring in human development and offers clues for treatment.

Mar 4, 2015------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Epigenome orchestrates embryo development
As the early embryo develops, cells transform into the tissues we need to make and regenerate life. Now, science is finding this process is largely controlled not by our genes, but by the epigenome, the environmental chemical markers that latch onto our DNA and initiate when genes are to be turned on or off.

Mar 3, 2015------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Tobacco smoke and preemies with lung disease
Public health experts know that tobacco smoke exposure (TSE) can be harmful to children with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), a lung disease that often accompanies premature birth. Findings now suggest high levels of second-hand and caregiver smoking greatly contribute to further decline in the health of these infants.

Mar 2, 2015------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Exercise ball decreases labor time and C-sections
Researchers, who are nurses, have found that a peanut-shaped exercise ball can be a highly effective tool to accelerate labor following an epidural.

Feb 27, 2015------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Why some older mothers' babies have birth defects
Researchers have found a possible clue to why older mothers face a higher risk for having babies born with conditions such as Down syndrome — it's in the numbers.

Feb 26, 2015------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Cerebral palsy – it can be in your genes
An international research group led by a team at the University of Adelaide has made what they believe could be the biggest discovery into cerebral palsy in 20 years.

Feb 25, 2015------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Baby formula poses arsenic threat to newborns
In the FIRST U.S. study of urinary arsenic in babies, Dartmouth College researchers found that formula-fed infants had higher arsenic levels than breast-fed infants, and that breast milk itself contained very low arsenic concentrations.

Feb 24, 2015------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

The neural basis for 'being in the mood'
Researchers discover that in female mice, neurons respond to social information depending on her hormonal state.

Feb 23, 2015------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Evolving a bigger brain with human DNA
A tiny but crucial difference between human and chimp DNA boosts a larger brain size in mice given the same human gene in-utero.

Feb 20, 2015------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Angelman Syndrome and our Circadian clocks
Monitoring a childs' biological clocks may be the quickest way to determine the effectiveness of experimental drugs currently under development to treat Angelman syndrome — a debilitating genetic disorder that occurs in more than one of every 15,000 live births.

Feb 19, 2015------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Reversing effects of obesity on female fertility
Scientists were able to increase the fertility of obese mice by reversing some of the obesity-induced changes made to their eggs. This suggests therapeutic approaches could be developed to help overweight women conceive.

Feb 18, 2015------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Parents who smoke risk diabetes in unborn child
Prenatal smoking and diabetes are linked. A child exposed in the womb to tobacco smoke from either smoking parent, is predisposed to developing diabetes as an adult.

Feb 17, 2015------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Baby’s own genes can trigger early birth
Some babies are genetically disposed to being born too soon, and variants in their DNA — not their mother's — may trigger early birth.

Feb 16, 2015------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Growing a brain in 3-D
Researchers have induced human embryonic stem cells to organize into a 3D structure similar to the human cerebellum.

Feb 13, 2015------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

New protein linked to gestational diabetes
For 40 years scientists have accepted there are four enzymes which kick-start the body's ability to get energy [calories] from food. But a protein just found, may be the actual predictor for whether expectant moms develop diabetes during pregnancy.

Feb 12, 2015------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Secrets of how our kidneys develop
Striking images reveal new insights into how the kidney develops from a group of cells into a complex organ.

Feb 11, 2015------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Babies understand complex social situations
By one year old, infants begin to make sense of complex social situations by observing the behaviors of those around them.

Feb 10, 2015------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Gene differences between male and female brains
New research shows DNA methylation plays a significant role in the complex process of fetal brain development.

Feb 9, 2015------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Stress in pregnancy can affect baby's weight
Stress hormones in mom can affect baby. Research has found that increased levels of glucocorticoid stress hormones in pregnant mice cause the moms to eat more but reduces baby weight.

Feb 6, 2015------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Turning back aging in cells
A new procedure quickly and efficiently increases the length of human telomeres. Telomeres are the protective caps at the ends of chromosomes which when eroded, lead to aging and disease.

Feb 5, 2015------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Insecticides with pyrethroids linked to ADHD
Rutgers University suggests pregnant women exposed to common pesticides may bear children suseptible to ADHD.

Feb 4, 2015------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

A gene vital to the central nervous system
Scientists have identified a gene that helps regulate how well nerves of the central nervous system are insulated, and healthy insulation is vital for increasing the conductivity in nerve signals.

Feb 3, 2015------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Sleep improves infant memory
There is no rest for a baby's brain - not even in sleep. While infants sleep they are reprocessing what they have learned.

Feb 2, 2015------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Personalized treatment for intellectual disability?
Scientists can protect animals against a type of genetic neural error causing intellectual disability, including serious memory impairment and altering anxiety levels.

Jan 30, 2015------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Things smell good for a reason...
Fruit flies can smell healthy antioxidants in fruit and eating these antioxidants protects the fruit fly's cells from "free radicals." Humans also use smell to detect "healthy" food. But we are just beginning to understand how — and why.

Jan 29, 2015------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Effects of thyroid disorders on reproductive health
Thyroid disease can significantly affect a woman's ability to have children. A new review of the disease promotes thyroid screening for all women wanting to begin their families.

Jan 28, 2015------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

BPA and estradiol affect sperm development
Washington State University researchers have found a direct link between the plastics component bisphenol A, or BPA, and disrupted sperm production. The chemical disrupts the delicate DNA interactions needed to create sperm which might explain declining sperm counts.

Jan 27, 2015------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Caesarean delivery may hamper sex life
Women who have a caesarean section, forceps or vacuum extraction are more likely to experience persisting pain during sex than women who have a vaginal birth, in the year following childbirth.

Jan 26, 2015------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Turning stem cells into bones, cartilage & stroma
Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have discovered the stem cell in mice that gives rise to bone, cartilage, and a key part of bone marrow called the stroma.

Jan 23, 2015------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

New way to detect genetic errors in IVF embryos?
New research has identified karyomapping as a viable and cost-effective method of detecting a wide range of genetic diseases in IVF embryos.

Jan 22, 2015------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Blocking GnIH could eliminate stress infertility
University of California, Berkeley, scientists have discovered that chronic stress activates a hormone that reduces fertility long after stress has ended — blocking this hormone returns female reproductive behavior back to normal.

Jan 21, 2015------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Some men only commit when women are scarce
Sexual supply and demand affects mate choice among the Makushi people of Guyana, South America. When women are in short supply, men are more likely to seek long-term relationships.

Jan 20, 2015------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How the rotavirus causes infection in children
Researchers now understand how a virus kills up to half a million children each year. Rotaviruses are considered the most important cause of severe diarrhea in children.

Jan 19, 2015------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How to reverse obesity and diabetes?
Researchers at the University of Michigan have identified how a promising drug improves the metabolism of sugar by generating a new signal between fat cells and the liver.

Jan 16, 2015------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

More sun means fewer children and grandchildren
Solar activity affects human fertility across generations according to historical records covering the years 1750 to 1900 and recorded in a church in Norway.

Jan 15, 2015------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Quitting smoking? Women — time quitting to your cycle!
Neuroscience reveals that women crave cigarettes more during their menstrual periods. Coordinating quiting smoking with the timing of your period might help.

Jan 14, 2015------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Circadian rhythms regulate skin stem cells?
The body clock in mice protects cells from oxygen damage during cell division — which may be true in humans as well.

Jan 13, 2015------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

When DNA gets sent to "time-out"
For a skin cell to do its job, it must turn on a completely different set of genes than would a liver cell — and then keep genes it doesn't need switched off. One way of turning off large groups of genes all at once is to send them to "time-out" at the edge of the nucleus, where they are kept quiet.

Jan 12, 2015------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How a crucial protein aids learning and memory
Johns Hopkins researchers have studied the movement of the protein SynGap within brain cells and found that when SynGAP is released from dendrites, they grow larger which strengthens synapses and memory.

Jan 9, 2015------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Exposure to cold 'switches' white fat to brown fat
New research has uncovered a part of our metabolism with great flexibility. Thirty percent of cells that appear to be white fat rapidly turned into brown fat cells after being mildly stressed with cold temperature.

Jan 8, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

'Biological clock' may be able to kill cancer cells
Cell biologists have targeted telomeres in mice with a small molecule called 6-thiodG. This molecule can take advantage of a cell's 'biological clock' and kill cancer cells — and shrink tumors.

Jan 7, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Molecular network identified underlying ASD
Researchers in the United States have identified a molecular network of many of the genes previously shown to contribute to autism spectrum disorders. This finding provides a map of some of the crucial protein interactions contributing to autism and will help uncover new gene candidates for the disease.

Jan 6, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Enzyme SPPL3 helps activate our immune system
Already known to cut proteins, the enzyme SPPL3 turns out to have additional properties. In a newly discovered role SPPL3 activates T cells — the immune system's foot soldiers.

Jan 5, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Egg and sperm cells made from human stem cells
Scientists at the University of Cambridge working with the Weizmann Institute have created primordial germ cells - cells that will become egg and sperm — using human embryonic stem cells. Although this conversion had previously been done with rodent stem cells, this the first time it has been achieved efficiently using human stem cells.

Jan 2, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

High-fat diet in pregnancy harms stem cells in fetus
The findings may provide a broad context for the rise in immune diseases and allergies in children.

Jan 1, 2015-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Genetic mutation cause of ovarian failure
Tel Aviv University researchers discover unique genetic disorder responsible for ovarian insufficiency in women under 40.

 

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