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Welcome to The Visible Embryo, a comprehensive educational resource on human development from conception to birth.

The Visible Embryo provides visual references for changes in fetal development throughout pregnancy and can be navigated via fetal development or maternal changes.

The National Institutes of Child Health and Human Development awarded Phase I and Phase II Small Business Innovative Research Grants to develop The Visible Embryo in 1993 as a first generation internet teaching tool consolidating human embryology teaching for first year medical students.

Today, The Visible Embryo is linked to over 600 educational institutions and is viewed by more than 1 million visitors each month. The field of early embryology has grown to include the identification of the stem cell as not only critical to organogenesis in the embryo, but equally critical to organ function and repair in the adult human. The identification and understanding of genetic malfunction, inflammatory responses, and the progression in chronic disease, begins with a grounding in primary cellular and systemic functions manifested in the study of the early embryo.


WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform


The World Health Organization (WHO) has created a new Web site to help researchers, doctors and patients obtain reliable information on high-quality clinical trials. Now you can go to one website and search all registers to identify clinical trial research underway around the world!



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Disclaimer: The Visible Embryo web site is provided for your general information only. The information contained on this site should not be treated as a substitute for medical, legal or other professional advice. Neither is The Visible Embryo responsible or liable for the contents of any websites of third parties which are listed on this site.
Content protected under a Creative Commons License.

No dirivative works may be made or used for commercial purposes.

 
Pregnancy Timeline by SemestersFetal liver is producing blood cellsHead may position into pelvisBrain convolutions beginFull TermWhite fat begins to be madeWhite fat begins to be madeHead may position into pelvisImmune system beginningImmune system beginningPeriod of rapid brain growthBrain convolutions beginLungs begin to produce surfactantSensory brain waves begin to activateSensory brain waves begin to activateInner Ear Bones HardenBone marrow starts making blood cellsBone marrow starts making blood cellsBrown fat surrounds lymphatic systemFetal sexual organs visibleFinger and toe prints appearFinger and toe prints appearHeartbeat can be detectedHeartbeat can be detectedBasic Brain Structure in PlaceThe Appearance of SomitesFirst Detectable Brain WavesA Four Chambered HeartBeginning Cerebral HemispheresFemale Reproductive SystemEnd of Embryonic PeriodEnd of Embryonic PeriodFirst Thin Layer of Skin AppearsThird TrimesterSecond TrimesterFirst TrimesterFertilizationDevelopmental Timeline
Click on weeks 0 - 40 to follow fetal growth every two weeks
Google Search artcles published since 2007
 
Home-   -History-  -Bibliography-   -Pregnancy TimelinePrescription Drugs  -    Pregnancy Calculator -    Reproductive System- -  News Alerts

 

Sep 16, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Key to making new muscles
Researchers have developed a new technique to promote tissue repair in damaged muscles. The technique also creates a pool of muscle stem cells to support multiple rounds of muscle repair.

Sep 15, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Preemie apnea therapy has no long-term effects
Caffeine therapy, given for sleep apnea in premature infants, has no long-term harmful effects on sleep or their breathing control, according to a new study, the first in humans.

Sep 12, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

No link between antidepressants and autism risk
Previous studies that suggest an increase in autism among children of women on antidepressants, may in fact reflect the statistical risk to children of mothers with severe depression.

Sep 11, 2014
------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Exercise before school reduces ADHD symptoms
Paying attention all day in school as a kid isn’t easy, especially for those who are at a higher risk of ADHD, or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

Sep 10, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

"Healthier" brains in kids who exercise
A new study of 9 and 10-year-olds finds that those who are more aerobically fit have more fibrous and compact white-matter in their brain than peers who are less fit.

Sep 9, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Pregnant women NEED to get flu vaccine
Both mother and fetus are at increased risk for complications of flu infection during pregnancy. And prenatal care providers say they’re advising women to get the flu vaccine. But many pregnant women don’t understand — and don’t get the vaccine.

Sep 8, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Calcium and reproduction go together
Calcium is key to animal and plant fertilization. Everyone's heard of the birds and the bees. But that old expression leaves out the flowers — which are just as important.

Sep 5, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Thymus organ grown from cells in a lab
Laboratory-grown replacement organs have moved a step closer with the completion of a new study where scientists have grown a fully functional organ from transplanted laboratory-created cells and placed it in a living mouse.

Sep 4, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Single change in DNA could initiate fragile X
Researchers reveals how the alteration of a single nucleotide—the basic building block of DNA—could initiate fragile X syndrome, the most common inherited form of intellectual disability.

Sep 3, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Missing protein restored in muscular dystrophy
For the first time, a research team has succeeded in restoring a missing repair protein in skeletal muscle of patients with muscular dystrophy.

Sep 2, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How NSAIDs, like aspirin, affect tissue membranes
Researchers have found that three commonly used NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), work by altering enzymes in cell membranes.

Sep 1, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Anti-depressant targets child medulloblastoma
An international research team suggests repurposing an anti-depressant medication to target the molecular pathway that causes an aggressive form of medulloblastoma, the most common brain cancer in children.

Aug 29, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Children with autism have extra synapse junctions
Children and adolescents with autism have a surplus of synapses in the brain, and this excess is due to a slowdown in the normal brain "pruning" process which occurs during development.

Aug 28, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Mental illness-linked genes reduce synapses
A genetic variation linked to schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and severe depression wreaks havoc on connections among neurons in the developing brain, a team of researchers reports.

Aug 27, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Phthalates in plastics can block testosterone
Phthalates found in plastics could block hormone involved in sexual function, bone density, and cognitive function.

Aug 26, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

microRNAs new basis for sex determination
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) scientists have found a subset of very small genes, called microRNAs (miRNAs), play a key role in differentiating male and female tissues in the fruit fly.

Aug 25, 2014
------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Stress in pregnancy passed down for generations
Scientists investigating pregnancies in four generations of rats show that inherited epigenetic effects of stress could affect pregnancies for generations.

Aug 22, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Embryonic cell fate sealed by the speed of a signal
When embryonic cells receive a signal to specialize, that signal can move quickly — or slowly. New research suggests the speed at which an embryonic cell receives a signal influences it’s fate.

Aug 21, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Finding the 3-D structure of a neuroreceptor
Neurons are brain cells, working with our spinal cord, and nervous system to form a complex communication network. Chemicals carry the electric signals connecting these systems. These molecular sized chemicals bind to the surface of neurons via neuroreceptors, opening and closing paths that allow signals to transmit from neuron to neuron. But how does binding occur?

Aug 20, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Prenatal alcohol affects all brain development
Children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) showed weaker brain response during cognitive tasks, than unaffected children.

Aug 19, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How enzymes know what to keep or trash in a cell
The protein Dis3l2 uses numerous recognition sites to capture messages that are flagged for decay.

Aug 18, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Scientists find calorie-burning switch in brown fat
Biologists have identified a signaling pathway that switches on a powerful calorie-burning process in brown fat cells.

Aug 15, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

A neural 'sweet spot' may help curb obesity
Preventing weight gain, obesity, and ultimately diabetes could be as simple as keeping a nuclear receptor from becomming active in a small part of the brain.

Aug 14, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Turing theory (1952) explains formation of fingers
Researchers confirm that a mathematical theory, first proposed by Alan Turing who designed the machines which cracked the German military codes in 1952, can explain the formation of fingers.

Aug 13, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Autism, Sensory Processing Disorders not the same
Groundbreaking research shows children with Sensory Processing Disorders have measureable brain differences from children with Autism Spectrum Disorders.

Aug 12, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Sugar chains guide stem cells to a neural fate
Embryonic stem cells can develop into a multitude of cells types. The key to this may be the long sugar chains dangling from proteins on the surfaces of cells.

Aug 11, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Brain cells arrange themselves by birth order
Generating retinal ganglion cells — the axon cells that extend into the centers of our brain and give us "sight" — depends on "who came first."

Aug 8, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Mom's DDT exposure linked to obesity and diabetes
Exposure of pregnant mice to the pesticide DDT is linked to an increased risk of obesity, diabetes, high cholesterol and related conditions in female offspring later in life.

Aug 7, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Molecular competition specializes adult stem cells
From fruit flies to humans, adult stem cells either self-renew through cell division or differentiate to replace worn-out or damaged organs and tissues.

Aug 6, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Preterm children's brains can catch up years later
There's some good news for parents of preterm babies – latest research shows that by the time they become teenagers, the brains of many preterm children can perform almost as well as those born at term.

Aug 5, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Mothers teach babies fears via mother's own odor
Research in rats may help explain how trauma's effects can span generations — and how irrational fears may be helped by blocking activity in the amygdala.

Aug 4, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Age of female puberty depends on only one parent
The age at which a girl reaches sexual maturity is influenced by 'imprinted' genes, which are the genes of only one of her parents.

Aug 1, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Kisspeptin may trigger IVF ovulation more safely
Researchers have successfully used a new and potentially safer method to stimulate ovulation in women undergoing IVF treatment.

July 31, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Key to egg implantation in uterus
Scientists have identified a crucial regulator for how an egg correctly implants. Wnt5a may also help explain the mechanical defects affecting infertility, abnormal placental development and placenta previa.

July 30, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Found, crucial path to embryo facial development
A key pathway in the formation of the front of the developing embryo gives rise to the face.

July 29, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Good mothering' hardwires infant brain
Watching mother rats care for their pups while simultaneously scanning those pups' brains — shows how nuturing molds brain growth.

July 28, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Two proteins 'pulse' information into memory
Neuroscientists in Germany have succeeded in providing new insights on the link between nerve cells as the interface to the hippocampus and stored memory.

July 25, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Gene link to fatal child inflammatory disease SAVI
Repurposed drugs may offer the first potential therapy to a very rare but devastating autoinflammatory disease in children.

July 24, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Life-saving stem cells may be easier to create
Researchers have found a gene that could be key to developing stem cells — cells that can potentially save millions of lives as they are able to morph into practically any cell in the body.

July 23, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Sexual selection linked to placenta formation
Fish with placentas are smaller and less brightly colored than non-placental fish. Yet if natural selection favors showy displays such as the male peacock's tail, how has sexual selection worked for less attractive males and the opposite sex?

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